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Avoiding common nursing errors

Author: Jeannie Scruggs Garber; Monty Gross; Anthony D Slonim; et al
Publisher: Philadelphia : Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, ©2010.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This handbook succinctly describes over 500 common errors made by nurses and offers practical, easy-to-remember tips for avoiding these errors. Coverage includes the entire scope of nursing practice - administration, medications, process of care, behavioral and psychiatric, cardiology, critical care, endocrine, gastroenterology and nutrition, hematology-oncology, infectious diseases, nephrology, neurology,  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Jeannie Scruggs Garber; Monty Gross; Anthony D Slonim; et al
ISBN: 9781605470870 1605470872
OCLC Number: 338288678
Description: xxv, 547 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Contents: Nursing retention begins with assuring appropriate support for the bedside nurse --
Take care of yourself you will be a better nurse and your patients will receive better care Pause to find space to be still every day --
Traveling nurses need to plan the care they want to provide for their patients from the foundation up --
Know your emotional IQ --
Cultural awareness in healthcare --
Assess your patients health literacy --
Use simulation to assist in educating and practicing your craft practice makes perfect and may prevent harm to a patient --
Provide interprofessional educational experiences for your nurses you may be surprised by what they and the doctors learn --
Goal setting for professional nursing --
Negotiation and conflict resolution are critical to teach your staff --
Know how to manage a bad event that occurs on your units --
Caring for staff and reporting appropriately --
Keeping our patients satisfied with their care --
Know how to avoid workplace violence --
Support your staff through continued professional growth opportunities --
Remember that the new intern on the floor who thinks he knows everything was in diapers or at least middle school when you graduated from nursing school --
Know which doctor to call --
Follow the policy and procedure --
Practice strict confidentiality to make it a habit --
Remember that cutting costs for a particular patient does not solve the healthcare financial crisis --
Ensure that patients get treated equitably --
Know your patients PT INR before giving Coumadin --
Never give oral meds via IV access know your routes --
Proper administration of enoxaparin lovenox injectable --
Before administering insulin make sure you know whose blood sugar you are treating --
Patients with penicillin allergies may safely take antibiotics from other drug classes --
Be extra vigilant with close sounding drug names --
Beware of drugs with similar sounding names or similar appearing packaging --
Administering medication through a feeding tube --
Precipitate in the syringe is a warning sign not to give the medication --
Drugs with narrow therapeutic index are affected by changes in diet health condition or other medications and need to be monitored carefully --
Patient controlled analgesic pump settings require independent two-nurse verification --
Hydromorphone IV concentration is up to seven times that of IV morphine --
Administering monoclonal antibodies Know the signs of hypersensitivity --
Dont forget to calculate dose concentrations when calculating rituxan titrations --
Second nurse verification of dose and rate is a simple cost effective measure to reduce medication errors with high risk drugs --
Always use two patient identifiers prior to administering medications --
Know how to treat hypoglycemia in your diabetic patients --
All IV electrolyte replacement therapy should be infused via pump --Always check the medication package name three to four times before giving the medication to your patient --
Label all medications at the time of use --
Medication administration technology changes your medication administration process --
Know how to plan for the administration of investigational medications --
Know how to reverse the anticoagulant effects of heparin and warfarin --
Use drugs for their intended purposes --
Know what to watch for in your elderly patient receiving multiple medications --
Ensure that over the counter OTC medications are assessed on admission --
Reassess the medication list after an invasive or operative procedure --
Remember that a loading dose of a drug is sometimes needed to achieve appropriate therapeutic levels --
Know that adenosine needs to be pushed quickly at the closest IV port to the patient and the nurse should be prepared for asystole --
Know the reversal agents for narcotics and benzodiazepines --
Be aware of patients taking SSRIs with pain medications and migraine preparations --
Watch for picking errors when using technologies to administer medication --
Know the continuum of the sympathetic agonists --
Know how to mix and administer drugs appropriately --
Always look for the path --
Know how to manage a patients home infusion pump --
Analyze the medication administration process --
Use protocols for the administration of high risk infrequently used medications --
Ensure that medications are administered safely to vulnerable pediatric patients --
Know how to help your patients with their addiction to smoking --
Know that heparins side effects on platelets occur from two different mechanisms --
Be careful in treating the symptoms without treating the disease --
Aspirin know when to use and when not to --
Know how to counsel women about their osteoporosis --
Know the common drugs of abuse and their effects --
Know the ins and outs of intravenous contrast for CT scans --
Dont allow yourself to be over alerted and become complacent --
Know where to get drug information when you need it --
Be careful when giving patients drug samples --
Know the risks of not educating your patients on their medications prior to discharge --
Remember to perform a discharge assessment and vital signs --
Handoffs of care providing seamless care --
Help to establish a patient first mindset they ARE my patients --
Interdisciplinary communication including a case manager can benefit your patient at the end of life --
Do not assume that a patient going to a nursing home does not need education and self management skills --
Can the patient really afford those meds --
The complaining or controlling family may really just be fearful --
Objectively validate the information your patients provide --
Know when to put on your isolation gown --
Know how to care for a urinary catheter --
Remember timely pain management --
Ensure appropriate position of the dobhoff tube prior to feeding --
Know the proper care of a peripheral IV site --
Distractions can lead to medication errors --
Know how to identify patients --
Identifying patients with latex allergy --
Know how to reach the attending physician --
Verbal orders should never be routine always read back and wait for confirmation --
When you are in the patients and loved ones presence you are not invisible or sly Remember they are hypersensitive to your expressions your tone and your activities They hold what you dont do in the same regard as what you do --
Healthcare providers must address end of life issues honestly to give patients optimal care --
The proper removal of urinary catheters is necessary to avoid harm to the patient --
Improve nurse physician communication to improve patient outcomes --
To prevent injury use equipment for the purpose for which it was intended --
Nurse preceptors teaching the next generation of nurses --
Machines alarm patients do not Nothing is more important than the necessity for routine assessments --
Aseptic technique and common sense can help prevent IV site complications --
Avoid incomplete documentation of the patients hospitalization --
Ensure corrections in documentation errors --
Avoid plagiarism in your documentation --
Trust your instincts you know your patient --
Use restraints appropriately --
Reddened bony prominences should not be rubbed --
Use care when charting do not confuse for it could make a big difference to the patient --
Ensure that your patients IV has been removed prior to discharge --
Wash your hands before and after you touch the patient --
Aspirate from central lines and PICC lines before using --
Know how to care for peripherally inserted central catheters to prevent infection --
Cleaning peripherally inserted central catheters --
Keep newsworthy patient information confidential --
Microwave can be dangerous --
Know where your telemetry patient is at all times --
The importance of educating patients and family members to prevent a fall after sedating medication --
Educate families about common dangers in the confused and medically unstable patient --
Ensure that invasive procedures get appropriate site verification outside of the OR --
Move from a blame free to an accountable patient safety culture --
Do not assume that an endstage patient does not want aggressive therapy --
Do not assume an advanced directive always means the patient wants to be a DNR in all circumstances --
The hospital is no place to be when youre sick Help to get your patients moving on the path to discharge --
Know how to care for the over sedated patient on a PCA --
Death comes in a variety of forms and it is important for the nurse to understand the differences --
Know how to manage the combative client and provide safe care --
Preprocedure and postprocedure care for the patient receiving ECT --
Know how to care for the patient with a borderline personality disorder --
Know how to care for the bipolar patient --
Patients who are suspected of becoming detoxified during their hospital stay should be started on CIWA protocol for improved outcomes --
