skip to content
An articulation theory perspective of Neil Postman's media criticism Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

An articulation theory perspective of Neil Postman's media criticism

Author: G Michael Orr
Publisher: 2002.
Dissertation: Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This study explores the nature of the public discussion over Neil Postman's media criticisms. Postman has been a popular writer who critiques American education and media from a technological deterministic perspective. This research uses a cultural studies approach to examine the debate over Postman's media views from his two books, Amusing Ourselves to Death (1985) and Technopoly (1992). The significance of the  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Named Person: Neil Postman; Neil Postman
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Archival Material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: G Michael Orr
OCLC Number: 51555317
Notes: Typescript.
Paging starts with leaf 2. There is no leaf 1.
Vita.
Description: iv, 186 leaves ; 29 cm.
Responsibility: by G. Michael Orr.
More information:

Abstract:

This study explores the nature of the public discussion over Neil Postman's media criticisms. Postman has been a popular writer who critiques American education and media from a technological deterministic perspective. This research uses a cultural studies approach to examine the debate over Postman's media views from his two books, Amusing Ourselves to Death (1985) and Technopoly (1992). The significance of the study is that it offers a window into the public discussions over media influences between 1985 and 2000 and provides particular insights into that debate. The study selected Stuart Hall's articulation theoretical perspective to show how arguments, metaphors and ideologies are structured to construct a public discourse over the role and influence of popular media in contemporary American life. The research found that the most dynamic discussions (i.e. arguments) were found in popular magazines that discussed Postman's media views when compared to academic journals that discussed or referenced Postman's views. This reinforces cultural studies view that popular culture is a worthy and more accurate field of study into the struggle for cultural dominance and ideological resistance. Secondly, the study also indicates the effective use of metaphors as persuasive figures of speech in the public debate over Postman's media views. It was shown that the five metaphors most commonly used were also the same metaphors commonly found in current news stories and Western literature. Finally, the study identified seven ideological tensions that were raised in the public discussion over Postman. It also indicated three levels in which ideologies were being transformed or articulated in the articles reviewed. This study has helped to clarify the public debate over media cultural influences and has shown the value of using cultural studies and articulation theory as methods for interpreting that debate and its evolution.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/51555317>
bgn:inSupportOf"Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2002."
library:oclcnum"51555317"
rdf:typebgn:Thesis
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:valueUnknown value: deg
rdf:valueUnknown value: mss
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2002"
schema:description"This study explores the nature of the public discussion over Neil Postman's media criticisms. Postman has been a popular writer who critiques American education and media from a technological deterministic perspective. This research uses a cultural studies approach to examine the debate over Postman's media views from his two books, Amusing Ourselves to Death (1985) and Technopoly (1992). The significance of the study is that it offers a window into the public discussions over media influences between 1985 and 2000 and provides particular insights into that debate. The study selected Stuart Hall's articulation theoretical perspective to show how arguments, metaphors and ideologies are structured to construct a public discourse over the role and influence of popular media in contemporary American life. The research found that the most dynamic discussions (i.e. arguments) were found in popular magazines that discussed Postman's media views when compared to academic journals that discussed or referenced Postman's views. This reinforces cultural studies view that popular culture is a worthy and more accurate field of study into the struggle for cultural dominance and ideological resistance. Secondly, the study also indicates the effective use of metaphors as persuasive figures of speech in the public debate over Postman's media views. It was shown that the five metaphors most commonly used were also the same metaphors commonly found in current news stories and Western literature. Finally, the study identified seven ideological tensions that were raised in the public discussion over Postman. It also indicated three levels in which ideologies were being transformed or articulated in the articles reviewed. This study has helped to clarify the public debate over media cultural influences and has shown the value of using cultural studies and articulation theory as methods for interpreting that debate and its evolution."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/8605962>
schema:genre"Electronic books"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"An articulation theory perspective of Neil Postman's media criticism"@en
schema:publication
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.