跳到内容
Astoria & empire 预览资料
关闭预览资料
正在查...

Astoria & empire

著者: James P Ronda
出版商: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, ©1990.
版本/格式:   图书 : 州政府或者省政府刊物 : 英语查看所有的版本和格式
数据库:WorldCat
提要:
In late December 1788 a worried Spanish official in Mexico City set down his fears about a new and aggressive northern neighbor. Viceroy Manuel Antonio Florez offered a gloomy prediction about the future of Spanish-United States relations in the West. He already knew about the steady march of frontiersmen toward St. Louis and now came troubling word of Robert Gray's ship Columbia on the Northwest coast. All this
评估:

(尚未评估) 0 附有评论 - 争取成为第一个。

主题
更多类似这样的

 

在图书馆查找

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; 正在查找有这资料的图书馆...

详细书目

类型/形式: History
附加的形体格式: Online version:
Ronda, James P., 1943-
Astoria & empire.
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1990
(OCoLC)644148594
材料类型: 政府刊物, 州政府或者省政府刊物, 互联网资源
文件类型: 书, 互联网资源
所有的著者/提供者: James P Ronda
ISBN: 0803238967 9780803238961 0803289421 9780803289420
OCLC号码: 20221237
描述: xiv, 400 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
内容: Astoria: the origins of an imperial idea --
Planning Astoria --
The Russian connection --
To Astoria by sea --
The overland passage: Montreal to the Arikara Villages --
From the Arikara Villages to Astoria --
LIfe at Fort Astoria --
Astoria at war --
Astoria in retreat --
Astoria: the legacy.
其他题名: Astoria and empire.
责任: by James P. Ronda.
更多信息:

摘要:

In late December 1788 a worried Spanish official in Mexico City set down his fears about a new and aggressive northern neighbor. Viceroy Manuel Antonio Florez offered a gloomy prediction about the future of Spanish-United States relations in the West. He already knew about the steady march of frontiersmen toward St. Louis and now came troubling word of Robert Gray's ship Columbia on the Northwest coast. All this seemed to fit a pattern, a design for Yankee expansion. "We ought not to be surprised," warned the viceroy, "that the English colonies of America, now being an independent Republic, should carry out the design of finding a safe port on the Pacific and of attempting to sustain it by crossing the immense country of the continent above our possessions of Texas, New Mexico, and California." Canadian fur merchants and Russian bureaucrats also viewed the young republic as a potential rival in the struggle for western dominion. The viceroy's vision of the future proved startlingly accurate. Within the next two decades an American president would authorize a federally funded expedition to find just the sort of transcontinental route Florez imagined. Equally important, a New York entrepreneur would propose and put into motion an ambitious plan to make the Northwest an American political and commercial empire. John Astor's Pacific Fur Company, with Astoria as its central post on the Columbia River, was Florez's nightmare come true. Astoria had long represented either a daring overland adventure or simply a failed trading venture. The Astorians surely had their share of adventure. And the Pacific Fur Company never brought its founder the profits he expected. But all those involved in the extensive enterprise knew it meant more. Thomas Jefferson once described Astoria as the "germ of a great, free and independent empire," believing that the entire American claim to the lands west of the Rockies rested on "Astor's settlement at the mouth of the Columbia." And John Quincy Adams, the expansionist-minded secretary of state, labeled then entire Northwest as "the empire of Astoria." This book seeks to explore Astoria as part of a large and complex struggle for national sovereignty in the Northwest. The Astorians and their rivals were always engaged in more than trading and trapping. They were advance agents of empire. -- from Preface

"At the heart of this book, Ronda provides vivid and masterly accounts of the voyage of the Tonquin, the overland journey of Wilson Price Hunt, and a day-by-day analysis of the history of Astoria from its establishment in 1810 to the decision of the partners to sell the post to the rival North West Company in 1813....Ronda is as much concerned with the theme of empire as he is with the fortunes of business." -- Journal of Military History

评论

用户提供的评论
正在获取GoodReads评论...
正在检索DOGObooks的评论

标签

争取是第一个!
确认申请

你可能已经申请过这份资料。如果还是想申请,请选确认。

链接数据


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/20221237>
library:oclcnum"20221237"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/20221237>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Place
schema:name"Columbia River Valley"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Event
schema:name"Geschichte Anfänge-1859."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:author
schema:copyrightYear"1990"
schema:datePublished"1990"
schema:description"In late December 1788 a worried Spanish official in Mexico City set down his fears about a new and aggressive northern neighbor. Viceroy Manuel Antonio Florez offered a gloomy prediction about the future of Spanish-United States relations in the West. He already knew about the steady march of frontiersmen toward St. Louis and now came troubling word of Robert Gray's ship Columbia on the Northwest coast. All this seemed to fit a pattern, a design for Yankee expansion. "We ought not to be surprised," warned the viceroy, "that the English colonies of America, now being an independent Republic, should carry out the design of finding a safe port on the Pacific and of attempting to sustain it by crossing the immense country of the continent above our possessions of Texas, New Mexico, and California." Canadian fur merchants and Russian bureaucrats also viewed the young republic as a potential rival in the struggle for western dominion. The viceroy's vision of the future proved startlingly accurate. Within the next two decades an American president would authorize a federally funded expedition to find just the sort of transcontinental route Florez imagined. Equally important, a New York entrepreneur would propose and put into motion an ambitious plan to make the Northwest an American political and commercial empire. John Astor's Pacific Fur Company, with Astoria as its central post on the Columbia River, was Florez's nightmare come true. Astoria had long represented either a daring overland adventure or simply a failed trading venture. The Astorians surely had their share of adventure. And the Pacific Fur Company never brought its founder the profits he expected. But all those involved in the extensive enterprise knew it meant more. Thomas Jefferson once described Astoria as the "germ of a great, free and independent empire," believing that the entire American claim to the lands west of the Rockies rested on "Astor's settlement at the mouth of the Columbia." And John Quincy Adams, the expansionist-minded secretary of state, labeled then entire Northwest as "the empire of Astoria." This book seeks to explore Astoria as part of a large and complex struggle for national sovereignty in the Northwest. The Astorians and their rivals were always engaged in more than trading and trapping. They were advance agents of empire. -- from Preface"
schema:description"Astoria: the origins of an imperial idea -- Planning Astoria -- The Russian connection -- To Astoria by sea -- The overland passage: Montreal to the Arikara Villages -- From the Arikara Villages to Astoria -- LIfe at Fort Astoria -- Astoria at war -- Astoria in retreat -- Astoria: the legacy."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/351907>
schema:genre"History."
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Astoria & empire"
schema:numberOfPages"400"
schema:publisher
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"University of Nebraska Press"
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/20221237>
schema:reviewBody""At the heart of this book, Ronda provides vivid and masterly accounts of the voyage of the Tonquin, the overland journey of Wilson Price Hunt, and a day-by-day analysis of the history of Astoria from its establishment in 1810 to the decision of the partners to sell the post to the rival North West Company in 1813....Ronda is as much concerned with the theme of empire as he is with the fortunes of business." -- Journal of Military History"
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

关闭窗口

请登入WorldCat 

没有张号吗?很容易就可以 建立免费的账号.