Patients with psychiatric problems can get admitted to any unit in the hospital a little training can go a long way --
Pediatric nurses should be trained to recognize postpartum depression --
Know how to manage the confused patient without restraints --
Remember that your depressed patients may have a medical reason for their depression --
Healthcare providers must develop an appreciation for the patients fear and anxiety generated by tests procedures and diagnosis --
Alcohol abuse and isolation are a deadly combination in geriatric patients Consider a call to protective services it could save a life --
Know how to identify and manage the patient with violent behavior tendencies --
Know how to help the client in crisis --
Know how to assess alcoholism in your medical patients --
Know how to care for the elderly patient with dementia --
Know that vital signs need to be interpreted individually and as trends to appropriately understand the patients condition --
Remember to take blood pressures correctly they affect the prescribed care --
Understand the patients condition prior to holding medications based on BP alone --
When in doubt get a 12 lead EKG Lead II is not always the best lead for interpretation --
Dont just say all clear LOOK --
Recheck the femoral puncture site postcardiac catheterization after vigorous coughing gagging or vomiting even if it is not time for vital signs --
Do not assume it cannot be VT just because the patient is still standing --
Do not assume that a patient is on a low sodium diet just because he or she says oh we dont eat any sodium --
Patient monitors nurses best friends or enemies --
Do not jump to conclusions with chest pain before performing a thorough assessment --
Remember that women also get heart disease but often present with atypical symptoms --
Do not use an AED on a person who is speaking to you --
Know where your emergency equipment is and how to use it --
Patients develop heart failure from structural problems with their heart and the nurse can often help to identify the etiology --
Remember the other arterial vessels affected by atherosclerosis --
Always close the stopcock to an arterial line after drawing blood and flushing the line --
Radial arterial lines and BP cuffs do not belong on the same arm --
Ensure safe patient transfers of critically ill patients --
An understanding of ARDS is important for the nurse to effectively plan care for the critically ill patient --
DIC requires special nursing considerations --
Caring for the patient with shock --
Transducer leveling is critical for ensuring appropriate interventions --
Pressure bag for intracranial pressure monitoring No --
Ensure that the waveform is not dampened prior to reading --
Do not forget to relevel the transducer when the patients position changes --
For intra aortic balloon pump timing or triggering pick an EKG lead with a tall R wave --
Do not confuse failure to capture and failure to sense --
Know how to manage the patient with obstructive lung disease on a ventilator --
Remember that the patients cardiovascular and pulmonary systems work together Dynamic hyperinflation requires acute treatment with intravenous fluids --
Remember that an intravenous fluid bolus is the first step in resuscitation for the patient with shock --
Know how to manage glucose levels in patients with diabetes --
Diabetes need to maintain normal blood sugar 60 100 mgdL --
With diabetic patients be aware of preexisting medical conditions that can influence the outcome of invasive procedures and surgery --
When teaching adolescents new information about diabetes management make sure all members of the healthcare team are working together to motivate the patient and avoid increasing fear and anxiety --
Know how to assess for diabetic foot ulcers --
Could your patient with nonspecific symptoms be hypothyroid --
Evaluating for hypoparathyroidism in patients after neck surgery --
Know the important aspects of insulin physiology --
Insulin know when to give it and when not to --
Know what to tell infertile couples about their condition --
Know how to talk about performance enhancing drugs --
Not all abnormalities in thyroid hormone require treatment --
Think about secondary adrenocortical insufficiency in your patients taking steroids long term You may save a life --
Nothing is ever as simple as it seems particularly when the endocrine system is involved --
Watch for the endocrine changes associated with specific cancers --
Food consistencies are really different and can affect a patients ability to swallow --
Maintain a routine bowel regimen for your patient --
Tube feeding interruptions --
Stop the TPN before obtaining labs from the central line --
Is it just constipation or is it something more serious --
Know the many presentations of blood in the stool --
Save the stool and send it to the lab when indicated --
Know what when and how to feed patients with pancreatitis --
Who should be NPO and why --
Nurses need to know how to administer sedation safely to patients in the GI suite --
Be able to recognize the warning signs for eating disorders --
Be able to assist your patient with appropriate weight reduction strategies --
Know how to manage acute gastrointestinal bleeding --
Encourage appropriate screening for cancer of the lower gastrointestinal tract --
Remember that not all chest pains are related to the heart --
Recognize that the various types of anticoagulants can increase the risk of bleeding --
Always follow the correct procedure when administering packed red blood cells --
Know the signs and symptoms of a blood transfusion reaction --
Blood component therapy should only be performed with isotonic solutions of 9 percent normal saline --
The neutropenic status of patients can only be determined by the complete blood count with differential and not just the white blood cell count alone --
--
Know the methods to reduce chemotherapy administration medication error --
Practice safe handling for all hazardous drug administration including oral drugs --
Use personal protective equipment for chemotherapy handling from beginning to end --
Carefully monitor the patients receiving high dose methotrexate to prevent toxicities --
Always confirm correct placement of a central venous access device that will not give a blood return before administering chemotherapy and blood products --
Always use current height and weight to verify chemotherapy doses --
Always verify that chemotherapy orders are complete The needs to include the appropriate hydration electrolytes premedications procedures and followup laboratory tests that should accompany the specific chemotherapeutic agent that is ordered --
In neutropenic oncology patients where the body's second line of defense is gone it is a good idea to protect the first of defense the skin --
Always verify that a patient understands patient education prior to initiating cancer treatment --
Always check lab values preoperatively for patients with leukemia who have received induction chemotherapy with extended lengths of stays --
Be aware of different dosing regimens of cytarbine --
Investigate any central venous access device CVAD without a blood return --
Patients receiving oral chemotherapy must stay on their prescribed regimens --
Eliminate accidental and fatal intrathecal vincristine administration --
Choose carefully peripheral IV site placement for chemotherapy infusions --
Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious oncologic emergency related to chemotherapy administration --
Know how to assess and evaluate patients in sickle cell crisis --
Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura can be a confusing condition Know how to connect the dots --
Transplant rejection --
Educate on cancer prevention --
Ensure appropriate screening for cervical cancer --
Know the conditions that predispose your patients to hypercoagulability --
Know what causes eosinophils to be elevated on the differential count --
Bone marrow transplantation is an important treatment modality for cancer and nurses need to be aware of the types reasons for their use and complications --
Lymph nodes do not always indicate that cancer is present --
Use proper personal protective equipment when caring for patients with head lice --
There is no need for mass hysteria or mass prophylaxis for aseptic meningitis --
Know how to prevent infection during your patients hospitalization --
Know how to prevent the transmission of shingles --
Do not forget the other side of infection control employees and volunteers --
Twenty students present with nausea vomiting and diarrhea do not assume is it food poisoning --
Comply with hand hygiene guidelines what you do not see is what you or your patient can get --
Know how to manage an infectious diseases outbreak --
Ensure that patient care equipment like hoyer lift pads and linens are laundered by the hospitals laundry and not taken home by staff for laundering as a nice gesture --
The joint commission is here What's our policy on --
Know the basics of infection control --
Know that isolation is not a mystery but that there are clear guidelines --
Know the basics of MRSA and how to care for patients with the infection --
Know the basics of clostridium difficile C difficile to protect your patients --
Know how to care for patients with VRE --
Dialysis catheters vas caths contain large amounts of heparin --
Potassium can be lethal --
Know how to detect urinary retention --
Know the value of an anion gap when your patient has a metabolic acidosis --
Acute renal failure has many causes but ruling out an obstructed urinary system is the first order of business --
Know what to do for patients with nephrotic syndrome --
Know what to do to identify and correct hypomagnesemia --
