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Astronomy : the cosmic journey

Author: William K Hartmann; Chris Impey
Publisher: Belmont, Calif. : Wadsworth Pub., ©1994.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 5th edView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Hartmann, William K.
Astronomy.
Belmont, Calif. : Wadsworth Pub., ©1994
(OCoLC)654926344
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William K Hartmann; Chris Impey
ISBN: 0534211925 9780534211929
OCLC Number: 29031369
Description: 728 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
Contents: Invitation to the cosmic journey. Our definition of astronomy --
A survey of the universe --
A word about mathematics --
A note about names of people --
A hint on using this book --
Face to face with the universe --
pt. I. The early discoveries. Prehistoric astronomy : origins of science and superstition. The earliest astronomy : motives and artifacts (c. 30,000 BC) --
Calendar refinements (10,000 --
3,000 BC) --
Other early discoveries --
Origin of the constellations --
The seasons : solstices, equinoxes, and their applications --
Astrology : ancient origins of a superstition --
Eclipses : occasions for awe ; Historic advances : worlds in the sky. Early cosmologies and the abstract thinking (2500 --
100 BC) --
The system of angular measurement --
Early Greek astronomy (c. 600 BC to AD 150). Optional basic equation I : the small --
angle equation --
Ancient astronomy beyond the Mediterranean ; Discovering the layout of the solar system. Clues to the solar system's configuration --
Problems with the Ptolemaic model --
The Copernican Revolution --
Bode's rule --
The solar system as we know it today --
pt. II. Two methods for exploring space : understanding gravity and understanding light. Gravity and the conquest of space. Dreams of escaping Earth --
Newton's law of gravitational force. Optional basic equation II : Newton's universal law of gravitation, Optional basic equation III : calculating circular and escape velocities --
Rockets and spaceships --
The decision to explore the Moon : science and the national policy --
After Apollo --
Space exploration and science : cost and results --
Looking to the future ; Light and the spectrum : messages from space. The nature of light : waves vs. particles --
The spectrum --
Origins of light : electromagnetic disturbances --
Emission lines and bands --
Optional basic equation IV : measuring temperatures of astronomical bodies : Wien's law --
Absorption lines and bands --
Analyzing spectra --
The three functions of telescopes --
Using visual telescopes --
Photography with telescopes --
Photometry --
Image processing spectrophotometry --
Light pollution : a threat to astronomy --
Detecting nature's messages from space --
Interferometry --
New frontiers --
pt. III. Exploring the Earth --
Moon system. Earth as a planet. Earth's age --
Earth's internal structure --
Lithospheres and plate tectonics : an explanation of planetary landscapes --
Other important processes in Earth's evolution --
Earth's magnetic field --
Earth's atmosphere and oceans --
The cosmic connection --
Environmental changes on today's Earth ; The Moon's phases and rotation --
Tidal evolution of the Earth --
Moon system --
Surface features of the moon --
Flights to the Moon --
Lunar rocks : implications for the Moon and Earth --
The interior of the Moon --
Cratering of the Moon and Earth. Optional basic equation V : the definition of mean density --
Ice deposits at the lunar poles? Where did the moon come from?. Talking about the Moon with Carlé Pieters --
Return to the Moon? --
pt. IV. The solar system. Introducing the planets --
Mercury. A survey of the planets --
Comparative planetology : an approach to studying planets --
The planet Mercury --
Undiscovered worlds among the terrestrial planets? ; Venus. The slow retrograde rotation of Venus --
Venus' infernal atmosphere --
The rocky landscapes of Venus --
Lesson 1 in comparative planetology : surface features vs. planet size --
Lesson 2 in comparative planetology : why do some planets lack atmospheres? ; Mars. Mars as seen with Earth --
based telescopes --
The lure of Mars --
Voyages to the surface of Mars --
Major geological features --
Two great mysteries of Mars : ancient climate and ancient life --
Martian satellites : Phobos and Deimos --
Expeditions to Mars. Talking about Mars with Leonid Ksanfomality --
A lesson in comparative planetology : The topography of Earth, Venus, and Mars ; Jupiter, Saturn, and their moons. Introducing the outer solar system --
Jupiter and Saturn --
the planets --
Rings of Jupiter and Saturn --
Satellite systems of giant planets : general properties --
Satellites of Jupiter --
Satellites of Saturn --
Future studies of Jupiter and Saturn ; The outermost planets and their moons. Uranus and Neptune --
the planets --
A lesson in comparative planetology : why giant planets have massive atmospheres --
Rings of Uranus and Neptune. Optional basic equation VI : typical velocities of atoms and molecules in a gas --
The satellite system of Uranus --
The satellite system of Neptune --
