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The Bible and spiritual criticism; being the second series of the Exeter Hall lectures on the Bible delivered in London, England, in the months of February, March and April, 1904,

Author: Arthur T Pierson
Publisher: New York, Baker & Taylor Co. [1905]
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Arthur T Pierson
OCLC Number: 1205028
Description: xxiii, 276 pages 19 cm
Contents: Chapter I. Spiritual faculties --
Right and wrong methods of Bible Study --
Ignorance the mother of superstition --
The Bible Declares itself the product of inspiration --
Conditions of a reverent criticism --
Encouragements to reverent study --
The Inspirer of the Word becoming the interpreter of it --
Chapter II. Spiritual methods --
I. Basis of all: firm conviction that God is the author of the book. --
2. If God is the author, there is but one speaker, however many human media --
3. We may expect the first mention of any subject to forecast the after treatment of it. --
4. We may expect a full mention of every leading subject vitally connected with holy living --
Instances of full mention or exhaustive treatment --
Chapter III. Spiritual organism --
Parallel mention for (1) comparison (2) contrast (3) Completeness --
Examples (1) Comparison: Ephesians 5:19, Colossians 3:16. Filled with the Spirit, and with the Word; results the same in individual and church life --
Parables of talents and pounds. Note differences and resemblances --
Old Testament and New Testament units of measure of God's power in believer; Micah 7:15, Ephesians 1:19-23 --
in each case, a passing over the blood, a triumph over foes, a miracle of power, a divine leadership, etc. --
(2) Contrast --
Satan as adversary; Christ as advocate --
Babel or Babylon and New Jerusalem --
(3) Completeness --
Vine: Isaiah 5, Psalm 80, John 15 --
In first, God's disappointment; in second, outward foes to fruitfulness; in last, secret of fertility --
Two paracletes: Holy Spirit in heart, Christ at the throne --
Good works, wicked works, and dead works; the last corresponding to wild fruit --
The Bible as a whole like a perfect organism --
(1) All parts correspond mutually. Augustine said, "Old Testament latent in the New, New latent in the Old" --
(2) All parts mutually necessary. Complete and complement each other, like Leviticus and Hebrews --
(3) nothing superfluous and nothing lacking; impossible to imagine a more perfect book for the purposes for which designed --
Chapter 4. Spiritual structure --
Bible considered as a Building --
Architectural figure --
A perfect structure involves: beauty of conception, unity of plan, harmony of parts, growth towards completion. In all these the Word of God shows perfection. --
I. Bible embodies a divine idea --
Compare different orders of architecture --
The one dominant idea of the Bible: God saving man. Ephesians 1:10 --
II. Hence unity of plan --
form includes and excludes --
I. Includes "seven pillars": Man's creation and fall --
Prophecy to inspire hope --
Sacrifice to train faith --
Gospels to present Redeemer --
Pentecost to make truth effectual --
Church to test and prove grace --
Apocalypse to reveal final goal. Here are all factors supplied; and in their necessary order --
2. Excludes all that is not germane to redemption; mere scientific information, secular history, rhetorical effect --
The plan of the Bible explains what is and is not there --
III. Harmony of parts. "Fifty-framed together" --
I. Subordination of all these to main idea and purpose --
Some truths very prominent like pillars: Jachin and Boaz --
Such as God's righteousness and love --
some others like "towers": divine attributes --
Others like a central window. Isaiah 53. Middle chapter of the last 27 or transfiguration as an event, or tabernacle as an object lesson, or Pentecost as an experience --
2. Solidarity. All parts connected, cemented in one --
Rev. John Urquhart: "how to read the Bible." --
chapter on unity of Genesis. Phrase 'In Christ' connects to whole New Testament. Phrase 'Ye in Me and I in You' explains whole relation of believer to Christ, standing and state. Many lesser unties embraced in the greater: compare arches in a building, each with keystone. Certain words are keys to a whole book: "Righteousness" to Romans: "Separate" to Corinthians: "Walk" to Galatians; "Heavenlies" to Ephesians. Life, light, love. Three revelations of God, as sum of all being, of all intellectual truth, and of all moral beauty --
Hence indestructible. Luther's text, Psa. 119:89 --
Word of God essentially based in Heaven, and rises far beyond reach of human assault --
