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The big scrum : how Teddy Roosevelt saved football

Author: John J Miller
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The never-before-fully-told story of how Theodore Roosevelt helped to save the game that would become America's most popular sport. During the late nineteenth century, the game of football was a work in progress that only remotely resembled the sport of today. There was no agreement about many of the basic rules, and it was incredibly violent and extremely dangerous. Numerous young men were badly injured and dozens  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Rules
Named Person: Theodore Roosevelt; Theodore Roosevelt
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John J Miller
ISBN: 9780061744501 0061744506
OCLC Number: 641532495
Description: xi, 258 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: The killing fields --
Creation stories --
Game time --
Camp days --
The capacity to inflict pain --
The virile virtues --
Let them be men first --
Rough riding --
Football is a fight --
The air war.
Responsibility: John J. Miller.

Abstract:

The never-before-fully-told story of how Theodore Roosevelt helped to save the game that would become America's most popular sport. During the late nineteenth century, the game of football was a work in progress that only remotely resembled the sport of today. There was no agreement about many of the basic rules, and it was incredibly violent and extremely dangerous. Numerous young men were badly injured and dozens died in highly publicized incidents, often at America's top prep schools and colleges. Objecting to the sport's brutality, a movement of proto-Progressives tried to abolish the game. President Theodore Roosevelt, a vocal advocate of "the strenuous life" and a proponent of risk, acknowledged football's dangers but admired its potential for building character. In 1905, he summoned the coaches of Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to the White House. The result was the establishment of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, as well as a series of rule changes that ultimately transformed football into the quintessential American game.--From publisher description.
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