Know what to do to identify and correct hyponatremia --
Know what your dialysis patients experience and how to help them --
My patient is not urinating information to gather before calling the doctor --
Foley catheters does my patient really need one --
Save the stone for your renal colic patient it may provide the diagnosis --
Ensure good control of your patients blood pressure the kidney may be the cause but it is more likely that is will bear the brunt of uncontrolled blood pressure --
Urine infections mean different things to different patients --
Patients with prostate cancer have a number of treatment options --
Not all headaches are created equal --
Ensure that your spinal cord injury patient knows how to care for bowel and bladder concerns --
Know how to care for the patient with status epilepticus --
Know how to care for the postictal patient with new seizures --
Know the importance of ensuring that myasthenia gravis patients receive their medications in a timely manner --
Know how to manage the nonphysical aspects of traumatic brain injury of your patients and their family --
Traumatic brain injury victims require help beyond their physical needs --
Ensure that neurologically impaired patients with an epidural hemorrhage are monitored effectively --
Patients undergoing conscious sedation should be closely monitored for prolonged effects of medication especially once the procedures are completed --
Know how to prevent nerve compression syndromes --
Know that the stroke patient has a number of nursing needs that can pose safety concerns if they are unaddressed --
Autonomic dysreflexia does happen know how to respond when it happens to your spinal cord injury patient --
Watch for respiratory failure in patients with Guillain Barre syndrome --
Creutzfeldt Jakob disease is a rare cause of progressive neurologic deterioration and should be considered in the patient demonstrating worsening status --
Unilateral facial symptoms may reflect either Bells palsy on trigeminal neuralgia --
Remember that adequate oxygenation is critical to our patients and knowing when they are getting into trouble is important for preventing complications --
Remember that there are a number of signs and symptoms for respiratory system problems but there is also considerable overlap between these signs and symptoms and the diseases causing them --
Remember that an elevated PCO2 alone is not necessarily an urgent problem for the patient --
Remember that sometimes what you do not hear is more important that what you do hear --
Know that steroids are the key to unlocking the treatment for asthma --
Know how to manage your patient with a tracheostomy --
Wear a face shield when suctioning --
Know the signs and symptoms of pulmonary embolism they may be nonspecific --
Know the excessive oxygen therapy in the COPD patient may lead to respiratory failure --
Know the risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea in your patients --
When shaving a ventilated intubated patient, always ensure that the balloon of the ET tube or tracheal has been moved out of the way of the razor --
Air is yellow and oxygen is green --
The multiple faces of pneumothorax --
Know how oxygen affects CO2 in patients with chronic lung disease --
Pneumonia can be a bigger problem than you think get the antibiotics in quickly --
Importance of preoperative teaching for patients and families --
Preoperative use of herbal preparations if you do not ask they will not tell --
Preoperative use of diet pills another Do not ask will not tell --
Discontinue medications before surgery --
Medications for erectile dysfunction and the preoperative patient --
Make sure your preoperative patient is NPO --
Remove jewelry preoperatively to prevent swelling and burns --
Allergies to latex how do you know --
Informed consent is the patient really informed --
Know the problems associated with bowel preparation prior to endoscopy --
Prepare the patient for what to expect during operative care --
Educate patients prior to chest tube removal to avoid being punched --
The importance of the preoperative phone call --
Prepare the patient for surgery both physically and emotionally --
Ensure that the patients undergoing surgery maintain their identity --
Oxygen rich atmosphere using a facemask and electrocautery during local anesthesia --
Preventing corneal damage to the unconscious patient --
Mark the correct surgical site --
Training in emergency airway placement is improved from exposure in the OR --
Patient satisfaction in the operating room --
Residents in the operating room do you know the ACGMEs competencies --
Anaphylaxis in the operating room --
Perioperative nursing how do you define it --
Intraoperative blood salvaging and bloodless surgery --
Meeting physician expectations do I ever do anything right --
Teamwork in the operating room huddle and debrief is this the OR or football --
Think critically in the operating room --
Assessing the patient for risk in the operating room --
Know how to assess for an impaired provider --
Do not let disruptive behavior in the operating room be the cause of harm to your patients --
Ostomy education is essential for the fresh ostomy patient --
Importance of dangling before activity in the postoperative patient --
Prevent wound disruption in obese patients --
Malignant hyperthermia in the PACU --
Frequent postoperative monitoring --
Pneumonectomy patients with chest tubes should not be placed on wall suction --
Activity levels for the total hip arthroplasty --
Common measures for safe cast care --
Remember that traction care requires observation of the pulley system and line of pull --
Ensure correct nasogastric tube placement --
Prevention of infection in orthopedic surgery patients is everyones job --
Know how to prevent infection in your burn patients --
Know that hyperbaric oxygen may help in complex wound care --
Failed back surgery syndrome --
Post op alcohol withdrawal syndrome --
Postoperative cognitive decline delirium is a real problem for patients and demands early identification by nurses --
Postoperative pain management in the elderly there are important things to remember --
Make the sponge count count --
Use incentive spiromentry in your postoperative surgery patient to prevent pulmonary complications --
Postoperative cardiothoracic surgery mobilization --
Postoperative cardiac surgery low cardiac output syndrome --
Postoperative cardiac surgery bleeding --
A postoperative arterial blood gas is only one parameter to assess postoperative respiratory function --
Perioperative cardiac ischemia is one worth paying attention to --
Postoperative stroke in the cardiac surgery patient --
Postoperative cardiac surgery dysrhythmias --
Is it possible that postoperative adhesions are the cause of your patients abdominal pain --
Postoperative paralytic ileus do not let it slow your patient down --
Postoperative urinary complications --
Be alert for surgical site infections in postoperative patients and remember that when the unfortunate occurrence of a wrong site side procedure occurs both surgical sites are at risk for infection --
Postoperative pain management --
Ensure postoperative deep breathing and incentive spirometry where appropriate, but chest physiotherapy adds relatively little value in reducing postoperative pulmonary complications --
Listen to your patients lungs postoperatively to assess for early complications and provide a baseline --
Remember the unique needs to ensure safety of the postoperative pediatric patient --
Remember the special needs of your postoperative elderly patients --
Know when and how to use a blood and fluid warning device --
Ensure the epiglottits is considered in patients with respiratory distress caused by an upper airway etiology since appropriate safety mechanisms need to be put in place --
Out of sight should be out of mind --
Be sure to have patients undress completely --
The nurse needs to be aware of uncommon medical conditions that present as common problems necrotizing fasciitis is one such condition --
Toxic shock when a foreign body can get you --
Know the common presenting complaints may be side effects of the patient's medications like oral contraceptives --
Esophageal varices always need to be considered in the patient presenting with an upper gastrointestinal bleeding --
A little honey can cause a lot of harm --
Act quick time can be muscle with a compartment syndrome --
Remember not all patients that act crazy are in fact crazy There may be important clinical conditions responsible for their condition that can be treated Wernicke encephalopathy is one such condition --
Know how and when to insert a nasogastric tube and when to avoid it --
Know what to do when your patient is assaulted by a snake in the grass --
Coma occurs from a number of different conditions In order to appropriately care for the patient these conditions need to be addressed quickly and specifically --
The skin is the window to the body and rashes may represent important systemic diseases --
Thoroughly search the acutely ill psychiatric patient being cared for in the emergency department --
Challenges to conscious sedation in the emergency department --
Know how to solicit embarrassing information during the triage history --
Do not forget to inquire about home remedies --
Always have a process to ensure that you have the right patient since it is the first step toward establishing a culture of safety in the emergency department --
Foley catheter use in post TURP patients leave it in Please --
Know that different dosing patterns exist for droperidol depending upon the indication --
Pathologic water intoxication in the emergency department --
The electronic medical record job security for nurses --
Know how to care for the patient with jimson weed and other hallucinogenic poisonings --