Satan may destroy men's Faith in it but cannot touch its true Life Chapter V. Spiritual progress --
In a building, part is added to part in orderly progress. B.W. Newton, on "Structural Method" of study: note first and last mention, and trace what lies between on same subject --
1. First and last mention often indicate what is between --
2. Intermediate matter is found fitly joined together --
3. There is order and progress, regular consecutive additions, etc. --
4. This is true, although canonical order is not order of production --
The form of a pyramid best illustrates Bible structure --
The capstone is itself a little pyramid; there can be but one headstone, and all the courses between cornerstone and capstone must be in line with both, etc. --
"Progress in doctrine" may be illustrated --
I. Single verses. Galatians 5:22,23. Here are nine graces --
first appear to look Godward, the next three manward, and the last three selfward --
Titus 2:11-13. Here are the three forms of salvation --
The instantaneous, progressive, and final. Also whole of New Testament suggested --
"Grace of God," etc., Gospel and Acts. "Teaching us," etc., Epistles. "Looking for that blessed hope," Revelation --
II. Paragraphs. 2 Peter 1:5-8. "Faith and virtue, etc." Here the growth is regular: faith --
the childhood; virtue --
Christian manhood, manly knowledge, self-control in pleasure and pain, maturity of Godliness, and then influence in the spheres of church and world. Re.22:3,5. From entire banishment of sin to the glorious reign of saints, seven successive stages --
III. Chapters, etc. Matthew 6-7. Character and influence; conduct and motive; destiny. John15:1-27. Four antidotes to trouble --
Faith in God --
in Christ --
In immortality, and in the indwelling Spirit --
John 7. Separation from world, sanctification by truth, unity, glory. Each of these prepares for what follows --
Rev. 2-3 Rewards to the seven churches --
These follow historic order from Eden to Solomon's reign --
IV. Whole book. John 1:4; 20:31. Development of idea, eternal life --
Acts 1:8. Progress from Judea to Samaria, Rome, Greece --
V. Groups of books. Examine progressive order of Christ's miracles, particularly three of raising the dead. Christ's teaching as to prayer, from Matt. 6:6, to John 16:24-26. There are ten progressive lessons. Typical events in the Life of Christ follow exact order of epistles from Romans to Thessalonians: --
Death, burial, and resurrection --
Inbreathing of Spirit --
Forty Days' walk in the Spirit --
Ascension --
Compensating joy --
Session at right hand of God, and second coming; and yet the last of these epistles were the first written. It seems that He who inspired the Word, ordered the historic arrangement of the Canon, controlling by His providence the formation of the Bible as we have it --
Chapter VI. Spiritual progress continued --
1 Kings 6:7. All parts fit to structure, each in place and in its order --
I. Old Testament --
Three main divisions. Historical books, 17; Poetical, 5; Prophetical, 17. First and last sub-divided into 5 major and 12 minor books, in each case --
The progress is obvious: Genesis, the beginning of man and of sin; Exodus, the separation to God; Leviticus, service and fellowship; Numbers, organization, and pilgrimage; Deuteronomy, rehearsal of the law; Joshua, entrance and occupation; Judges, decline and failure; then the six books of the monarchy displacing theocracy, and ending in division and captivity; then three books about the Captives and the return, the last exhibiting providence of God in National history, and preparing for Job, first of the poetical group, which shows Providence in individual history. Then Psalms --
The believer speaking to God; then three books showing consecutively the World's verdict (the outcome of its highest wisdom); the world's vanity, to him who seeks in it satisfaction; and the world's enmity, alluring the believer to forsake the Lord --
Then come the seventeen Prophetical books; the five major prophecies and the twelve minor. Isaiah begins with Messiah as Servant of Jehovah and Suffering Saviour of man; and Daniel ends this group, with Christ as sovereign of the world and victor over all foes --
There is a curious parallel between the Old and New Testament history. In the New, there is a New beginning in the Second Man; a new separation --
The Ecclesia, or Church; a new service and fellowship, organization and pilgrimage; a New Law of Self-sacrifice and dispersion; then a New Occupation of the world begun for Christ; a decline and failure, a worldly kingdom under Constantine, ending in division and dark ages of captivity, then a new Restoration (Reformation), etc. The coincidence is most striking --
