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Berlin airlift : air bridge to freedom

Author: Lee Burcham; Michael E Lynch; U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
Publisher: Carlisle Barracks, PA : U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, 2010.
Series: Perspectives in military history
Edition/Format:   eVideo : National government publication : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
At the conclusion of the Second World War, the leaders of the victorious powers convened to negotiate the necessary protocols, territorial occupancy agreements, rites of passage, and myriad other details as to how Germany was to be governed. Generally, the powers agreed that Germany would be treated as an entity and not as a partitioned state. As time passed, however, it became apparent that the occupation of  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Internet Resource, Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Lee Burcham; Michael E Lynch; U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
OCLC Number: 668413402
Notes: Lecture held September 15, 2010 in Ridgway Hall, U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
Title from title frames (viewed on October 6, 2010).
Performer(s): Presenter, Lee Burcham ; introduced by Michael Lynch.
Description: 1 streaming video file (77 min.) : digital, WMV file
Details: Mode of access: Internet from U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center web site. Windows Media Player required.
Series Title: Perspectives in military history
Responsibility: Lee Burcham.

Abstract:

At the conclusion of the Second World War, the leaders of the victorious powers convened to negotiate the necessary protocols, territorial occupancy agreements, rites of passage, and myriad other details as to how Germany was to be governed. Generally, the powers agreed that Germany would be treated as an entity and not as a partitioned state. As time passed, however, it became apparent that the occupation of Germany was not only costly to the victors but also was increasingly harmful to the prospects for a recovered, democratic state as a member of the European community once again. The Soviets were unalterably opposed to a revitalization of the economy because such recovery would render the German and western European populations less vulnerable to the expansion of communism, which fed vigorously on poverty. The Soviets opposed cooperation on any of the four-power coordinating committees, and shut down access to Berlin in the early summer of 1948. The U.S. Air Force reallocated transport aircraft to Europe and recalled reserve officers and airmen with scarce personnel skills, and built an unequaled task force, while the world looked on-- in disbelief. In a twelve-month period the Berlin Airlift fed people and maintained industry, while averting an armed confrontation.

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