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Basic linguistic theory. Volume 3, Further grammatical topics

Author: Robert M W Dixon
Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Basic Linguistic Theory provides a fundamental characterization of the nature of human languages and a comprehensive guide to their description and analysis. In crystal-clear prose, R.M.W. Dixon describes how to go about doing linguistics. He show how grammatical structures and rules may be worked out on the basis of inductive generalisations, and explains the steps by which an attested grammar and lexicon can built
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Dixon, Robert M.W.
Basic linguistic theory Volume 3, Further grammatical topics.
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Robert M W Dixon
ISBN: 9780191623677 0191623679
OCLC Number: 813529020
Description: 1 online resource (xx, 547 pages) : illustrations
Contents: Cover --
Contents --
List of tables --
How to read this book --
Preface --
Abbreviations and conventions --
19. Non-spatial setting --
19.1. Introduction --
19.2. Outline of parameters --
19.2.1. The status of future --
19.2.2. A note on terminology --
19.3. Tense --
19.3.1. Temporal realization of tense --
19.3.2. Markedness and neutralization --
19.3.3. Spaceandtime --
19.3.4. Lexical time words --
19.4. Realis and irrealis --
19.4.1. Modalities --
19.5. Degreeofcertainty --
19.6. Phase of activity --
19.7. Completion-perfect and imperfect --
19.8. Boundedness-telic and atelic --
19.9. Temporal extent-punctual and durative --
19.10. Composition-perfective and imperfective --
19.10.1. Aspect --
19.11. Frequency and degree --
19.12. Speed and ease --
19.13. Evidentiality --
19.14. Summary --
19.15. What toinvestigate --
Sources and notes --
20. Number systems --
20.1. Introduction --
20.2. Size of systems --
absolute and relative reference --
20.2.1. Collective, distributive, and associative --
20.3. Obligatory and optional number systems --
20.4. Mixed systems --
20.5. Realization --
20.6. Wherenumber is shown --
20.6.1. Pronouns --
20.6.2. Demonstratives and interrogative words --
20.6.3. Nounphrases --
20.6.4. Verbs --
20.7. Markedness --
20.8. Interrelations with other grammatical categories --
20.9. Lexical number words and counting --
20.9.1. Developing and borrowing number words --
20.9.2. Grammatical status of lexical number words --
20.9.3. Verb 'count' and noun 'number' --
20.10. Historical development --
20.11. Summary --
20.12. What to investigate --
Sources and notes --
21. Negation --
21.1. Introduction --
21.2. Negation of main clause --
21.2.1. Shown by syntactic particles --
21.2.2. Shown by morphological processes --
21.2.3. Requiring an auxiliary verb --
21.2.4. Negator as a main verb --
21.2.5. Multiple marking of a negation. 21.2.6. Negation in copula and verbless clauses --
21.2.7. Negative imperatives --
21.2.8. Grammatical features --
21.3. Scope --
21.3.1. Negating a subordinate clause --
21.3.2. Negating a clausal constituent --
21.3.3. Negation within an NP --
21.4. Negativewords --
21.4.1. Negative indefinites --
21.4.2. Inherently negative lexemes --
21.4.3. Deriving negative lexemes --
21.5. Doublenegation --
21.6. Tags --
21.7. Dependencies with other grammatical systems --
21.8. Independent polarity forms, 'no' and 'yes' --
21.9. Summary --
21.10. What toinvestigate --
Sources and notes --
22. Reflexive and reciprocal constructions --
22.1. Introduction --
22.2. Meanings --
22.2.1. The semantics of reflexives --
22.2.2. The semantics of reciprocals --
22.3. Preliminary generalizations --
22.4. The pronoun technique --
22.4.1. Transitivity --
22.4.2. Coreference possibilities --
22.4.3. Forms --
22.4.4. Extended meanings of reflexive and reciprocal pronouns --
22.4.5. Reflexives -self and own in English --
22.4.6. Reciprocal pronouns each other and one another in English --
22.5. The verbal derivation technique --
22.5.1. Range of functions and meanings --
22.5.2. Coreference possibilities and transitivity --
22.6. Other techniques --
22.7. Combining techniques --
22.8. Inherently reciprocal and inherently reflexive verbs --
22.9. Origins, space and time --
22.10. Summary --
22.11. What to investigate --
Sources and notes --
23. Pivots, passives and antipassives --
23.1. Topic and pivot --
23.2. Passives and antipassives --
23.2.1. Types of marking --
23.2.2. Which arguments may become S --
23.2.3. Argument moved out of the core --
23.2.4. Rationale --
23.2.5. Meanings --
23.2.6. Non-canonical passive and antipassives --