II. New Testament shows similar progress: Matthew deals with the Messiah King, and addresses the Hebrew; Mark with the mighty worker, and addresses particularly the Roman; Luke with the Perfect Man and addresses the Greek; and John fulfils a special mission after declension had begun, and presents the perfect Deity of Christ, In Acts, Christ by the Spirit continues to do and teach; and in the Epistles, what He first taught in the germ, is expanded into fullness, and what He could not say because disciples could not bear it, was by the Spirit taught by epistle writers, when by His illumination they could bear it. Revelation is the manifest keystone not only to the new Testament but to the whole of the Word of God. We have followed the perimeter of a golden ring, and come back in Revelation to what was begun with in Genesis Chapter VII. Spiritual Progress continued --
Progress of doctrine as seen in the entire Bible --
Marked feature in the New Testament. Positions of Writings of John. Up to about 65 A.D. the Church preserves primitive order. In one year there was a rapid decline. After about year 70 no new inspired addition until after twenty-five years, then John's Gospel and Revelation. John's writings intended to meet the period of declension. Hence what he omits and emphasizes. III. As to the whole Bible --
Note marked instances of Progressive teaching: 1. Rewards.- Emphasis in Old Testament on temporal good; in New on eternal. Prosperity the blessing of Old, adversity of New. 2. Law --
In Old preparing for and introducing Dispensation of Grace --
3. Dispensations --
Seven definite period of divine dealing with the race. Each has seven successive features: New Revelation, Declension, Union of Godly and worldly, Worldly civilization, Parallel growth of good and evil, apostasy, judgment --
4. Legislation --
Covenant, including family and state, based on sacrifice, ratified in worship, involving consecration of time, tithes, first-born, and self --
5. Sabbatic law --
In Eden; then rest from toil, Festal rest in Sabbatic system, embracing seventh day, week, month, year, seventh seven of years, &c. Then a transition Sabbath (Isaiah lviii.) of rest from self-absorption; then in New Testament rest in worship, in resurrection power, and Holy Spirit peace (Heb. Iii., 7- iv , 23) --
7. Temple of God --
First, the universe; then the tabernacle built by Moses, &c.; then the believer; and finally the new city of God. --
8. Satan --
As a liar, accuser (Job) , Hinderer (Zech. Iii., I), Tempter (Matt. iv.) , Sifter (Luke xxii.), Seducer (Acts v.), Adversary (Rev. xx.). Compare Eph. Vi., 10-17. The full armor, each piece fitted to meet Him in these successive characters --
9. Christ as second man, Last Adam --
Compare Gen. iii., 15; 2 Sam. Vii., Psa. viii., Isa. Viii, Isa. Liii, Rom. V., I Cor. Xv, Ephes. V., and Coloss. Iii., Heb. Ii., Rev. xxi., xxii. Steady progress, the seed of the woman, monarch of man, Lord of creation, Spiritual Father , Saviour of those who die without voluntary sin, like infants: giver of Resurrection and so Lord of Death and the Devil --
10. Lamb of God --
This is one of the grand lines of truth that run through and unite both Testaments. Again there are ten marked steps of progress, every new one distinctly marking an advance (Gen. iv. 4, xxii.; Exod. Xii.; Lev. Xvi.; Isa. Liii.; John i., 29-33; Acts viii; I Pet. i., 18-21; Rev. v., xxi., xxii.). Following this development, we see first the simple idea of a Lamb offered and accepted; then a God-provided Lam; a slain Lamb and sprinkled blood: two Lambs expressing death and life; the vicarious suffering Lamb; then John declares Christ to be the Lamb of God; Philip identifies him with Isaiah's prophecy; Peter first refers to His resurrection; and in Revelation we have the final disclosure of the Lion-Lamb, who makes Kings and Priests, and is the centre of Heaven's life, light , worship and service. --
Chapter VIII. Spiritual symmetry --
A master mathematician and geometer behind this book: a system of exact arithmetic numbers and geometric forms --
God in His work of nature. --
Mathematical proportion everywhere. --
Planetary worlds- crystallization, exact symmetric forms and angles --
Vegetable world --
System of numbers so accurate as to be basis of classification by Linnaeus. Spiral arrangement of leaf-buds, etc. --
Animal world --
Mollusca, radiate, vertebrata, etc. Muscular, vascular, and nervous system. Geometry: hexagonal cell and lenses in eye of the dragon fly, web of spider, etc. --