Know your insulin types --
Be careful when administering medications to kids in the emergency department --
Get the most use out of the equipment you use for patient care Its an ED not an ICU --
Methods for achieving hemostasis in the traumatic tongue laceration --
Infection control is critical for the modern day emergency department --
Considerations made in the sedation of those with impending neurologic or neurosurgical evaluation --
Murphys Law as it pertains to the checking for allergies --
Not all status epilepticus is associated with convulsions --
Allergies rash versus hives local versus systemic --
Triage is not over when the vital signs are taken --
Know the conditions that mimic abuse --
CPR get it right --
A team approach is needed in code situations in the emergency department --
Know when abdominal pain may indicate and ectopic pregnancy --
Drawing blood from the IV line time savers or not --
IV meds-how fast is too fast --
Locards principle and its application to the victim of violence --
Munchausen syndrome --
The baited trap overriding safety features of clinical alarms --
Know how to tell that the defibrillator is really synchronized --
Ensure that there is really a pulse with the rhythm on the monitor --
During transfers, always ensure that you have been given the right patient and report and are sending the right patient and report for more definitive care or procedures --
The emergency department ED does not need to provide all the care a patient needs but always needs to ensure that there is a plan for follow up and the patient understands what to do --
Ensure that the patients being discharged from the emergency department ED know what to do improve their care including medications diet and follow up --
Prior to methotrexate administration for ectopic pregnancy, the nurse must check the labs and verify the dose --
Term birth is not a crisis --
The most important person in the labor or birthing room is not a healthcare provider --
The perineum and introitus were built to pass a term fetus In the absence of extreme congenital needs of the fetus the perineum does not need help preparation or more room --
Laboring women believe what healthcare professionals tell them Tell them something nice about themselves --
Mothering is learned by watching --
It was called the urge to push before it was called laboring down --
The nurse should give Depo Provera medroxyprogesterone acetate using the Z track intramuscular injection method --
The nurse should encourage open glottis breathing during stage 2 of labor and delivery --
Assess the blood pressure of a woman in labor in between the contractions --
Assess the blood pressure of a pregnant woman in the lateral position --
Take prenatal vitamins with beverages that do not contain caffeine and not coffee or milk --
A pregnant woman should perform shoulder relaxation and pelvic tilt exercises for back pain --
Cup one hand against the uterus at the symphysis pubis when massaging an atonic uterus --
To express clots from a uterus after massaging for an atonic uterus for postpartum hemorrhage provides pressure over the lower uterine segment --
Administer vitamin K and hepatitis B vaccines to the newborns --
Suction the mouth of the neonate before suctioning the nose --
Tell the obstetrician that you will ready the operating room after pop offs with a vacuum assisted delivery --
Frozen breast milk should be thawed quickly under running water or overnight in the refrigerator --
Notice persistent and increasing perineal pain in the postpartum patient --
Review the chart and patient history for risk factors of postpartum hemorrhage for early detection of uterine atony --
The nurse should give the measles mumps and rubella vaccine to the postpartum woman using the subcutaneous method --
Postpartum units are not intensive care areas --
Mothers of infants more than 23 weeks gestation have a milk supply ready to feed --
Know natural birth and its nuances before practicing high risk labor and delivery --
Take childbirth classes and read all the books --
Abdominal support after a cesarean section is a welcome gift --
Teach new mothers to read their babys cues --
Remember that pitocin can be dangerous --
Remember to consider and test for HELLP syndrome in patients with severe preeclampsia --
Remember to administer Rh immune globulin after miscarriage --
Know when to suspect and how to treat amniotic fluid embolism --
Preterm labor requires dedicated and supportive care for the mother and fetus --
Know the risks associated with common congenital malformations --
Teach every woman breast self examination you may save a life --
Use appropriate care in a speculum examination --
Know the signs and symptoms for an abusive relationship --
Endometriosis can mimic a number of acute intra abdominal processes --
Look at the placenta it may provide insights into what is wrong with the newborn --
Facilitate maternal infant bonding especially when there are risks to it --
Know how to support the adolescent female and her mother during her first gynecologic examination --
Know how to manage the acutely traumatized pregnant woman --
The nurse in the delivery room needs the knowledge a plan and the skills to care for a depressed newborn --
Know what to do to support high risk mothers with heart disease --
Know how to address third trimester bleeding --
Know how to obtain lab specimens from a newborn --
Know how to assess the newborn infant --
The APGAR score can provide an objective means of communicating a newborn infants status --
Remember that pregnancy is the most common cause of secondary amenorrhea --
Is your patient just tired or is there more to the story --
Know how to help your patients control the symptoms of menopause --
Always provide humidified oxygen for pediatric patients --
Use oral syringes to administer oral medications --
Use gloves with diaper changes --
Use pulse oximetry in children but remember that is also has limitations --
Label all patient tubes catheters and devices to ensure that routes are not confused --
Use capnography during pediatric conscious sedation --
Use emla to reduce painful venipuncture and venous cannulation in children --
Avoid the use of bicarbonate and bolus insulin in pediatric DKA --
Isolation precautions positive until proven negative for RSV --
Maintain thermoregulation during examination of the newborn --
Be careful when catheterizing an infants uncircumcised penis --
Use xylocaine jelly with urinary catheterization --
Check nasogastric tube placement prior to use --
Double check all pediatric chemotherapy --
Use appropriate protection for your immunosuppressed cancer patients including the avoidance of rectal temperatures --
Always place electrocardiogram EKG electrodes correctly --
Ensure that an emergency medication sheet is at the bedside of every patient --
Remember your units and do not misinterpret kilograms and pounds --
Remember your units and do not misinterpret micrograms and milligrams --
Pediatric lab results false interpretation and its consequences --
Decimal errors and miscalculations in pediatric drug dosing --
Ensure the correct size and placement of blood pressure cuffs in children --
Language barriers can jeopardize your patients safety --
Ensure that the pertinent sexual history is obtained on adolescent patients at admission --
Pediatric critical care lack of knowledge and skill in bedside EKG interpretation --
Marfan syndrome pay attention to the warning signs --
Back to sleep except in the PICU --
Strive to provide family centered care in the pediatric environment --
Be mindful of hair tourniquets --
Fentanyl is a very effective narcotic for use in the ICU however it can cause chest wall rigidity in patients when pushed too quickly --
Beware of Munchausens by proxy MSP in children who are thought to present repeatedly with vague complaints --
Ensure that your transport team is prepared for whatever might come in its way --
Intravenous IV access it is your friend but can also be your enemy --
Know how to handle the dislodged tracheostomy --
Ensure that your vital signs are correct --
Confirmatory bias pay attention bad things do happen to children ignoring the warning and looking for alternative reasons will not make it get better --
Remember how to dose medications for extremely overweight children --
Remember that hypovolemic shock is the most common type of shock in children and can occur from conditions as common as gastroenteritis and diarrhea --
Remember to obtain a digoxin level for children with dehydration or renal insufficiency who take the drug --
Remember that iron deficiency anemia is not the only cause of anemia in children --
Know that the child admitted with an acute injury will come back unless you educate the parent and the family on how to prevent injury --
Keep watching for the missed injuries in hospitalized pediatric patients with trauma --
Remember that the wheezing patient might have asthma or something else as well --
Remember the side rails on the crib --
Know that there are multiple causes for conjunctivitis --
Understand the danger of an acute asthma exacerbation --
Be mindful of the opportunities for a child to be poisoned during hospitalization --
Check the settings on the overbed warmers on hospitalized infants and monitor the patients temperature --
Ensure that you have the right patient
Responsibility: editors, Jeannie Scruggs Garber, Monty Gross, Anthony D. Slonim ; section editors, Betsy Hargreaves Allbee ... [et al].
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Abstract:

Describes over 500 common errors made by nurses and offers practical, easy-to-remember tips for avoiding these errors. This book includes coverage of the entire scope of nursing practice -  Read more...

