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Biology is technology : the promise, peril, and new business of engineering life

Author: Robert H Carlson
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2010.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Technology is a Process and a body of knowledge as much as a collection of artifacts. Biology is no different - and we are just beginning to comprehend the challenges inherent in the next stage of biology as a human technology. It is this critical moment, with its wide-ranging implications, that Robert Carlson considers in Biology Is Technology. He offers a uniquely informed perspective on the endeavors that  Read more...
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Genre/Form: 0 Gesamtdarstellung
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Robert H Carlson
ISBN: 9780674035447 0674035445 9780674060159 0674060156
OCLC Number: 318875567
Description: [vii], 279 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm
Contents: What is biology? --
Building with biological parts --
Learning to fly (or yeast, geese, and 747s) --
The second coming of synthetic biology --
A future history of biological engineering --
The pace of change in biological technologies --
The international genetically engineered machines competition --
Reprogramming cells and building genomes --
The promise and peril of biological technologies --
The sources of innovation and the effects of existing and proposed regulations --
Laying the foundations for a bioeconomy --
Of straitjackets and springboards for innovation --
Open-source biology, or open biology? --
What makes a revolution?
Responsibility: Robert H. Carlson.

Abstract:

Technology is a process and a body of knowledge as much as a collection of artifacts. Biology is no different - and we are just beginning to comprehend the challenges inherent in the next stage of  Read more...

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In this new book, bioengineer Robert H. Carlson forecasts the rise of the cell and the subsequent emergence of biological techniques for making fuels, synthetic DNA that builds new organisms, and Read more...

 
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