skip to content
Astronomers' stars Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Astronomers' stars

Author: Patrick Moore
Publisher: New York : Norton, 1989, ©1987.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st American edView all editions and formats
Summary:
Mizar, Betelgeuse, Sirius, Delta Cephei, Vega, Algol, Eta Carinae are just some of the wonderful names astronomers over the centuries have given to stars. Moore, vice-president of the British Astronomical Association, introduces readers to the mysteries of astronomy by telling the captivating stories of certain stars. For example, Mizar, whose name means "girdle" in Arabic, in the handle of the Big Dipper has a  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Patrick Moore
ISBN: 0393026639 9780393026634
OCLC Number: 18192054
Description: ix, 164 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Shapes of the galaxy --
Parallax demonstration --
Principle of the aberration of light --
Optical double principle --
Mutual revolution of the components of a binary --
Position of 61 Cygni --
Position of Alpha Centauri, with Southern Cross --
Great bear showing Mizar --
Mizar through the telescope --
Position angle --
Electromagnetic spectrum --
Production of a stellar spectrum --
Diagram to show principle of a spectroscopic binary --
Orion showing position of Betelgeux and surroundings area --
Principle of extinction --
HR diagram --
Evolutionary tracks of stars according to modern theory --
Position of Sirius --
Proper motion Sirius --
Orbit of Sirius B with dates --
Size of Sirius B compared with Earth --
Summer triangle area --
Precessional movement of the north celestial pole --
Position of Fomalhaut --
Material associated with Beta Pictoris --
Position of Beta Pictoris --
Position of Algol --
Light-curve of Algol --
Chart of comparison stars for Algol --
Position of Beta Lyrae --
Light-curve of Beta Lyrae --
Positions of Epsilon and Zeta Aurigae --
Size of Epsilon Aurigae according to an early theory --
Flattened disc theory of Epsilon Aurigae --
Black hole theory of Epsilon Aurigae --
Hack's theory of Epsilon Aurigae --
Theory of Zeta Aurigae --
Light-curve of Epsilon Aurigae during the last eclipse --
Position of Mira --
Light-curve of Mira --
Fields of Mira:comparison stars --
Position of Chi Cygni --
Light-curve of Chi Cygni --
Positions of Delta and Mu Cephei --
Light-curve of Delta Cephei --
Positions of Eta Aquilae --
Instability strip on the HR diagram --
Position of Kappa Pavonis --
Position of the Crab Nebula M1--
Development of a nova --
Pulsar principle --
Position of Eta Carinae --
Light-curve of Eta Carinae --
Position of SS433 --
Lawn-sprinkler theory of SS433 --
Position of the Pleiades --
Diagram of the main stars in the Pleiades --
Diagram of the Hyades --
Position of the Orion Nebula --
Impression of S Andromedae as it appeared in 1885 Position of M 31 the Andromeda Spiral --
Production of a Type I supernova --
Light-curves of Types I and II supernovae --
SN 1986G position in Centaurus A with the dust-lane, etc.
Responsibility: Patrick Moore.

Abstract:

Mizar, Betelgeuse, Sirius, Delta Cephei, Vega, Algol, Eta Carinae are just some of the wonderful names astronomers over the centuries have given to stars. Moore, vice-president of the British Astronomical Association, introduces readers to the mysteries of astronomy by telling the captivating stories of certain stars. For example, Mizar, whose name means "girdle" in Arabic, in the handle of the Big Dipper has a visible companion called Alcor--"rider," in Arabic. Modern astronomy reveals that Mizar is actually a system of six stars--three binary pairs--engaged in complex orbital dance. Studying Betelgeuse, a red super-giant in Orion and one of the brightest stars, has helped astronomers to unravel the life cycle of stars--Betelgeuse, bright though it is, is near death. Delta Cephei, a star whose brightness fluctuates in a regular pattern, provided astronomers with the key to measuring the size of the universe. Each of the stars selected by Moore played an important role in increasing our knowledge of the universe. For those who read this thoroughly engaging book, the night sky will never be the same.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

All user tags (1)

View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(2)