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schema:description"Know how to treat hypoglycemia in your diabetic patients -- All IV electrolyte replacement therapy should be infused via pump --Always check the medication package name three to four times before giving the medication to your patient -- Label all medications at the time of use -- Medication administration technology changes your medication administration process -- Know how to plan for the administration of investigational medications -- Know how to reverse the anticoagulant effects of heparin and warfarin -- Use drugs for their intended purposes -- Know what to watch for in your elderly patient receiving multiple medications -- Ensure that over the counter OTC medications are assessed on admission -- Reassess the medication list after an invasive or operative procedure -- Remember that a loading dose of a drug is sometimes needed to achieve appropriate therapeutic levels -- Know that adenosine needs to be pushed quickly at the closest IV port to the patient and the nurse should be prepared for asystole -- Know the reversal agents for narcotics and benzodiazepines -- Be aware of patients taking SSRIs with pain medications and migraine preparations -- Watch for picking errors when using technologies to administer medication -- Know the continuum of the sympathetic agonists -- Know how to mix and administer drugs appropriately -- Always look for the path -- Know how to manage a patients home infusion pump -- Analyze the medication administration process -- Use protocols for the administration of high risk infrequently used medications -- Ensure that medications are administered safely to vulnerable pediatric patients -- Know how to help your patients with their addiction to smoking -- Know that heparins side effects on platelets occur from two different mechanisms -- Be careful in treating the symptoms without treating the disease -- Aspirin know when to use and when not to -- Know how to counsel women about their osteoporosis -- Know the common drugs of abuse and their effects -- Know the ins and outs of intravenous contrast for CT scans -- Dont allow yourself to be over alerted and become complacent -- Know where to get drug information when you need it -- Be careful when giving patients drug samples -- Know the risks of not educating your patients on their medications prior to discharge -- Remember to perform a discharge assessment and vital signs -- Handoffs of care providing seamless care -- Help to establish a patient first mindset they ARE my patients -- Interdisciplinary communication including a case manager can benefit your patient at the end of life -- Do not assume that a patient going to a nursing home does not need education and self management skills -- Can the patient really afford those meds -- The complaining or controlling family may really just be fearful -- Objectively validate the information your patients provide -- Know when to put on your isolation gown --"@en
schema:description"Pressure bag for intracranial pressure monitoring No -- Ensure that the waveform is not dampened prior to reading -- Do not forget to relevel the transducer when the patients position changes -- For intra aortic balloon pump timing or triggering pick an EKG lead with a tall R wave -- Do not confuse failure to capture and failure to sense -- Know how to manage the patient with obstructive lung disease on a ventilator -- Remember that the patients cardiovascular and pulmonary systems work together Dynamic hyperinflation requires acute treatment with intravenous fluids -- Remember that an intravenous fluid bolus is the first step in resuscitation for the patient with shock -- Know how to manage glucose levels in patients with diabetes -- Diabetes need to maintain normal blood sugar 60 100 mgdL -- With diabetic patients be aware of preexisting medical conditions that can influence the outcome of invasive procedures and surgery -- When teaching adolescents new information about diabetes management make sure all members of the healthcare team are working together to motivate the patient and avoid increasing fear and anxiety -- Know how to assess for diabetic foot ulcers -- Could your patient with nonspecific symptoms be hypothyroid -- Evaluating for hypoparathyroidism in patients after neck surgery -- Know the important aspects of insulin physiology -- Insulin know when to give it and when not to -- Know what to tell infertile couples about their condition -- Know how to talk about performance enhancing drugs -- Not all abnormalities in thyroid hormone require treatment -- Think about secondary adrenocortical insufficiency in your patients taking steroids long term You may save a life -- Nothing is ever as simple as it seems particularly when the endocrine system is involved -- Watch for the endocrine changes associated with specific cancers -- Food consistencies are really different and can affect a patients ability to swallow -- Maintain a routine bowel regimen for your patient -- Tube feeding interruptions -- Stop the TPN before obtaining labs from the central line -- Is it just constipation or is it something more serious -- Know the many presentations of blood in the stool -- Save the stool and send it to the lab when indicated -- Know what when and how to feed patients with pancreatitis -- Who should be NPO and why -- Nurses need to know how to administer sedation safely to patients in the GI suite -- Be able to recognize the warning signs for eating disorders -- Be able to assist your patient with appropriate weight reduction strategies -- Know how to manage acute gastrointestinal bleeding -- Encourage appropriate screening for cancer of the lower gastrointestinal tract -- Remember that not all chest pains are related to the heart -- Recognize that the various types of anticoagulants can increase the risk of bleeding -- Always follow the correct procedure when administering packed red blood cells -- Know the signs and symptoms of a blood transfusion reaction -- Blood component therapy should only be performed with isotonic solutions of 9 percent normal saline -- The neutropenic status of patients can only be determined by the complete blood count with differential and not just the white blood cell count alone --"@en
schema:description"Postoperative pain management -- Ensure postoperative deep breathing and incentive spirometry where appropriate, but chest physiotherapy adds relatively little value in reducing postoperative pulmonary complications -- Listen to your patients lungs postoperatively to assess for early complications and provide a baseline -- Remember the unique needs to ensure safety of the postoperative pediatric patient -- Remember the special needs of your postoperative elderly patients -- Know when and how to use a blood and fluid warning device -- Ensure the epiglottits is considered in patients with respiratory distress caused by an upper airway etiology since appropriate safety mechanisms need to be put in place -- Out of sight should be out of mind -- Be sure to have patients undress completely -- The nurse needs to be aware of uncommon medical conditions that present as common problems necrotizing fasciitis is one such condition -- Toxic shock when a foreign body can get you -- Know the common presenting complaints may be side effects of the patient's medications like oral contraceptives -- Esophageal varices always need to be considered in the patient presenting with an upper gastrointestinal bleeding -- A little honey can cause a lot of harm -- Act quick time can be muscle with a compartment syndrome -- Remember not all patients that act crazy are in fact crazy There may be important clinical conditions responsible for their condition that can be treated Wernicke encephalopathy is one such condition -- Know how and when to insert a nasogastric tube and when to avoid it -- Know what to do when your patient is assaulted by a snake in the grass -- Coma occurs from a number of different conditions In order to appropriately care for the patient these conditions need to be addressed quickly and specifically -- The skin is the window to the body and rashes may represent important systemic diseases -- Thoroughly search the acutely ill psychiatric patient being cared for in the emergency department -- Challenges to conscious sedation in the emergency department -- Know how to solicit embarrassing information during the triage history -- Do not forget to inquire about home remedies -- Always have a process to ensure that you have the right patient since it is the first step toward establishing a culture of safety in the emergency department -- Foley catheter use in post TURP patients leave it in Please -- Know that different dosing patterns exist for droperidol depending upon the indication -- Pathologic water intoxication in the emergency department -- The electronic medical record job security for nurses -- Know how to care for the patient with jimson weed and other hallucinogenic poisonings --"@en
