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A balanced introduction to computer science

Author: David Reed, Ph. D.
Publisher: Boston : Prentice Hall, 2011.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 3rd edView all editions and formats
Summary:
Synopsis: A Balanced Introduction to Computer Science, 3rd edition is ideal for Introduction to Computing and the Web courses in departments of Math and Computer Science. This thoughtfully written text uses the Internet as a central theme, studying its history, technology, and current use. Experimental problems use Web-based tools, enabling students to learn programming fundamentals by developing their own  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Reed, Ph. D.
ISBN: 9780132166751 0132166755
OCLC Number: 657223762
Description: xx, 398 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Contents: Preface --
1: Computer Basics: --
What is a computer? --
Hardware --
Central Processing Unit (CPU) --
Memory --
Input/output devices (I/O) --
Software --
Operating systems --
Internet and the Web --
Web browsers and servers --
Web addresses --
Accessing local pages --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Review questions --
References --
2: HTML And Web Pages: --
HTML basics --
HTML tags --
HTML elements --
Document formatting --
Text spacing --
Headings and alignment --
Font formatting --
Hypertext and multimedia --
Hyperlinks --
Images --
Lists --
Formatting lists --
Tables --
Table borders --
Table alignment --
Making pages publicly viewable --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Supplemental material and exercises --
3: Internet And The Web: --
History of the Internet --
ARPANet --
Growth and privatization --
How the Internet works --
Distributed network --
Packet switching --
Internet protocols: TCP/IP --
Domain names --
History of the Web --
Hypertext and the Web --
Mainstream adoption of the Web --
Web growth --
How the Web works --
HTML --
Web protocol: HTTP --
Caching --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Review questions --
Endnotes --
References --
4: Javascript And Dynamic Web Pages: --
Dynamic Web pages --
HTML event handlers --
onclick event handler --
Interaction via buttons --
Input buttons --
Dynamic text within a page --
Alert windows --
innerHTML attribute --
Example: Quotations page --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Supplemental material and exercises --
5: Javascript And User Interaction: --
User input via text boxes --
Text box element --
Example: Form letter page --
JavaScript variables --
Variables for reusing values --
Example: Fill-in-the-blank story --
Variables for temporary values --
Web pages that compute --
JavaScript numbers and expressions --
Number representation --
Text boxes and parseFloat --
Example: Grade calculation --
Programming errors and debugging --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Supplemental material and exercises. 6: History Of Computers: --
Generation 0: mechanical computers (1642-1645) --
Programmable devices --
Electromagnetic relays --
Generation 1: Vacuum tubes (1945-1954) --
Computing and World War II --
von Neumann architecture --
Generation 2: Transistors (1954-1963) --
High-level programming languages --
Generation 3: Integrated circuits (1963-1973) --
Large scale integration --
Computing for businesses --
Generation 4: VLSI (1973-1985) --
Personal computer revolution --
Object-oriented programming --
Generation 5: Parallel processing & networking (1985-???) --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Review questions --
Endnotes --
References --
7: Functions And Randomness: --
Predefined JavaScript functions --
Math functions --
Raising numbers to a power --
Generating random numbers --
Simple user-defined functions --
Functions that simplify --
Randomness in a page --
Example: Simulated dice --
Example: Random slide show --
Example: Random banner ads --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Supplemental material and exercises --
8: Algorithms And Programming Languages: --
Algorithms --
Algorithms in the real world --
Designing and analyzing algorithms --
Alternative algorithm --
Algorithm analysis --
Big-oh notation --
Algorithm example: Searching a list --
Sequential search --
Binary search --
Algorithm analysis --
Algorithm example: approximating a square root --
Algorithm analysis --
Algorithms and programming --
Machine languages --
High-level languages --
Program translation --
Interpreters and compilers --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Review questions --
References --
9: Abstraction And Libraries: --
Structure of functions --
Local variables --
Functions with inputs --
Multiple inputs --
Functions that return values --
Function libraries --
random_js Library --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Supplemental material and exercises. 10: Computer Science As A Discipline: --