User lists with this item (1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/18192054> # Astronomers' stars
    a schema:Book, schema:CreativeWork ;
    library:oclcnum "18192054" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_York_City> ; # New York
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/nyu> ;
    schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1131648> ; # Stars
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/12277566#Topic/astronomy> ; # Astronomy
    schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/523.8/e19/> ;
    schema:bookEdition "1st American ed." ;
    schema:bookFormat bgn:PrintBook ;
    schema:creator <http://viaf.org/viaf/32062500> ; # Patrick Moore
    schema:datePublished "1989" ;
    schema:description "Shapes of the galaxy -- Parallax demonstration -- Principle of the aberration of light -- Optical double principle -- Mutual revolution of the components of a binary -- Position of 61 Cygni -- Position of Alpha Centauri, with Southern Cross -- Great bear showing Mizar -- Mizar through the telescope -- Position angle -- Electromagnetic spectrum -- Production of a stellar spectrum -- Diagram to show principle of a spectroscopic binary -- Orion showing position of Betelgeux and surroundings area -- Principle of extinction -- HR diagram -- Evolutionary tracks of stars according to modern theory -- Position of Sirius -- Proper motion Sirius -- Orbit of Sirius B with dates -- Size of Sirius B compared with Earth -- Summer triangle area -- Precessional movement of the north celestial pole -- Position of Fomalhaut -- Material associated with Beta Pictoris -- Position of Beta Pictoris -- Position of Algol -- Light-curve of Algol -- Chart of comparison stars for Algol -- Position of Beta Lyrae -- Light-curve of Beta Lyrae -- Positions of Epsilon and Zeta Aurigae -- Size of Epsilon Aurigae according to an early theory -- Flattened disc theory of Epsilon Aurigae -- Black hole theory of Epsilon Aurigae -- Hack's theory of Epsilon Aurigae -- Theory of Zeta Aurigae -- Light-curve of Epsilon Aurigae during the last eclipse -- Position of Mira -- Light-curve of Mira -- Fields of Mira:comparison stars -- Position of Chi Cygni -- Light-curve of Chi Cygni -- Positions of Delta and Mu Cephei -- Light-curve of Delta Cephei -- Positions of Eta Aquilae -- Instability strip on the HR diagram -- Position of Kappa Pavonis -- Position of the Crab Nebula M1-- Development of a nova -- Pulsar principle -- Position of Eta Carinae -- Light-curve of Eta Carinae -- Position of SS433 -- Lawn-sprinkler theory of SS433 -- Position of the Pleiades -- Diagram of the main stars in the Pleiades -- Diagram of the Hyades -- Position of the Orion Nebula -- Impression of S Andromedae as it appeared in 1885 Position of M 31 the Andromeda Spiral -- Production of a Type I supernova -- Light-curves of Types I and II supernovae -- SN 1986G position in Centaurus A with the dust-lane, etc."@en ;
    schema:description "Mizar, Betelgeuse, Sirius, Delta Cephei, Vega, Algol, Eta Carinae are just some of the wonderful names astronomers over the centuries have given to stars. Moore, vice-president of the British Astronomical Association, introduces readers to the mysteries of astronomy by telling the captivating stories of certain stars. For example, Mizar, whose name means "girdle" in Arabic, in the handle of the Big Dipper has a visible companion called Alcor--"rider," in Arabic. Modern astronomy reveals that Mizar is actually a system of six stars--three binary pairs--engaged in complex orbital dance. Studying Betelgeuse, a red super-giant in Orion and one of the brightest stars, has helped astronomers to unravel the life cycle of stars--Betelgeuse, bright though it is, is near death. Delta Cephei, a star whose brightness fluctuates in a regular pattern, provided astronomers with the key to measuring the size of the universe. Each of the stars selected by Moore played an important role in increasing our knowledge of the universe. For those who read this thoroughly engaging book, the night sky will never be the same."@en ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/12277566> ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:name "Astronomers' stars"@en ;
    schema:productID "18192054" ;
    schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/18192054#PublicationEvent/new_york_norton_1989_1987> ;
    schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/12277566#Agent/norton> ; # Norton
    schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780393026634> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/18192054> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_York_City> # New York
    a schema:Place ;
    schema:name "New York" ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1131648> # Stars
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Stars"@en ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/32062500> # Patrick Moore
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Moore" ;
    schema:givenName "Patrick" ;
    schema:name "Patrick Moore" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780393026634>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
    schema:isbn "0393026639" ;
    schema:isbn "9780393026634" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.