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Bewilderment : new poems and translations

Author: David Ferry
Publisher: Chicago ; London : The University of Chicago Press, [2012]
Series: Phoenix poets.
Edition/Format:   Book : Poetry : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"To read David Ferry's Bewilderment is to be reminded that poetry of the highest order can be made by the subtlest of means. The passionate nature and originality of Ferry's prosodic daring works astonishing transformations that take your breath away. In poem after poem, his diction modulates beautifully between plainspoken high eloquence and colloquial vigor, making his distinctive speech one of the most  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Ferry
ISBN: 9780226244884 0226244881
OCLC Number: 768607305
Description: xii, 113 pages ; 23 cm.
Contents: Acknowledgements --
ONE/ Narcissus --
Found Single-Line Poems --
One Two Three Four Five --
Soul --
Untitled --
The Intentions --
Your Personal God (From Horace, Epistles 11.2) --
TWO/ Dedication to His Book (Catullus I) --
Brunswick, Maine, Early Winter, 2000 --
Martial 1.101 --
Measure 100 --
Ancestral Lines --
Entreaty --
October --
Spring (From Virgil, Georgics II) --
Anguilla (Eugenio Montale, "L'Anguilla") --
In the Reading Room --
THREE/ Coffee Lips --
Incubus --
At the Street Corner (Rilke, "Das Lied des Zwerges") --
The Late-Hour Poem --
At a Bar --
To Varus (Horace, Odes 1.18) --
Somebody in a Bar --
In Despair (Cavafy, "En Apognosi") --
Dido in Despair (From Virgil, Aeneid IV) --
Catullus II --
Virgil, Aeneid II --
Thermopylae (Cavafy, "Thermopylae") --
FOUR/ Street Scene --
Willoughby Spit --
Everybody's Tree --
FIVE/ The Offering of Isaac (From Genesis A, Anglo-Saxon) --
SIX/ Reading Arthur Gold's Poem "Chest Cancer" --
Reading Arthur Gold's "Trolley Poem" --
Reading Arthur Gold's Poem "On the Beach at Asbury" --
Reading Arthur Gold's Poem "Rome, December 1973" --
Virgil, Aeneid VI --
Reading Arthur Gold's Prose Poem "Allegory" --
Looking, Where Is the Mailbox? --
SEVEN/ Orpheus and Eurydice (From Virgil, Georgics IV) --
Lake Water --
The White Skunk --
Virgil, Aenid VI --
That Now Are Wild and Do Not Remember --
Untitled Dream Poem --
EIGHT/ The Departure from Fallen Troy (From Virgil, Aeneid II) --
to where --
Resemblance --
Scrim --
Poem --
The Birds --
Notes.
Series Title: Phoenix poets.
Responsibility: David Ferry.

Abstract:

"To read David Ferry's Bewilderment is to be reminded that poetry of the highest order can be made by the subtlest of means. The passionate nature and originality of Ferry's prosodic daring works astonishing transformations that take your breath away. In poem after poem, his diction modulates beautifully between plainspoken high eloquence and colloquial vigor, making his distinctive speech one of the most interesting and ravishing achievements of the past half century. Ferry has fully realized both the potential for vocal expressiveness in his phrasing and the way his phrasing plays against--and with--his genius for metrical variation. His vocal phrasing thus becomes an amazingly flexible instrument of psychological and spiritual inquiry. Most poets write inside a very narrow range of experience and feeling, whether in free or metered verse. But Ferry's use of meter tends to enhance the colloquial nature of his writing, while giving him access to an immense variety of feeling. Sometimes that feeling is so powerful it's like witnessing a volcanologist taking measurements in the midst of an eruption. Ferry's translations, meanwhile, are amazingly acclimated English poems. Once his voice takes hold of them they are as bred in the bone as all his other work. And the translations in this book are vitally related to the original poems around them"--Provided by publisher.

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