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Big screen Rome

Author: Monica Silveira Cyrino
Publisher: Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2005.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Big Screen Rome is the first systematic survey of the most important and popular films from the past half century that reconstruct the image of Roman antiquity. The book provides in-depth discussions of a broad selection of famous films, including: William Wyler 's Ben-Hur, Mervyn LeRoy 's Quo Vadis, Stanley Kubrick 's Spartacus, Ridley Scott 's Gladiator, Terry Jones 's Monty Python 's Life of Brian and Richard  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Monica Silveira Cyrino
ISBN: 1405116838 1405116846 9781405116831 9781405116848
OCLC Number: 58546469
Description: ix, 274 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Contents: Quo vadis (1951) --
The robe (1953) --
Ben Hur (1959) --
Spartacus (1960) --
Cleopatra (1963) --
A funny thing happened on the way to the forum (1966) --
Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979) --
History of the world, part I: the Roman Empire sequence (1981) --
Gladiator (2000).
Responsibility: Monica Silveira Cyrino.
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Abstract:

Big Screen Rome is the first systematic survey of the most important and popular films from the past half century that reconstruct the image of Roman antiquity. The book provides in-depth discussions of a broad selection of famous films, including: William Wyler 's Ben-Hur, Mervyn LeRoy 's Quo Vadis, Stanley Kubrick 's Spartacus, Ridley Scott 's Gladiator, Terry Jones 's Monty Python 's Life of Brian and Richard Lester's A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. Big Screen Rome makes an important contribution to discussions about the ongoing relevance of the classical world, demonstrating how popular appropriations of classical antiquity on film can enrich our understanding of the classical tradition. It also shows how modern film-makers use recreations of ancient history as commentaries on contemporary society. Written in an energetic and engaging style, the book responds to the exciting renewal of popular and scholarly interest in cinema about the ancient Roman world.

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