Color and sound --
Solar spectrum and musical octave. All these marks of a mind that counts, weighs, measures and proportions, analyzes and combines with absolute exactness. Nature a vast clockwork. Paley. --
God in His word --
The same mathematician. Four leading numbers and forms, with their combinations, 1, 2, 3, 4,: 3 + 4= 7, 3*4= 12. Other numbers also show a purpose: 10, 40, 70, 144, 490, 1,000, etc. --
Curious fact --
where seven occurs, usually meant to be sum of four and three, the distinction being marked by some different features, as in Lord's prayer, seven petitions- Four pertaining to God and three to man. See seven parables of Kingdom (Matt.xiii) and seven epistles (Rev. ii., iii.), in both which cases three are different from the other four --
Also twelve is meant to be multiple of four and three. Compare watches of the night, four of three hours each; breast-plate, four rows of three each (Exod. Xxvii., 16,17); and Tribal standards about Tabernacle (Num. ii) --
There is undoubted moral meaning in this numerical system (Compare Numbers xv. 34, Leviticus xxvi. 34, 35, &c.). 490 years form Saul to captivity, with 70 Sabbatic years, for neglect of which God exacted 70 years of captivity. Another 490 years also followed from captivity to Christ, then 70 years from His birth to fall of Jerusalem, showing how numbers pervade history also --
Chapter IX. Spiritual types --
I. Its starting point --
II. Its basis: vicarious sacrifice --
III. Its privilege --
IV. Its progress --
V. Its perils --
VI. Its duties --
VII. Its present rest --
VIII. Its final consummation --
Chapter X. Spiritual wisdom --
The universe --
Chapter XI. Spiritual verdicts --
I. Creation --
II. Sin --
III. Judgment --
IV. Two spheres --
V. Salvation --
VI. Prayer --
Verdicts in favor of Bible --
Conclusions --
Chapter XII. Spiritual verities --
1. I believe there is a God --
2. I believe the Bible is God's book --
3. I believe Jesus Christ is the Son of God and savior of men --
4. I believe the supernatural working of God --
5. I believe in the Holy Spirit of God --
6. I believe the Christian faith --
Final words --
Search the Scriptures --
Pray in secret --
Read story of missions --
Trust experiment --
Have no fear for the Bible --
Live unto God.
Responsibility: by Arthur T. Pierson.

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schema:description"Chapter VII. Spiritual Progress continued -- Progress of doctrine as seen in the entire Bible -- Marked feature in the New Testament. Positions of Writings of John. Up to about 65 A.D. the Church preserves primitive order. In one year there was a rapid decline. After about year 70 no new inspired addition until after twenty-five years, then John's Gospel and Revelation. John's writings intended to meet the period of declension. Hence what he omits and emphasizes. III. As to the whole Bible -- Note marked instances of Progressive teaching: 1. Rewards.- Emphasis in Old Testament on temporal good; in New on eternal. Prosperity the blessing of Old, adversity of New. 2. Law -- In Old preparing for and introducing Dispensation of Grace -- 3. Dispensations -- Seven definite period of divine dealing with the race. Each has seven successive features: New Revelation, Declension, Union of Godly and worldly, Worldly civilization, Parallel growth of good and evil, apostasy, judgment -- 4. Legislation -- Covenant, including family and state, based on sacrifice, ratified in worship, involving consecration of time, tithes, first-born, and self -- 5. Sabbatic law -- In Eden; then rest from toil, Festal rest in Sabbatic system, embracing seventh day, week, month, year, seventh seven of years, &c. Then a transition Sabbath (Isaiah lviii.) of rest from self-absorption; then in New Testament rest in worship, in resurrection power, and Holy Spirit peace (Heb. Iii., 7- iv , 23) -- 7. Temple of God -- First, the universe; then the tabernacle built by Moses, &c.; then the believer; and finally the new city of God. -- 8. Satan -- As a liar, accuser (Job) , Hinderer (Zech. Iii., I), Tempter (Matt. iv.) , Sifter (Luke xxii.), Seducer (Acts v.), Adversary (Rev. xx.). Compare Eph. Vi., 10-17. The full armor, each piece fitted to meet Him in these successive characters -- 9. Christ as second man, Last Adam -- Compare Gen. iii., 15; 2 Sam. Vii., Psa. viii., Isa. Viii, Isa. Liii, Rom. V., I Cor. Xv, Ephes. V., and Coloss. Iii., Heb. Ii., Rev. xxi., xxii. Steady progress, the seed of the woman, monarch of man, Lord of creation, Spiritual Father , Saviour of those who die without voluntary sin, like infants: giver of Resurrection and so Lord of Death and the Devil -- 10. Lamb of God -- This is one of the grand lines of truth that run through and unite both Testaments. Again there are ten marked steps of progress, every new one distinctly marking an advance (Gen. iv. 4, xxii.; Exod. Xii.; Lev. Xvi.; Isa. Liii.; John i., 29-33; Acts viii; I Pet. i., 18-21; Rev. v., xxi., xxii.). Following this development, we see first the simple idea of a Lamb offered and accepted; then a God-provided Lam; a slain Lamb and sprinkled blood: two Lambs expressing death and life; the vicarious suffering Lamb; then John declares Christ to be the Lamb of God; Philip identifies him with Isaiah's prophecy; Peter first refers to His resurrection; and in Revelation we have the final disclosure of the Lion-Lamb, who makes Kings and Priests, and is the centre of Heaven's life, light , worship and service. -- Chapter VIII. Spiritual symmetry -- A master mathematician and geometer behind this book: a system of exact arithmetic numbers and geometric forms -- God in His work of nature. -- Mathematical proportion everywhere. -- Planetary worlds- crystallization, exact symmetric forms and angles -- Vegetable world -- System of numbers so accurate as to be basis of classification by Linnaeus. Spiral arrangement of leaf-buds, etc. -- Animal world -- Mollusca, radiate, vertebrata, etc. Muscular, vascular, and nervous system. Geometry: hexagonal cell and lenses in eye of the dragon fly, web of spider, etc. -- Color and sound -- Solar spectrum and musical octave. All these marks of a mind that counts, weighs, measures and proportions, analyzes and combines with absolute exactness. Nature a vast clockwork. Paley. -- God in His word -- The same mathematician. Four leading numbers and forms, with their combinations, 1, 2, 3, 4,: 3 + 4= 7, 3*4= 12. Other numbers also show a purpose: 10, 40, 70, 144, 490, 1,000, etc. -- Curious fact -- where seven occurs, usually meant to be sum of four and three, the distinction being marked by some different features, as in Lord's prayer, seven petitions- Four pertaining to God and three to man. See seven parables of Kingdom (Matt.xiii) and seven epistles (Rev. ii., iii.), in both which cases three are different from the other four -- Also twelve is meant to be multiple of four and three. Compare watches of the night, four of three hours each; breast-plate, four rows of three each (Exod. Xxvii., 16,17); and Tribal standards about Tabernacle (Num. ii) -- There is undoubted moral meaning in this numerical system (Compare Numbers xv. 34, Leviticus xxvi. 34, 35, &c.). 490 years form Saul to captivity, with 70 Sabbatic years, for neglect of which God exacted 70 years of captivity. Another 490 years also followed from captivity to Christ, then 70 years from His birth to fall of Jerusalem, showing how numbers pervade history also -- Chapter IX. Spiritual types -- I. Its starting point -- II. Its basis: vicarious sacrifice -- III. Its privilege -- IV. Its progress -- V. Its perils -- VI. Its duties -- VII. Its present rest -- VIII. Its final consummation -- Chapter X. Spiritual wisdom -- The universe -- Chapter XI. Spiritual verdicts -- I. Creation -- II. Sin -- III. Judgment -- IV. Two spheres -- V. Salvation -- VI. Prayer -- Verdicts in favor of Bible -- Conclusions -- Chapter XII. Spiritual verities -- 1. I believe there is a God -- 2. I believe the Bible is God's book -- 3. I believe Jesus Christ is the Son of God and savior of men -- 4. I believe the supernatural working of God -- 5. I believe in the Holy Spirit of God -- 6. I believe the Christian faith -- Final words -- Search the Scriptures -- Pray in secret -- Read story of missions -- Trust experiment -- Have no fear for the Bible -- Live unto God."@en
schema:description"Chapter V. Spiritual progress -- In a building, part is added to part in orderly progress. B.W. Newton, on "Structural Method" of study: note first and last mention, and trace what lies between on same subject -- 1. First and last mention often indicate what is between -- 2. Intermediate matter is found fitly joined together -- 3. There is order and progress, regular consecutive additions, etc. -- 4. This is true, although canonical order is not order of production -- The form of a pyramid best illustrates Bible structure -- The capstone is itself a little pyramid; there can be but one headstone, and all the courses between cornerstone and capstone must be in line with both, etc. -- "Progress in doctrine" may be illustrated -- I. Single verses. Galatians 5:22,23. Here are nine graces -- first appear to look Godward, the next three manward, and the last three selfward -- Titus 2:11-13. Here are the three forms of salvation -- The instantaneous, progressive, and final. Also whole of New Testament suggested -- "Grace of God," etc., Gospel and Acts. "Teaching us," etc., Epistles. "Looking for that blessed hope," Revelation -- II. Paragraphs. 