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Art of war hidden in Kolmogorov's equations.
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Art of war hidden in Kolmogorov's equations.

Author: MK Lauren Affiliation: Defence Technology Agency, Private Bag 32901, Devonport, Auckland, New Zealand. m.lauren@dta.mil.nz; GC McIntosh; N Perry; J Moffat
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Chaos (Woodbury, N.Y.) 2007 Mar; 17(1): 013121
Database:From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Other Databases: ArticleFirstBritish Library Serials
Summary:
Here we discuss how Kolmogorov's work on turbulence can be used as the inspiration for a new description of battlefield dynamics. The method presented may also represent a new way of describing self-organizing dynamical systems, in place of conventional differential equation approaches. The key finding is that the rate of attrition in a battle appears to be a function of the fractal dimension of the opposing forces.  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: MK Lauren Affiliation: Defence Technology Agency, Private Bag 32901, Devonport, Auckland, New Zealand. m.lauren@dta.mil.nz; GC McIntosh; N Perry; J Moffat
ISSN:1054-1500
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 123834852
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Abstract:

Here we discuss how Kolmogorov's work on turbulence can be used as the inspiration for a new description of battlefield dynamics. The method presented may also represent a new way of describing self-organizing dynamical systems, in place of conventional differential equation approaches. The key finding is that the rate of attrition in a battle appears to be a function of the fractal dimension of the opposing forces. It is suggested that, this being the case, the fractal dimension could be used as a surrogate to represent the organizational efficiency of one force relative to another, commonly called Command and Control.

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