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The Atlantic in world history

Author: Karen Ordahl Kupperman
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2012.
Series: New Oxford world history.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
As Europeans began to move into the Atlantic in the late fifteenth century, first encountering islands and then two continents across the sea, they initiated a process that revolutionized the lives of people everywhere. American foods enriched their diets. Furs, precious metals, dyes, and many other products underwrote new luxury trades, and tobacco became the first consumer craze as the price plummeted with  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Karen Ordahl Kupperman
ISBN: 9780195160741 0195160746 9780195338096 019533809X
OCLC Number: 777655879
Description: x, 155 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Contents: Introduction: thinking Atlantically --
Atlantic memories --
Atlantic beginnings --
Atlantic people --
Commodities: foods, drugs, and dyes --
Eighteenth-century realities --
Epilogue: the Atlantic.
Series Title: New Oxford world history.
Responsibility: by Karen Ordahl Kupperman.
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Abstract:

As Europeans began to move into the Atlantic in the late fifteenth century, first encountering islands and then two continents across the sea, they initiated a process that revolutionized the lives of people everywhere. American foods enriched their diets. Furs, precious metals, dyes, and many other products underwrote new luxury trades, and tobacco became the first consumer craze as the price plummeted with ever-enlarging production. Much of the technology that made new initiatives, such as sailing out of sight of land, possibly drew on Asian advances that came into Europe through North Africa. Sugar and other crops came along the same routes, and Europeans found American environments ideal for their cultivation. Leaders along the African coast controlled the developing trade with Europeans, and products from around the Atlantic entered African life. As American plantations were organized on an industrial scale, they became voracious consumers of labor. American Indians, European indentured servants, and enslaved Africans were all employed, and over time slavery became the predominant labor system in the plantation economies. Atlantic exchange opened new possibilities. All around the ocean, states that had been marginal to the main centers in the continents' interiors now found themselves at the forefront of developing trades with the promise of wealth and power. European women and men whose prospects were circumscribed at home saw potential in emigration. Economic aspirations beckoned large numbers, but also, in the maelstrom following the Reformation, others sought the chance to worship as they saw fit. Many saw their hopes dashed, but some succeeded as they had desired. Ultimately, as people of African and European descent came to predominate in American populations, they broke political ties to Europe and reshaped transatlantic relationships. -- Book cover.

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a worthy contribution to the considerable number of Atlantic history surveys. ... Kupperman skilfully uses the concept of modernity as the device by which to close the Atlantic story. * Allan Dwyer, Read more...

 
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