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The avant-garde in exhibition : new art in the 20th century

Author: Bruce Altshuler
Publisher: New York : Abrams, 1994.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The avant-garde is a twentieth-century phenomenon. By the turn of the nineteenth century, artists were beginning to address a far larger audience than ever before, and it was one on whose understanding they could no longer depend. Aesthetic concerns, too, had shifted from representing visual phenomena to reconfiguring the visible world in new and complicated ways. The public was rarely amused. Indeed, as these newer  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Exhibitions
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Altshuler, Bruce.
Avant-garde in exhibition.
New York : Abrams, 1994
(OCoLC)609862107
Online version:
Altshuler, Bruce.
Avant-garde in exhibition.
New York : Abrams, 1994
(OCoLC)621451354
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Bruce Altshuler
ISBN: 0810936372 9780810936379
OCLC Number: 28844337
Credits: Editor: Mark Greenberg.
Description: 288 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Contents: Ch. 1. Wild beasts caged : the Salon d'automne, Paris, 1905 --
ch. 2. Cubism meets the public: the Salon des independants and the Salon d'automne, Paris, 1911 ; The Salon of the section d'or, Paris, 1912 --
ch. 3. From almanac to exhibition : the first exhibition of the editors of the Blaue Reiter, Munich, 1911 --
ch. 4. Explosion at the armory : international exhibition of modern art, New York, 1913 --
ch. 5. In the zero of form : 0-10, the last futurist exhibition of pictures, Petrograd, December 19, 1915-January 19, 1916 --
ch. 6. Dada ist politisch : the first international Dada fair, Berlin, June 30-August 25, 1920 --
ch. 7. Snails in a taxi : international exposition of surrealism, Galerie beaux-arts, Paris, January-February, 1938 --
ch. 8. Displacement of the avant-garde: Exhibition of degenerate art, Munich, 1937 ; First papers of surrealism, New York, 1942 ; Art of this century, New York, 1942 --
ch. 9. Downtown : Ninth Street show, New York, May 21-June 10, 1951 --
ch. 10. To challenge the sun : exhibitions of the Gutai Art Association, Ashiya, Osaka, Tokyo, 1955-57 --
ch. 11. Pop triumphant : a new realism: Yves Klein's Le vide, Galerie Iris Clert, Paris, 1958 ; Arman's Full-up, Galerie Iris Clert, Paris, 1960 ; New realists, Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, 1962 --
ch. 12. Theory on the floor : primary structures, the Jewish Museum, New York, April 27-June 12, 1966 --
ch. 13. Dematerialization : the voice of the sixties : January 5-31, 1969, 44 East 52nd Street, New York ; When attitudes become form : works-processes-concepts-situations-information (live in your head), Kuntshalle Bern, March 22-April 27, 1969.
Responsibility: Bruce Altshuler.

Abstract:

The avant-garde is a twentieth-century phenomenon. By the turn of the nineteenth century, artists were beginning to address a far larger audience than ever before, and it was one on whose understanding they could no longer depend. Aesthetic concerns, too, had shifted from representing visual phenomena to reconfiguring the visible world in new and complicated ways. The public was rarely amused. Indeed, as these newer forms of art were presented in now famous exhibitions, derision and anger were the customary responses of the public and the critics. Artists formed more or less cohesive groups of like-thinking individuals who styled themselves the "avant-garde," really a military term for those pathfinders who first venture into unknown or enemy territory. Through photographs of personalities, installations, and works of art, and in a lively text that recounts the artistic thinking and the gossip that surrounded each new movement, The Avant-Garde in Exhibition: New Art in the 20th Century traces this phenomenon from its beginnings in the Fauvist Salon d'Automne in Paris in 1905 through such notorious events as the exhibitions of the Section d'Or (Paris) and the Blue Rider (Munich), the Armory Show (New York), the Futurist 0-10 exhibition (Petrograd), the Dada Fair (Berlin), the Nazi's Degenerate Art Exhibition (Munich), the First Papers of Surrealism (New York), Peggy Guggenheim's Art of This Century (New York), the Ninth Street Show (New York), the Gutai Art Association (Japan), Le Vide (Paris), Full-Up (Paris), the New Realists (New York), Primary Structures (New York), and When Attitudes Become Form (Bern).

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