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Bertram, or, The castle of St. Aldobrand

Author: Charles Robert Maturin
Publisher: Oxford [England] ; New York : Woodstock Books ; Rutherford, N.J. : Distributed in USA by Publishers Distribution Center, 1992.
Series: Revolution and romanticism, 1789-1834.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The author of Melmoth the wanderer (1820) was an Anglican curate in Dublin struggling to maintain his family when Bertram, with the support of Scott and Byron, was produced at Drury Lane. It is a play of violent and excessive emotions. Kean played the title role, one of those villain-heroes descended from Schiller's Moor, and made the part his own. There were opportunities for elaborate stage effects, notably the  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Maturin, Charles Robert, 1780-1824.
Bertram, or, The castle of St. Aldobrand.
Oxford [England] ; New York : Woodstock Books ; Rutherford, N.J. : Distributed in USA by Publishers Distribution Center, 1992
(OCoLC)645853770
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Charles Robert Maturin
ISBN: 1854771205 9781854771209
OCLC Number: 26855232
Notes: Originally published 1816.
Description: 94 pages ; 21 cm.
Series Title: Revolution and romanticism, 1789-1834.
Other Titles: Bertram
Castle of St. Aldobrand
Responsibility: Charles Maturin.

Abstract:

"The author of Melmoth the wanderer (1820) was an Anglican curate in Dublin struggling to maintain his family when Bertram, with the support of Scott and Byron, was produced at Drury Lane. It is a play of violent and excessive emotions. Kean played the title role, one of those villain-heroes descended from Schiller's Moor, and made the part his own. There were opportunities for elaborate stage effects, notably the storm in the first act. The audience was in the mood for Gothic melodrama, and the production was a resounding success, making for its author about 1,000. Coleridge (whose Remorse three years earlier earned 400) wrote a destructive critique of the play: though audiences of today's Theatre of Cruelty, used to drama dealing in emotional states rather than character and narrative, are unlikely to find his criticisms as devastating as Maturin did at the time. And the language, mocked by Coleridge, in its quieter passages has a steady power."--Jacket.

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