23.2.7. What is not a passive or antipassive --
23.3. Summary --
23.4. What to investigate --
Sources and notes --
24. Causatives. 24.1. Introduction --
24.2. Formal mechanisms --
24.2.1. Morphological processes --
24.2.2. Two verbs in one predicate --
24.2.3. Periphrastic causatives --
24.2.4. Lexical causatives --
24.2.5. Exchanging auxiliaries --
24.3. Syntax --
24.3.1. Of intransitives --
24.3.2. Of transitives --
24.3.3. Of extended transitives --
24.3.4. Double causatives --
24.4. Semantics --
24.5. Meaning-mechanism correlations --
24.6. Other meanings, other functions --
24.6.1. Causatives which don't cause --
24.6.2. Multi-functional forms --
24.7. Summary --
24.8. What toinvestigate --
Sources and notes --
25. Applicatives --
25.1. Canonical applicative derivations --
25.2. Quasi-applicatives --
25.3. Meanings --
25.3.1. Goal --
25.3.2. Instrumental --
25.3.3. Comitative --
25.3.4. Locative --
25.4. Applicative arrays --
25.5. Syntax --
25.5.1. Peripheral functions for applicative arguments --
25.5.2. What happens to the original O? --
25.5.3. The role of bound pronouns --
25.5.4. Several applicatives together --
25.6. Functions --
25.7. Further realizations --
25.8. Other functions, other meanings --
25.9. Terminology --
25.10. Summary --
25.11. What toinvestigate --
Sources and notes --
26. Comparative constructions --
26.1. The prototypical comparative scheme --
26.2. Mono-clausal comparative constructions --
26.2.1. Type A1 --
26.2.2. Type A1-si --
26.2.3. Type A2 --
26.2.4. Type A2-si --
26.2.5. Type B --
26.2.6. Types C and D --
26.2.7. Type E --
26.3. Further grammatical means --
26.3.1. Bi-clausal comparative constructions (type F) --
26.3.2. Comparative strategies (type S) --
26.3.3. Languages employing more than one grammatical means --
26.4. 'More', 'less', and 'the same as' --
26.5. Comparative and superlative --
26.6. Inherently comparative lexemes --
26.7. Other schemes of comparison --
26.7.1. Correlative comparative --
26.8. How they may come about. 26.8.1. Directionsoforigin --
26.8.2. Diffusion and spread --
26.9. Summary --
26.10. What to investigate --
Sources and notes --
27. Questions --
27.1. Confirmation or information-polar and content questions --
27.2. Two sample languages --
27.3. Interrogative mood inflection --
27.4. Similar marking for polar and content questions --
27.5. Polar questions --
27.5.1. Marking --
27.5.2. Polar question with focus --
27.5.3. Types of polar question --
27.5.4. Alternative questions --
27.6. Content questions --
27.6.1. Indefinites and interrogatives --
27.6.2. The syntax of content questions --
27.6.3. The forms of interrogative words --
27.6.4. Types of interrogative word --
27.6.5. Interrogative words as markers of relative --
27.7. Interrelations with other grammatical categories --
27.8. Pragmatic aspects --
27.9. Summary --
27.10. What toinvestigate --
Sources and notes --
28. Language and the world-explanations now and needed --
28.1. What we can say --
28.2. Why things are the way they are --
28.2.1. Habitual activities --
28.2.2. Social organization and kinship --
28.2.3. Religion --
28.2.4. Ways of viewing the world --
28.2.5. Modes of speaking --
28.2.6. Large and small language communities --
28.3. The challenge ahead --
Sources and notes --
Appendix 1 Source materials --
Appendix 2 How many languages? --
Glossary --
A --
B --
C --
D --
E --
F --
G --
H --
I --
L --
M --
N --
O --
P --
Q --
R --
S --
T --
U --
V --
W --
Y --
Z --
References --
Author Index --
A --
B --
C --
D --
E --
F --
G --
H --
I --
J --
K --
L --
M --
N --
O --
P --
Q --
R --
S --
T --
U --
V --
W --
X --
Y --
Z --
Language Index --
A --
B --
C --
D --
E --
F --
G --
H --
I --
J --
K --
L --
M --
N --
O --
P --
Q --
R --
S --
T --
U --
V --
W --
X --
Y --
Z --
Subject Index --
A --
B --
C --
D --
E --
F --
G --
H --
I --
J --
K --
L --
M --
N --
O --
P --
Q --
R --
S. T --
U --
V --
W --
Y --
Z.
Other Titles: Further grammatical topics
Responsibility: R.M.W. Dixon.

Abstract:

R. M. W. Dixon provides a comprehensive guide to the nature of human languages and their description and analysis. The volumes comprise a one-stop introduction for undergraduate and graduate students  Read more...

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These books are monumental and destined to become classics, equatable to the two volumes entitled Language by Sapir (1921) and Bloomfield (1933), and to Givon's Syntax, volumes 1 (1984) and 2 (1990) Read more...

 
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