Pluto : ninth planet or interplanetary body? "Planet X"? ; Comets, meteors, asteroids, and meteorites. Comets --
Meteors and meteor showers --
Asteroids. Talking about asteroids with Richard Binzel --
Meteorites --
Zodiacal light --
Asteroid threat or asteroid opportunity? ; The origin of the solar system. Facts to be explained by a theory of origin --
Catastrophic vs. evolutionary theories --
The protosun --
The solar nebula --
a presolar explosion? --
From planetesimals to planets --
Evolution plus a few catastrophes --
The chemical compositions of planets --
Magnetic effects and the Sun's spin --
A lesson in comparative paleontology : comparisons among moon systems --
Stellar evidence for other planetary systems --
pt. V. Stars and their evolution. The Sun : the nature of the nearest star. Spectroscopic discoveries --
Composition of the Sun --
Solar energy from nuclear reactions --
The Sun's interior structure --
The photosphere : the solar surface ; Chromosphere and corona : the solar atmosphere ; Sunspots and sunspot activity --
Solar wind --
Aurorae and solar --
terrestrial relations --
Is the Sun constant? --
Solar energy and other cosmic fuels ; Measuring the basic properties of stars. Names of stars --
Images of stars --
Defining a stellar distance scale : apparent magnitude --
A magnitude scale for expressing "true" brightness of stars --
Basic principles of stellar spectra. Optional basic equation VII. The Doppler effect : approach and recession velocities --
Measuring 12 important stellar properties. Optional basic equation VIII : the Stefan --
Boltzmann law : rate of energy radiation ; The systematics of nearby stars : the H --
R diagram. Classifying star types : the H --
R diagram --
The nearby stars as a representative sample of all stars --
Representative stars vs. prominent stars --
Explaining the types of stars : different masses and different ages --
Philosophical implications of theoretical astrophysics ; Stellar evolution I : birth and middle age. Three proofs of "present --
day" star formation --
The protostar stage --
The pre --
main --
sequence stage --
Examples of pre --
main --
sequence objects --
The main --
sequence stage ; Stellar evolution II : death and transfiguration. Hydrostatic equilibrium --
The giant stage --
The variable stage --
Mass loss among evolved stars --
The demise of sun --
like stars : white dwarfs --
The demise of very massive stars : supernovae --
Neutron stars (pulsars) : new light on old stars --
The most compact stellar remnants : black holes --
pt. VI. Environment and groupings of stars. Interstellar atoms, dust, and nebulae. The effects of interstellar material on starlight --
Observed types of interstellar material --
Four types of interstellar regions --
Classes of nebulae ; Companions to stars : binaries, multiples, and possible planetary systems. Optical doubles vs. physical binaries --
Discovery of physical binaries --
What can we learn from binary stars? --
How many stars are binary or multiple? --
Evolution of binary systems : mass transfer --
Novae : exploding members of binary pairs --
Contact binaries and other unusual phenomena --
Examples of binary and multiple systems. Talking about cataclysmic variable stars with Danuta Dobrzycka --
The search for alien planets --
The origin of binary and multiple stars ; Star clusters and associations. Three types of star groupings -. Discoveries and catalogs of clusters --
Measuring distances of clusters --
The nature of open clusters and associations --
The nature of globular clusters --
Origin of clusters and associations --
pt. VII. Galaxies. The Milky Way galaxy. Discovering and mapping the galactic disk --
The rotation of the galaxy --
The age of the galaxy --
Mapping the spiral arms --
Measuring the galaxy's mass --
Comprehending galactic distances --
The two populations of stars --
Probing the galactic center --
Homing in on the galactic nucleus ; The local galaxies. Distances to galaxies --
The nearby galaxies --
Surveying and classifying galaxies --
The formation and evolution of galaxies ; Galaxies and the expanding universe. Interpreting the redshift --
Large --
scale structure --
Active galaxies and quasars. Optional basic equation IX : the Hubble law and the age of the universe --
Active galaxies and quasars. Optional basic equation X : the relativistic redshift, Talking about quasars and intergalactic clouds with Adam Dobrzycki --
pt. VIII. Frontiers. Size and structure of the universe. Early cosmologies --
Modern cosmology --
Age and structure ; Origin and evolution of the universe. The big bang --
The very early universe --
The evolving universe --
Epilogue : the universe, life, and you. Our place in the universe --
a cosmic perspective ; Where are the aliens? ; A personal relationship to the universe. Talking about life in the universe with Carl Sagan ; Astronomical ascension and declination coordinates ; The effect of precession on right ascension and declination ; Another celestial coordinate system ; Systems of timekeeping ; Toward the modern calendar --
Appendix 1. Powers of 10 --
Appendix 2. Units of measurement.
