skip to content
The Bastille : a history of a symbol of despotism and freedom Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The Bastille : a history of a symbol of despotism and freedom

Author: Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink; Rolf Reichardt; Norbert Schürer
Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 1997.
Series: Bicentennial reflections on the French Revolution.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This book is both an analysis of the Bastille as cultural paradigm and a case study on the history of French political culture. It examines in particular the storming and subsequent fall of the Bastille in Paris on July 14, 1789 and how it came to represent the cornerstone of the French Revolution, becoming a symbol of the repression of the Old Regime. Lüsebrink and Reichardt use this semiotic reading of the  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Lüsebrink, Hans-Jürgen.
Bastille.
Durham : Duke University Press, 1997
(OCoLC)649111909
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink; Rolf Reichardt; Norbert Schürer
ISBN: 0822318946 9780822318941 0822319020 9780822319023
OCLC Number: 36084200
Description: xv, 304 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Contents: 1. Genesis of a Political Symbol: The Bastille, 1715-1789. Anti-Bastille Journalism: Scandalous Stories of Prisoners. The Reality-Forming Power of the Symbolic: Prison Practice versus Social Consciousness --
2. The Storming of the Bastille: The Historical Event as Collective Symbolic Action. The Storming of the Bastille: Causes and Process. How a Decisive Event in World History Is "Made": The Symbolic Exaggeration of 14 July 1789 --
3. Revolutionary Symbolism under the Sign of the Bastille, 1789-1799: A Prime Example of the Self-Mystification of the French Revolution. Radicalization and Diversification of a Collective Symbol. The New Heroes: The Role-Model Function and Self-Staging of the Victors of the Bastille.
Series Title: Bicentennial reflections on the French Revolution.
Other Titles: Bastille.
Responsibility: Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink and Rolf Reichardt ; translated by Norbert Schürer.

Abstract:

This book is both an analysis of the Bastille as cultural paradigm and a case study on the history of French political culture. It examines in particular the storming and subsequent fall of the Bastille in Paris on July 14, 1789 and how it came to represent the cornerstone of the French Revolution, becoming a symbol of the repression of the Old Regime. Lüsebrink and Reichardt use this semiotic reading of the Bastille to reveal how historical symbols are generated; what these symbolsʹ functions are in the collective memory of societies; and how they are used by social, political, and ideological groups. To facilitate the symbolic nature of the investigation, this analysis of the evolving signification of the Bastille moves from the French Revolution to the nineteenth century to contemporary history. The narrative also shifts from France to other cultural arenas, like the modern European colonial sphere, where the overthrow of the Bastille acquired radical new signification in the decolonization period of the 1940s and 1950s. The Bastille demonstrates the potency of the interdisciplinary historical research that has characterized the end of this century, combining quantitative and qualitative approaches, and taking its methodological tools from history, sociology, linguistics, and cultural and literary studies. -- Publisher description.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/36084200>
library:oclcnum"36084200"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/36084200>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Bastille (Paris, France)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Révolutions--Mythologie."
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Symbolisme en politique--France."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Revolution (France : 1789-1799)"
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Symbolisme en politique--France."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:author
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:datePublished"1997"
schema:description"This book is both an analysis of the Bastille as cultural paradigm and a case study on the history of French political culture. It examines in particular the storming and subsequent fall of the Bastille in Paris on July 14, 1789 and how it came to represent the cornerstone of the French Revolution, becoming a symbol of the repression of the Old Regime. Lüsebrink and Reichardt use this semiotic reading of the Bastille to reveal how historical symbols are generated; what these symbolsʹ functions are in the collective memory of societies; and how they are used by social, political, and ideological groups. To facilitate the symbolic nature of the investigation, this analysis of the evolving signification of the Bastille moves from the French Revolution to the nineteenth century to contemporary history. The narrative also shifts from France to other cultural arenas, like the modern European colonial sphere, where the overthrow of the Bastille acquired radical new signification in the decolonization period of the 1940s and 1950s. The Bastille demonstrates the potency of the interdisciplinary historical research that has characterized the end of this century, combining quantitative and qualitative approaches, and taking its methodological tools from history, sociology, linguistics, and cultural and literary studies. -- Publisher description."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/626276>
schema:genre"History."
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The Bastille : a history of a symbol of despotism and freedom"
schema:numberOfPages"304"
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.