schema:description"Oxygen rich atmosphere using a facemask and electrocautery during local anesthesia -- Preventing corneal damage to the unconscious patient -- Mark the correct surgical site -- Training in emergency airway placement is improved from exposure in the OR -- Patient satisfaction in the operating room -- Residents in the operating room do you know the ACGMEs competencies -- Anaphylaxis in the operating room -- Perioperative nursing how do you define it -- Intraoperative blood salvaging and bloodless surgery -- Meeting physician expectations do I ever do anything right -- Teamwork in the operating room huddle and debrief is this the OR or football -- Think critically in the operating room -- Assessing the patient for risk in the operating room -- Know how to assess for an impaired provider -- Do not let disruptive behavior in the operating room be the cause of harm to your patients -- Ostomy education is essential for the fresh ostomy patient -- Importance of dangling before activity in the postoperative patient -- Prevent wound disruption in obese patients -- Malignant hyperthermia in the PACU -- Frequent postoperative monitoring -- Pneumonectomy patients with chest tubes should not be placed on wall suction -- Activity levels for the total hip arthroplasty -- Common measures for safe cast care -- Remember that traction care requires observation of the pulley system and line of pull -- Ensure correct nasogastric tube placement -- Prevention of infection in orthopedic surgery patients is everyones job -- Know how to prevent infection in your burn patients -- Know that hyperbaric oxygen may help in complex wound care -- Failed back surgery syndrome -- Post op alcohol withdrawal syndrome -- Postoperative cognitive decline delirium is a real problem for patients and demands early identification by nurses -- Postoperative pain management in the elderly there are important things to remember -- Make the sponge count count -- Use incentive spiromentry in your postoperative surgery patient to prevent pulmonary complications -- Postoperative cardiothoracic surgery mobilization -- Postoperative cardiac surgery low cardiac output syndrome -- Postoperative cardiac surgery bleeding -- A postoperative arterial blood gas is only one parameter to assess postoperative respiratory function -- Perioperative cardiac ischemia is one worth paying attention to -- Postoperative stroke in the cardiac surgery patient -- Postoperative cardiac surgery dysrhythmias -- Is it possible that postoperative adhesions are the cause of your patients abdominal pain -- Postoperative paralytic ileus do not let it slow your patient down -- Postoperative urinary complications -- Be alert for surgical site infections in postoperative patients and remember that when the unfortunate occurrence of a wrong site side procedure occurs both surgical sites are at risk for infection --"@en
schema:description"-- Know the methods to reduce chemotherapy administration medication error -- Practice safe handling for all hazardous drug administration including oral drugs -- Use personal protective equipment for chemotherapy handling from beginning to end -- Carefully monitor the patients receiving high dose methotrexate to prevent toxicities -- Always confirm correct placement of a central venous access device that will not give a blood return before administering chemotherapy and blood products -- Always use current height and weight to verify chemotherapy doses -- Always verify that chemotherapy orders are complete The needs to include the appropriate hydration electrolytes premedications procedures and followup laboratory tests that should accompany the specific chemotherapeutic agent that is ordered -- In neutropenic oncology patients where the body's second line of defense is gone it is a good idea to protect the first of defense the skin -- Always verify that a patient understands patient education prior to initiating cancer treatment -- Always check lab values preoperatively for patients with leukemia who have received induction chemotherapy with extended lengths of stays -- Be aware of different dosing regimens of cytarbine -- Investigate any central venous access device CVAD without a blood return -- Patients receiving oral chemotherapy must stay on their prescribed regimens -- Eliminate accidental and fatal intrathecal vincristine administration -- Choose carefully peripheral IV site placement for chemotherapy infusions -- Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious oncologic emergency related to chemotherapy administration -- Know how to assess and evaluate patients in sickle cell crisis -- Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura can be a confusing condition Know how to connect the dots -- Transplant rejection -- Educate on cancer prevention -- Ensure appropriate screening for cervical cancer -- Know the conditions that predispose your patients to hypercoagulability -- Know what causes eosinophils to be elevated on the differential count -- Bone marrow transplantation is an important treatment modality for cancer and nurses need to be aware of the types reasons for their use and complications -- Lymph nodes do not always indicate that cancer is present -- Use proper personal protective equipment when caring for patients with head lice -- There is no need for mass hysteria or mass prophylaxis for aseptic meningitis -- Know how to prevent infection during your patients hospitalization -- Know how to prevent the transmission of shingles -- Do not forget the other side of infection control employees and volunteers --"@en
schema:description"Administer vitamin K and hepatitis B vaccines to the newborns -- Suction the mouth of the neonate before suctioning the nose -- Tell the obstetrician that you will ready the operating room after pop offs with a vacuum assisted delivery -- Frozen breast milk should be thawed quickly under running water or overnight in the refrigerator -- Notice persistent and increasing perineal pain in the postpartum patient -- Review the chart and patient history for risk factors of postpartum hemorrhage for early detection of uterine atony -- The nurse should give the measles mumps and rubella vaccine to the postpartum woman using the subcutaneous method -- Postpartum units are not intensive care areas -- Mothers of infants more than 23 weeks gestation have a milk supply ready to feed -- Know natural birth and its nuances before practicing high risk labor and delivery -- Take childbirth classes and read all the books -- Abdominal support after a cesarean section is a welcome gift -- Teach new mothers to read their babys cues -- Remember that pitocin can be dangerous -- Remember to consider and test for HELLP syndrome in patients with severe preeclampsia -- Remember to administer Rh immune globulin after miscarriage -- Know when to suspect and how to treat amniotic fluid embolism -- Preterm labor requires dedicated and supportive care for the mother and fetus -- Know the risks associated with common congenital malformations -- Teach every woman breast self examination you may save a life -- Use appropriate care in a speculum examination -- Know the signs and symptoms for an abusive relationship -- Endometriosis can mimic a number of acute intra abdominal processes -- Look at the placenta it may provide insights into what is wrong with the newborn -- Facilitate maternal infant bonding especially when there are risks to it -- Know how to support the adolescent female and her mother during her first gynecologic examination -- Know how to manage the acutely traumatized pregnant woman -- The nurse in the delivery room needs the knowledge a plan and the skills to care for a depressed newborn -- Know what to do to support high risk mothers with heart disease -- Know how to address third trimester bleeding -- Know how to obtain lab specimens from a newborn -- Know how to assess the newborn infant -- The APGAR score can provide an objective means of communicating a newborn infants status -- Remember that pregnancy is the most common cause of secondary amenorrhea -- Is your patient just tired or is there more to the story -- Know how to help your patients control the symptoms of menopause -- Always provide humidified oxygen for pediatric patients -- Use oral syringes to administer oral medications -- Use gloves with diaper changes --"@en
schema:description"Use pulse oximetry in children but remember that is also has limitations -- Label all patient tubes catheters and devices to ensure that routes are not confused -- Use capnography during pediatric conscious sedation -- Use emla to reduce painful venipuncture and venous cannulation in children -- Avoid the use of bicarbonate and bolus insulin in pediatric DKA -- Isolation precautions positive until proven negative for RSV -- Maintain thermoregulation during examination of the newborn -- Be careful when catheterizing an infants uncircumcised penis -- Use xylocaine jelly with urinary catheterization -- Check nasogastric tube placement prior to use -- Double check all pediatric chemotherapy -- Use appropriate protection for your immunosuppressed cancer patients including the avoidance of rectal temperatures -- Always place electrocardiogram EKG electrodes correctly -- Ensure that an emergency medication sheet is at the bedside of every patient -- Remember your units and do not misinterpret kilograms and pounds -- Remember your units and do not misinterpret micrograms and milligrams -- Pediatric lab results false interpretation and its consequences -- Decimal errors and miscalculations in pediatric drug dosing -- Ensure the correct size and placement of blood pressure cuffs in children -- Language barriers can jeopardize your patients safety -- Ensure that the pertinent sexual history is obtained on adolescent patients at admission -- Pediatric critical care lack of knowledge and skill in bedside EKG interpretation -- Marfan syndrome pay attention to the warning signs -- Back to sleep except in the PICU -- Strive to provide family centered care in the pediatric environment -- Be mindful of hair tourniquets -- Fentanyl is a very effective narcotic for use in the ICU however it can cause chest wall rigidity in patients when pushed too quickly -- Beware of Munchausens by proxy MSP in children who are thought to present repeatedly with vague complaints -- Ensure that your transport team is prepared for whatever might come in its way -- Intravenous IV access it is your friend but can also be your enemy -- Know how to handle the dislodged tracheostomy -- Ensure that your vital signs are correct -- Confirmatory bias pay attention bad things do happen to children ignoring the warning and looking for alternative reasons will not make it get better -- Remember how to dose medications for extremely overweight children -- Remember that hypovolemic shock is the most common type of shock in children and can occur from conditions as common as gastroenteritis and diarrhea -- Remember to obtain a digoxin level for children with dehydration or renal insufficiency who take the drug -- Remember that iron deficiency anemia is not the only cause of anemia in children -- Know that the child admitted with an acute injury will come back unless you educate the parent and the family on how to prevent injury -- Keep watching for the missed injuries in hospitalized pediatric patients with trauma -- Remember that the wheezing patient might have asthma or something else as well -- Remember the side rails on the crib -- Know that there are multiple causes for conjunctivitis -- Understand the danger of an acute asthma exacerbation -- Be mindful of the opportunities for a child to be poisoned during hospitalization -- Check the settings on the overbed warmers on hospitalized infants and monitor the patients temperature -- Ensure that you have the right patient"@en