Computer "science" --
Artificial science --
Computer science themes --
Hardware --
Software --
Theory --
Subfields of computer science --
Algorithms and data structures --
Architecture --
Operating systems and networks --
Software engineering --
Artificial intelligence and robotics --
Bioinformatics --
Ethics of computing --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Review questions --
Endnotes --
References --
11: Conditional Execution: --
If statements --
Boolean tests --
Nested If statements --
Cascading If-Else statements --
Example: Dice simulations --
Counters --
Boolean expressions --
Example: Slot machine --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Supplemental material and exercises --
12: Data Representation: --
Analog vs digital --
Binary numbers --
Representing integers --
Representing real numbers --
Representing characters and strings --
Representing other types of data --
Sounds --
Images --
Movies --
How computers distinguish among data types --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Review questions --
References --
13: Conditional Repetition: --
While loops --
Avoiding redundancy --
Example: Lottery combinations --
Counter-driven loops --
Variables and repetition --
Example: Generating hailstone sequences --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Supplemental material and exercises --
14: Inside The-Computer-The Von Neumann Architecture: --
CPU subunits and datapath --
CPU subunits --
CPU datapath cycles --
Datapath simulator --
CPU and main memory --
Transferring data to and from main memory --
Datapath with memory simulator --
Stored-program computer --
Machine languages --
Control unit --
Stored-program computer simulator --
Role of input/output devices --
Machine vs assembly languages --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Review questions --
References --
15: JavaScript Strings: --
Strings as objects --
Properties and methods --
Common string-manipulation methods --
String concatenation --
Searching strings --
General searches --
String manipulations and repetition --
Example: Recognizing palindromes --
Example: Substitution ciphers --
Encoding messages --
Decoding messages --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Supplemental material and exercises --
16: Inside The Computer-Transistors And Integrated Circuits: --
Electricity and switches --
Electricity basics --
Switches --
Transistors --
Transistors as switches --
From transistors to gates --
Gates and binary logic --
From gates to complex circuits --
Example: Designing memory circuitry --
From circuits to microchips --
Integrated circuit --
Manufacturing integrated circuits --
Packaging microchips --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Review questions --
References. 17: JavaScript Arrays: --
Arrays as objects --
Accessing items in an array --
Assigning items in an array --
From strings to arrays --
Split method for strings --
Example: Generating acronyms --
Arrays of numbers --
Example: Maintaining dice statistics (Approach 1) --
Example: Maintaining dice statistics (Approach 2) --
Example: ASCII animations --
Looking ahead --
Chapter summary --
Supplemental material and exercises --
18: Computers And Society: --
Positive impact of technology --
Computers and programs for everyday tasks --
Internet and Web as information sources --
Internet and Web as communication media --
Internet and Web for commerce --
Potential dangers of technology --
Reliance on complex systems --
Information overload --
Privacy and security --
Digital divide --
Looking beyond --
Chapter summary --
Review questions --
Endnotes --
References --
Appendix A: Browser basics --
Appendix B: Common text editors --
Appendix C: HTML reference --
Appendix D: JavaScript reference --
Appendix E: random_js Library --
Appendix F: time_js Library --
Appendix G: arrays_js Library --
Index --
Credits --
Trademark information.
Responsibility: David Reed.

Abstract:

Synopsis: A Balanced Introduction to Computer Science, 3rd edition is ideal for Introduction to Computing and the Web courses in departments of Math and Computer Science. This thoughtfully written text uses the Internet as a central theme, studying its history, technology, and current use. Experimental problems use Web-based tools, enabling students to learn programming fundamentals by developing their own interactive Web pages with HTML and JavaScript. Integrating breadth-based and depth-based chapters, Reed covers a broad range of topics balanced with programming depth in a hands-on, tutorial style.

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"The textbook [Reed] explains a concept, shows the code, then give a pictorial example to reinforce that point. An excellent example is in chapter four when talking about ONMOUSEOVER and ONMOUSEOUT." Read more...

 
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