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Artist and identity in twentieth-century America

Author: Matthew Baigell
Publisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
Series: Contemporary artists and their critics.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Artist and Identity in Twentieth-Century America brings together a selection of essays by one of the leading scholars of American art. In this book, Matthew Baigell examines the work of a variety of artists, including Edward Hopper, Thomas Hart Benton, Ben Shahn, and Frank Stella, relating their art works closely to the social and cultural contexts in which they were created. Identifying important and recurring  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Matthew Baigell
ISBN: 0521772397 9780521772396 0521776015 9780521776011
OCLC Number: 43561892
Description: ix, 294 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Contents: Walt Whitman and early twentieth-century American art --
American landscape painting and national identity: the Stieglitz circle and Emerson --
The silent witness of Edward Hopper --
American art and national identity: the 1920s --
The beginnings of "The American wave" and the Depression --
Grant Wood revisited --
The relevancy of Curry's paintings of Black freedom --
Thomas Hart Benton and the left --
The Emersonian presence in abstract expressionism --
American art around 1960 and the loss of self --
Pearlstein's people --
Robert Morris's latest works: slouching toward Armageddon --
A ramble around early earth works --
Reflections on/of Richard Estes --
Ben Shahn's postwar Jewish paintings --
Barnett Newman's stripe paintings and Kabbalah: a Jewish take --
Postscript: another kind of canon.
Series Title: Contemporary artists and their critics.
Responsibility: Matthew Baigell.
More information:

Abstract:

"Artist and Identity in Twentieth-Century America brings together a selection of essays by one of the leading scholars of American art. In this book, Matthew Baigell examines the work of a variety of artists, including Edward Hopper, Thomas Hart Benton, Ben Shahn, and Frank Stella, relating their art works closely to the social and cultural contexts in which they were created. Identifying important and recurring themes in this body of art, such as the persistence of Emersonian values, the search for national and regional identity, aspects of alienation, and the loss of individuality, the author also explores the personal and religious identities of artists as revealed in their works. Collectively, Baigell's essays demonstrate the importance of America as the defining element in American art."--BOOK JACKET.

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