schema:description"Know your insulin types -- Be careful when administering medications to kids in the emergency department -- Get the most use out of the equipment you use for patient care Its an ED not an ICU -- Methods for achieving hemostasis in the traumatic tongue laceration -- Infection control is critical for the modern day emergency department -- Considerations made in the sedation of those with impending neurologic or neurosurgical evaluation -- Murphys Law as it pertains to the checking for allergies -- Not all status epilepticus is associated with convulsions -- Allergies rash versus hives local versus systemic -- Triage is not over when the vital signs are taken -- Know the conditions that mimic abuse -- CPR get it right -- A team approach is needed in code situations in the emergency department -- Know when abdominal pain may indicate and ectopic pregnancy -- Drawing blood from the IV line time savers or not -- IV meds-how fast is too fast -- Locards principle and its application to the victim of violence -- Munchausen syndrome -- The baited trap overriding safety features of clinical alarms -- Know how to tell that the defibrillator is really synchronized -- Ensure that there is really a pulse with the rhythm on the monitor -- During transfers, always ensure that you have been given the right patient and report and are sending the right patient and report for more definitive care or procedures -- The emergency department ED does not need to provide all the care a patient needs but always needs to ensure that there is a plan for follow up and the patient understands what to do -- Ensure that the patients being discharged from the emergency department ED know what to do improve their care including medications diet and follow up -- Prior to methotrexate administration for ectopic pregnancy, the nurse must check the labs and verify the dose -- Term birth is not a crisis -- The most important person in the labor or birthing room is not a healthcare provider -- The perineum and introitus were built to pass a term fetus In the absence of extreme congenital needs of the fetus the perineum does not need help preparation or more room -- Laboring women believe what healthcare professionals tell them Tell them something nice about themselves -- Mothering is learned by watching -- It was called the urge to push before it was called laboring down -- The nurse should give Depo Provera medroxyprogesterone acetate using the Z track intramuscular injection method -- The nurse should encourage open glottis breathing during stage 2 of labor and delivery -- Assess the blood pressure of a woman in labor in between the contractions -- Assess the blood pressure of a pregnant woman in the lateral position -- Take prenatal vitamins with beverages that do not contain caffeine and not coffee or milk -- A pregnant woman should perform shoulder relaxation and pelvic tilt exercises for back pain -- Cup one hand against the uterus at the symphysis pubis when massaging an atonic uterus -- To express clots from a uterus after massaging for an atonic uterus for postpartum hemorrhage provides pressure over the lower uterine segment --"@en
schema:description"Twenty students present with nausea vomiting and diarrhea do not assume is it food poisoning -- Comply with hand hygiene guidelines what you do not see is what you or your patient can get -- Know how to manage an infectious diseases outbreak -- Ensure that patient care equipment like hoyer lift pads and linens are laundered by the hospitals laundry and not taken home by staff for laundering as a nice gesture -- The joint commission is here What's our policy on -- Know the basics of infection control -- Know that isolation is not a mystery but that there are clear guidelines -- Know the basics of MRSA and how to care for patients with the infection -- Know the basics of clostridium difficile C difficile to protect your patients -- Know how to care for patients with VRE -- Dialysis catheters vas caths contain large amounts of heparin -- Potassium can be lethal -- Know how to detect urinary retention -- Know the value of an anion gap when your patient has a metabolic acidosis -- Acute renal failure has many causes but ruling out an obstructed urinary system is the first order of business -- Know what to do for patients with nephrotic syndrome -- Know what to do to identify and correct hypomagnesemia -- Know what to do to identify and correct hyponatremia -- Know what your dialysis patients experience and how to help them -- My patient is not urinating information to gather before calling the doctor -- Foley catheters does my patient really need one -- Save the stone for your renal colic patient it may provide the diagnosis -- Ensure good control of your patients blood pressure the kidney may be the cause but it is more likely that is will bear the brunt of uncontrolled blood pressure -- Urine infections mean different things to different patients -- Patients with prostate cancer have a number of treatment options -- Not all headaches are created equal -- Ensure that your spinal cord injury patient knows how to care for bowel and bladder concerns -- Know how to care for the patient with status epilepticus -- Know how to care for the postictal patient with new seizures -- Know the importance of ensuring that myasthenia gravis patients receive their medications in a timely manner -- Know how to manage the nonphysical aspects of traumatic brain injury of your patients and their family -- Traumatic brain injury victims require help beyond their physical needs -- Ensure that neurologically impaired patients with an epidural hemorrhage are monitored effectively -- Patients undergoing conscious sedation should be closely monitored for prolonged effects of medication especially once the procedures are completed -- Know how to prevent nerve compression syndromes -- Know that the stroke patient has a number of nursing needs that can pose safety concerns if they are unaddressed -- Autonomic dysreflexia does happen know how to respond when it happens to your spinal cord injury patient -- Watch for respiratory failure in patients with Guillain Barre syndrome --"@en
schema:description"Nursing retention begins with assuring appropriate support for the bedside nurse -- Take care of yourself you will be a better nurse and your patients will receive better care Pause to find space to be still every day -- Traveling nurses need to plan the care they want to provide for their patients from the foundation up -- Know your emotional IQ -- Cultural awareness in healthcare -- Assess your patients health literacy -- Use simulation to assist in educating and practicing your craft practice makes perfect and may prevent harm to a patient -- Provide interprofessional educational experiences for your nurses you may be surprised by what they and the doctors learn -- Goal setting for professional nursing -- Negotiation and conflict resolution are critical to teach your staff -- Know how to manage a bad event that occurs on your units -- Caring for staff and reporting appropriately -- Keeping our patients satisfied with their care -- Know how to avoid workplace violence -- Support your staff through continued professional growth opportunities -- Remember that the new intern on the floor who thinks he knows everything was in diapers or at least middle school when you graduated from nursing school -- Know which doctor to call -- Follow the policy and procedure -- Practice strict confidentiality to make it a habit -- Remember that cutting costs for a particular patient does not solve the healthcare financial crisis -- Ensure that patients get treated equitably -- Know your patients PT INR before giving Coumadin -- Never give oral meds via IV access know your routes -- Proper administration of enoxaparin lovenox injectable -- Before administering insulin make sure you know whose blood sugar you are treating -- Patients with penicillin allergies may safely take antibiotics from other drug classes -- Be extra vigilant with close sounding drug names -- Beware of drugs with similar sounding names or similar appearing packaging -- Administering medication through a feeding tube -- Precipitate in the syringe is a warning sign not to give the medication -- Drugs with narrow therapeutic index are affected by changes in diet health condition or other medications and need to be monitored carefully -- Patient controlled analgesic pump settings require independent two-nurse verification -- Hydromorphone IV concentration is up to seven times that of IV morphine -- Administering monoclonal antibodies Know the signs of hypersensitivity -- Dont forget to calculate dose concentrations when calculating rituxan titrations -- Second nurse verification of dose and rate is a simple cost effective measure to reduce medication errors with high risk drugs -- Always use two patient identifiers prior to administering medications --"@en
