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Autograph letter signed : Verona, to Thomas Richmond, [year unknown] June 16. Preview this item
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Autograph letter signed : Verona, to Thomas Richmond, [year unknown] June 16.

Author: John Ruskin; Thomas Richmond; H W Wollaston
Edition/Format:   Book : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Publication:John Ruskin letters to Thomas Richmond (MA 2159) item 67
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Saying he is sorry to hear he is ill but telling him not to pay attention to what the doctors tell him; saying it is oppressively hot; saying that his maid, Kate, has been ill and that they are all "down, more or less;" saying that "my form of unusual 'down-ness' consisting chiefly in the painful sense of my own supreme wisdom, and the impossibility of making myself generally understood--or useful--owing to that  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: Joan Severn
Material Type: Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: John Ruskin; Thomas Richmond; H W Wollaston
OCLC Number: 745914515
Notes: It is possible that this letter was written in 1870 as Ruskin traveled in Italy in June and July 1870 with his cousin, Joan Agnew, Mrs. J.C. Hilliard and her daughter, Constance, all of whom are mentioned in this letter.
Part of a collection of letters from John Ruskin to Thomas Richmond. Letters in this collection have been described individually in separate catalog records; see collection-level record for more information.
Description: 1 item (3 p.) ; 20.7 cm

Abstract:

Saying he is sorry to hear he is ill but telling him not to pay attention to what the doctors tell him; saying it is oppressively hot; saying that his maid, Kate, has been ill and that they are all "down, more or less;" saying that "my form of unusual 'down-ness' consisting chiefly in the painful sense of my own supreme wisdom, and the impossibility of making myself generally understood--or useful--owing to that preeminent disadvantage;" talking of the activities of Constance, her mother, and his cousin Joan [Agnew}; saying that "Joanie is not well at all."

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