2 Peter 1:5-8. "Faith and virtue, etc." Here the growth is regular: faith -- the childhood; virtue -- Christian manhood, manly knowledge, self-control in pleasure and pain, maturity of Godliness, and then influence in the spheres of church and world. Re.22:3,5. From entire banishment of sin to the glorious reign of saints, seven successive stages -- III. Chapters, etc. Matthew 6-7. Character and influence; conduct and motive; destiny. John15:1-27. Four antidotes to trouble -- Faith in God -- in Christ -- In immortality, and in the indwelling Spirit -- John 7. Separation from world, sanctification by truth, unity, glory. Each of these prepares for what follows -- Rev. 2-3 Rewards to the seven churches -- These follow historic order from Eden to Solomon's reign -- IV. Whole book. John 1:4; 20:31. Development of idea, eternal life -- Acts 1:8. Progress from Judea to Samaria, Rome, Greece -- V. Groups of books. Examine progressive order of Christ's miracles, particularly three of raising the dead. Christ's teaching as to prayer, from Matt. 6:6, to John 16:24-26. There are ten progressive lessons. Typical events in the Life of Christ follow exact order of epistles from Romans to Thessalonians: -- Death, burial, and resurrection -- Inbreathing of Spirit -- Forty Days' walk in the Spirit -- Ascension -- Compensating joy -- Session at right hand of God, and second coming; and yet the last of these epistles were the first written. It seems that He who inspired the Word, ordered the historic arrangement of the Canon, controlling by His providence the formation of the Bible as we have it -- Chapter VI. Spiritual progress continued -- 1 Kings 6:7. All parts fit to structure, each in place and in its order -- I. Old Testament -- Three main divisions. Historical books, 17; Poetical, 5; Prophetical, 17. First and last sub-divided into 5 major and 12 minor books, in each case -- The progress is obvious: Genesis, the beginning of man and of sin; Exodus, the separation to God; Leviticus, service and fellowship; Numbers, organization, and pilgrimage; Deuteronomy, rehearsal of the law; Joshua, entrance and occupation; Judges, decline and failure; then the six books of the monarchy displacing theocracy, and ending in division and captivity; then three books about the Captives and the return, the last exhibiting providence of God in National history, and preparing for Job, first of the poetical group, which shows Providence in individual history. Then Psalms -- The believer speaking to God; then three books showing consecutively the World's verdict (the outcome of its highest wisdom); the world's vanity, to him who seeks in it satisfaction; and the world's enmity, alluring the believer to forsake the Lord -- Then come the seventeen Prophetical books; the five major prophecies and the twelve minor. Isaiah begins with Messiah as Servant of Jehovah and Suffering Saviour of man; and Daniel ends this group, with Christ as sovereign of the world and victor over all foes -- There is a curious parallel between the Old and New Testament history. In the New, there is a New beginning in the Second Man; a new separation -- The Ecclesia, or Church; a new service and fellowship, organization and pilgrimage; a New Law of Self-sacrifice and dispersion; then a New Occupation of the world begun for Christ; a decline and failure, a worldly kingdom under Constantine, ending in division and dark ages of captivity, then a new Restoration (Reformation), etc. The coincidence is most striking -- II. New Testament shows similar progress: Matthew deals with the Messiah King, and addresses the Hebrew; Mark with the mighty worker, and addresses particularly the Roman; Luke with the Perfect Man and addresses the Greek; and John fulfils a special mission after declension had begun, and presents the perfect Deity of Christ, In Acts, Christ by the Spirit continues to do and teach; and in the Epistles, what He first taught in the germ, is expanded into fullness, and what He could not say because disciples could not bear it, was by the Spirit taught by epistle writers, when by His illumination they could bear it. Revelation is the manifest keystone not only to the new Testament but to the whole of the Word of God. We have followed the perimeter of a golden ring, and come back in Revelation to what was begun with in Genesis"@en