schema:description"Patients who are suspected of becoming detoxified during their hospital stay should be started on CIWA protocol for improved outcomes -- Patients with psychiatric problems can get admitted to any unit in the hospital a little training can go a long way -- Pediatric nurses should be trained to recognize postpartum depression -- Know how to manage the confused patient without restraints -- Remember that your depressed patients may have a medical reason for their depression -- Healthcare providers must develop an appreciation for the patients fear and anxiety generated by tests procedures and diagnosis -- Alcohol abuse and isolation are a deadly combination in geriatric patients Consider a call to protective services it could save a life -- Know how to identify and manage the patient with violent behavior tendencies -- Know how to help the client in crisis -- Know how to assess alcoholism in your medical patients -- Know how to care for the elderly patient with dementia -- Know that vital signs need to be interpreted individually and as trends to appropriately understand the patients condition -- Remember to take blood pressures correctly they affect the prescribed care -- Understand the patients condition prior to holding medications based on BP alone -- When in doubt get a 12 lead EKG Lead II is not always the best lead for interpretation -- Dont just say all clear LOOK -- Recheck the femoral puncture site postcardiac catheterization after vigorous coughing gagging or vomiting even if it is not time for vital signs -- Do not assume it cannot be VT just because the patient is still standing -- Do not assume that a patient is on a low sodium diet just because he or she says oh we dont eat any sodium -- Patient monitors nurses best friends or enemies -- Do not jump to conclusions with chest pain before performing a thorough assessment -- Remember that women also get heart disease but often present with atypical symptoms -- Do not use an AED on a person who is speaking to you -- Know where your emergency equipment is and how to use it -- Patients develop heart failure from structural problems with their heart and the nurse can often help to identify the etiology -- Remember the other arterial vessels affected by atherosclerosis -- Always close the stopcock to an arterial line after drawing blood and flushing the line -- Radial arterial lines and BP cuffs do not belong on the same arm -- Ensure safe patient transfers of critically ill patients -- An understanding of ARDS is important for the nurse to effectively plan care for the critically ill patient -- DIC requires special nursing considerations -- Caring for the patient with shock -- Transducer leveling is critical for ensuring appropriate interventions --"@en
schema:description"Creutzfeldt Jakob disease is a rare cause of progressive neurologic deterioration and should be considered in the patient demonstrating worsening status -- Unilateral facial symptoms may reflect either Bells palsy on trigeminal neuralgia -- Remember that adequate oxygenation is critical to our patients and knowing when they are getting into trouble is important for preventing complications -- Remember that there are a number of signs and symptoms for respiratory system problems but there is also considerable overlap between these signs and symptoms and the diseases causing them -- Remember that an elevated PCO2 alone is not necessarily an urgent problem for the patient -- Remember that sometimes what you do not hear is more important that what you do hear -- Know that steroids are the key to unlocking the treatment for asthma -- Know how to manage your patient with a tracheostomy -- Wear a face shield when suctioning -- Know the signs and symptoms of pulmonary embolism they may be nonspecific -- Know the excessive oxygen therapy in the COPD patient may lead to respiratory failure -- Know the risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea in your patients -- When shaving a ventilated intubated patient, always ensure that the balloon of the ET tube or tracheal has been moved out of the way of the razor -- Air is yellow and oxygen is green -- The multiple faces of pneumothorax -- Know how oxygen affects CO2 in patients with chronic lung disease -- Pneumonia can be a bigger problem than you think get the antibiotics in quickly -- Importance of preoperative teaching for patients and families -- Preoperative use of herbal preparations if you do not ask they will not tell -- Preoperative use of diet pills another Do not ask will not tell -- Discontinue medications before surgery -- Medications for erectile dysfunction and the preoperative patient -- Make sure your preoperative patient is NPO -- Remove jewelry preoperatively to prevent swelling and burns -- Allergies to latex how do you know -- Informed consent is the patient really informed -- Know the problems associated with bowel preparation prior to endoscopy -- Prepare the patient for what to expect during operative care -- Educate patients prior to chest tube removal to avoid being punched -- The importance of the preoperative phone call -- Prepare the patient for surgery both physically and emotionally -- Ensure that the patients undergoing surgery maintain their identity --"@en
schema:description"Know how to care for a urinary catheter -- Remember timely pain management -- Ensure appropriate position of the dobhoff tube prior to feeding -- Know the proper care of a peripheral IV site -- Distractions can lead to medication errors -- Know how to identify patients -- Identifying patients with latex allergy -- Know how to reach the attending physician -- Verbal orders should never be routine always read back and wait for confirmation -- When you are in the patients and loved ones presence you are not invisible or sly Remember they are hypersensitive to your expressions your tone and your activities They hold what you dont do in the same regard as what you do -- Healthcare providers must address end of life issues honestly to give patients optimal care -- The proper removal of urinary catheters is necessary to avoid harm to the patient -- Improve nurse physician communication to improve patient outcomes -- To prevent injury use equipment for the purpose for which it was intended -- Nurse preceptors teaching the next generation of nurses -- Machines alarm patients do not Nothing is more important than the necessity for routine assessments -- Aseptic technique and common sense can help prevent IV site complications -- Avoid incomplete documentation of the patients hospitalization -- Ensure corrections in documentation errors -- Avoid plagiarism in your documentation -- Trust your instincts you know your patient -- Use restraints appropriately -- Reddened bony prominences should not be rubbed -- Use care when charting do not confuse for it could make a big difference to the patient -- Ensure that your patients IV has been removed prior to discharge -- Wash your hands before and after you touch the patient -- Aspirate from central lines and PICC lines before using -- Know how to care for peripherally inserted central catheters to prevent infection -- Cleaning peripherally inserted central catheters -- Keep newsworthy patient information confidential -- Microwave can be dangerous -- Know where your telemetry patient is at all times -- The importance of educating patients and family members to prevent a fall after sedating medication -- Educate families about common dangers in the confused and medically unstable patient -- Ensure that invasive procedures get appropriate site verification outside of the OR -- Move from a blame free to an accountable patient safety culture -- Do not assume that an endstage patient does not want aggressive therapy -- Do not assume an advanced directive always means the patient wants to be a DNR in all circumstances -- The hospital is no place to be when youre sick Help to get your patients moving on the path to discharge -- Know how to care for the over sedated patient on a PCA -- Death comes in a variety of forms and it is important for the nurse to understand the differences -- Know how to manage the combative client and provide safe care -- Preprocedure and postprocedure care for the patient receiving ECT -- Know how to care for the patient with a borderline personality disorder -- Know how to care for the bipolar patient --"@en
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schema:name"Avoiding common nursing errors"@en
schema:numberOfPages"547"
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schema:reviewBody""This handbook succinctly describes over 500 common errors made by nurses and offers practical, easy-to-remember tips for avoiding these errors. Coverage includes the entire scope of nursing practice - administration, medications, process of care, behavioral and psychiatric, cardiology, critical care, endocrine, gastroenterology and nutrition, hematology-oncology, infectious diseases, nephrology, neurology, pulmonary, preoperative, operative, and postoperative care, emergency nursing, obstetrics and gynecology, and pediatric nursing. The book can easily be read immediately before the start of a rotation or used for quick reference." "Each error is described in a quick-reading one-page entry that includes a brief clinical scenario and tips on how to avoid or resolve the problem. Illustrations are included where appropriate."--BOOK JACKET."
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