Responsibility: William K. Hartmann, Chris Impey.

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Clues to the solar system's configuration -- Problems with the Ptolemaic model -- The Copernican Revolution -- Bode's rule -- The solar system as we know it today -- pt. II. Two methods for exploring space : understanding gravity and understanding light. Gravity and the conquest of space. Dreams of escaping Earth -- Newton's law of gravitational force. Optional basic equation II : Newton's universal law of gravitation, Optional basic equation III : calculating circular and escape velocities -- Rockets and spaceships -- The decision to explore the Moon : science and the national policy -- After Apollo -- Space exploration and science : cost and results -- Looking to the future ; Light and the spectrum : messages from space. The nature of light : waves vs. particles -- The spectrum -- Origins of light : electromagnetic disturbances -- Emission lines and bands -- Optional basic equation IV : measuring temperatures of astronomical bodies : Wien's law -- Absorption lines and bands -- Analyzing spectra -- The three functions of telescopes -- Using visual telescopes -- Photography with telescopes -- Photometry -- Image processing spectrophotometry -- Light pollution : a threat to astronomy -- Detecting nature's messages from space -- Interferometry -- New frontiers -- pt. III. Exploring the Earth -- Moon system. Earth as a planet. Earth's age -- Earth's internal structure -- Lithospheres and plate tectonics : an explanation of planetary landscapes -- Other important processes in Earth's evolution -- Earth's magnetic field -- Earth's atmosphere and oceans -- The cosmic connection -- Environmental changes on today's Earth ; The Moon's phases and rotation -- Tidal evolution of the Earth -- Moon system -- Surface features of the moon -- Flights to the Moon -- Lunar rocks : implications for the Moon and Earth -- The interior of the Moon -- Cratering of the Moon and Earth. Optional basic equation V : the definition of mean density -- Ice deposits at the lunar poles? Where did the moon come from?. Talking about the Moon with Carlé Pieters -- Return to the Moon? -- pt. IV. The solar system. Introducing the planets -- Mercury. A survey of the planets -- Comparative planetology : an approach to studying planets -- The planet Mercury -- Undiscovered worlds among the terrestrial planets? ; Venus. 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Uranus and Neptune -- the planets -- A lesson in comparative planetology : why giant planets have massive atmospheres -- Rings of Uranus and Neptune. Optional basic equation VI : typical velocities of atoms and molecules in a gas -- The satellite system of Uranus -- The satellite system of Neptune -- Pluto : ninth planet or interplanetary body? "Planet X"? ; Comets, meteors, asteroids, and meteorites. Comets -- Meteors and meteor showers -- Asteroids. Talking about asteroids with Richard Binzel -- Meteorites -- Zodiacal light -- Asteroid threat or asteroid opportunity? ; The origin of the solar system. Facts to be explained by a theory of origin -- Catastrophic vs. evolutionary theories -- The protosun -- The solar nebula -- a presolar explosion? -- From planetesimals to planets -- Evolution plus a few catastrophes -- The chemical compositions of planets -- Magnetic effects and the Sun's spin -- A lesson in comparative paleontology : comparisons among moon systems -- Stellar evidence for other planetary systems -- pt. V. Stars and their evolution. The Sun : the nature of the nearest star. Spectroscopic discoveries -- Composition of the Sun -- Solar energy from nuclear reactions -- The Sun's interior structure -- The photosphere : the solar surface ; Chromosphere and corona : the solar atmosphere ; Sunspots and sunspot activity -- Solar wind -- Aurorae and solar -- terrestrial relations -- Is the Sun constant? -- Solar energy and other cosmic fuels ; Measuring the basic properties of