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Before intimacy : asocial sexuality in early modern England

Author: Daniel Juan Gil
Publisher: Minneapolis, Minn. ; London : University of Minnesota Press, ©2006.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Daniel Juan Gil examines sixteenth-century English literary concepts of sexuality that frame erotic ties as neither bound by social customs nor transgressive of them, but rather as "loopholes" in people's associations. Engaging Sidney's Astrophil and Stella, Spenser's The Faerie Queene, and Shakespeare's Sonnets, among others Gil demonstrates how sexuality was conceived as a relationship system not institutionalized  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Gil, Daniel Juan.
Before intimacy.
Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, ©2006
(DLC) 2005021946
(OCoLC)61228643
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Daniel Juan Gil
ISBN: 9780816697588 0816697582
OCLC Number: 191935634
Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 187 pages)
Contents: The social structure of passion --
Intimacy and the eroticism of social distance : Sidney's Astrophil and Stella and Spenser's Amoretti --
Civility and the emotional topography of The Faerie queene --
At the limits of the social world : fear and pride in Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida --
Poetic autonomy and the history of sexuality in Shakespeare's sonnets.
Responsibility: Daniel Juan Gil.

Abstract:

Daniel Juan Gil examines sixteenth-century English literary concepts of sexuality that frame erotic ties as neither bound by social customs nor transgressive of them, but rather as "loopholes" in people's associations. Engaging Sidney's Astrophil and Stella, Spenser's The Faerie Queene, and Shakespeare's Sonnets, among others Gil demonstrates how sexuality was conceived as a relationship system not institutionalized in a domestic realm.
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