schema:description"Chapter I. Spiritual faculties -- Right and wrong methods of Bible Study -- Ignorance the mother of superstition -- The Bible Declares itself the product of inspiration -- Conditions of a reverent criticism -- Encouragements to reverent study -- The Inspirer of the Word becoming the interpreter of it -- Chapter II. Spiritual methods -- I. Basis of all: firm conviction that God is the author of the book. -- 2. If God is the author, there is but one speaker, however many human media -- 3. We may expect the first mention of any subject to forecast the after treatment of it. -- 4. We may expect a full mention of every leading subject vitally connected with holy living -- Instances of full mention or exhaustive treatment -- Chapter III. Spiritual organism -- Parallel mention for (1) comparison (2) contrast (3) Completeness -- Examples (1) Comparison: Ephesians 5:19, Colossians 3:16. Filled with the Spirit, and with the Word; results the same in individual and church life -- Parables of talents and pounds. Note differences and resemblances -- Old Testament and New Testament units of measure of God's power in believer; Micah 7:15, Ephesians 1:19-23 -- in each case, a passing over the blood, a triumph over foes, a miracle of power, a divine leadership, etc. -- (2) Contrast -- Satan as adversary; Christ as advocate -- Babel or Babylon and New Jerusalem -- (3) Completeness -- Vine: Isaiah 5, Psalm 80, John 15 -- In first, God's disappointment; in second, outward foes to fruitfulness; in last, secret of fertility -- Two paracletes: Holy Spirit in heart, Christ at the throne -- Good works, wicked works, and dead works; the last corresponding to wild fruit -- The Bible as a whole like a perfect organism -- (1) All parts correspond mutually. Augustine said, "Old Testament latent in the New, New latent in the Old" -- (2) All parts mutually necessary. Complete and complement each other, like Leviticus and Hebrews -- (3) nothing superfluous and nothing lacking; impossible to imagine a more perfect book for the purposes for which designed -- Chapter 4. Spiritual structure -- Bible considered as a Building -- Architectural figure -- A perfect structure involves: beauty of conception, unity of plan, harmony of parts, growth towards completion. In all these the Word of God shows perfection. -- I. Bible embodies a divine idea -- Compare different orders of architecture -- The one dominant idea of the Bible: God saving man. Ephesians 1:10 -- II. Hence unity of plan -- form includes and excludes -- I. Includes "seven pillars": Man's creation and fall -- Prophecy to inspire hope -- Sacrifice to train faith -- Gospels to present Redeemer -- Pentecost to make truth effectual -- Church to test and prove grace -- Apocalypse to reveal final goal. Here are all factors supplied; and in their necessary order -- 2. Excludes all that is not germane to redemption; mere scientific information, secular history, rhetorical effect -- The plan of the Bible explains what is and is not there -- III. Harmony of parts. "Fifty-framed together" -- I. Subordination of all these to main idea and purpose -- Some truths very prominent like pillars: Jachin and Boaz -- Such as God's righteousness and love -- some others like "towers": divine attributes -- Others like a central window. Isaiah 53. Middle chapter of the last 27 or transfiguration as an event, or tabernacle as an object lesson, or Pentecost as an experience -- 2. Solidarity. All parts connected, cemented in one -- Rev. John Urquhart: "how to read the Bible." -- chapter on unity of Genesis. Phrase 'In Christ' connects to whole New Testament. Phrase 'Ye in Me and I in You' explains whole relation of believer to Christ, standing and state. Many lesser unties embraced in the greater: compare arches in a building, each with keystone. Certain words are keys to a whole book: "Righteousness" to Romans: "Separate" to Corinthians: "Walk" to Galatians; "Heavenlies" to Ephesians. Life, light, love. Three revelations of God, as sum of all being, of all intellectual truth, and of all moral beauty -- Hence indestructible. Luther's text, Psa. 119:89 -- Word of God essentially based in Heaven, and rises far beyond reach of human assault -- Satan may destroy men's Faith in it but cannot touch its true Life"@en
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schema:name"The Bible and spiritual criticism; being the second series of the Exeter Hall lectures on the Bible delivered in London, England, in the months of February, March and April, 1904,"@en
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