stars. Names of stars -- Images of stars -- Defining a stellar distance scale : apparent magnitude -- A magnitude scale for expressing "true" brightness of stars -- Basic principles of stellar spectra. Optional basic equation VII. The Doppler effect : approach and recession velocities -- Measuring 12 important stellar properties. Optional basic equation VIII : the Stefan -- Boltzmann law : rate of energy radiation ; The systematics of nearby stars : the H -- R diagram. Classifying star types : the H -- R diagram -- The nearby stars as a representative sample of all stars -- Representative stars vs. prominent stars -- Explaining the types of stars : different masses and different ages -- Philosophical implications of theoretical astrophysics ; Stellar evolution I : birth and middle age. Three proofs of "present -- day" star formation -- The protostar stage -- The pre -- main -- sequence stage -- Examples of pre -- main -- sequence objects -- The main -- sequence stage ; Stellar evolution II : death and transfiguration. Hydrostatic equilibrium -- The giant stage -- The variable stage -- Mass loss among evolved stars -- The demise of sun -- like stars : white dwarfs -- The demise of very massive stars : supernovae -- Neutron stars (pulsars) : new light on old stars -- The most compact stellar remnants : black holes -- pt. VI. Environment and groupings of stars. Interstellar atoms, dust, and nebulae. The effects of interstellar material on starlight -- Observed types of interstellar material -- Four types of interstellar regions -- Classes of nebulae ; Companions to stars : binaries, multiples, and possible planetary systems. Optical doubles vs. physical binaries -- Discovery of physical binaries -- What can we learn from binary stars? -- How many stars are binary or multiple? -- Evolution of binary systems : mass transfer -- Novae : exploding members of binary pairs -- Contact binaries and other unusual phenomena -- Examples of binary and multiple systems. Talking about cataclysmic variable stars with Danuta Dobrzycka -- The search for alien planets -- The origin of binary and multiple stars ; Star clusters and associations. Three types of star groupings -. Discoveries and catalogs of clusters -- Measuring distances of clusters -- The nature of open clusters and associations -- The nature of globular clusters -- Origin of clusters and associations -- pt. VII. Galaxies. The Milky Way galaxy. Discovering and mapping the galactic disk -- The rotation of the galaxy -- The age of the galaxy -- Mapping the spiral arms -- Measuring the galaxy's mass -- Comprehending galactic distances -- The two populations of stars -- Probing the galactic center -- Homing in on the galactic nucleus ; The local galaxies. Distances to galaxies -- The nearby galaxies -- Surveying and classifying galaxies -- The formation and evolution of galaxies ; Galaxies and the expanding universe. Interpreting the redshift -- Large -- scale structure -- Active galaxies and quasars. Optional basic equation IX : the Hubble law and the age of the universe -- Active galaxies and quasars. Optional basic equation X : the relativistic redshift, Talking about quasars and intergalactic clouds with Adam Dobrzycki -- pt. VIII. Frontiers. Size and structure of the universe. Early cosmologies -- Modern cosmology -- Age and structure ; Origin and evolution of the universe. The big bang -- The very early universe -- The evolving universe -- Epilogue : the universe, life, and you. Our place in the universe -- a cosmic perspective ; Where are the aliens? ; A personal relationship to the universe. Talking about life in the universe with Carl Sagan ; Astronomical ascension and declination coordinates ; The effect of precession on right ascension and declination ; Another celestial coordinate system ; Systems of timekeeping ; Toward the modern calendar -- Appendix 1. Powers of 10 -- Appendix 2. Units of measurement."@en ;
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