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Biomechanics : mechanical properties of living tissues

Author: Y C Fung
Publisher: New York : Springer-Verlag, 1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 2nd edView all editions and formats
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Y C Fung
ISBN: 0387979476 9780387979472 3540979476 9783540979470
OCLC Number: 26767762
Description: xviii, 568 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Chapter 1: Introduction : A sketch of the history and scope of the field --
1.1 What is biomechanics? --
1.2 Historical background --
1.3 What's in a name? --
1.4 Mechanics in physiology --
1.5 What contributions has biomechanics made to health science? --
1.6 Our method of approach --
1.7 Tools of investigation --
1.8 What contributions has biomechanics made to mechanics? --
1.9 On the law of Laplace --
Problems --
References --
Chapter 2: The meaning of the constitutive equation --
2.1 Introduction --
2.2 Stress --
2.3 Strain --
2.4 Strain rate --
2.5 Constitutive equations --
2.6 The nonviscous fluid --
2.7 The Newtonian viscous fluid --
2.8 The Hookean elastic solid --
2.9 The effect of temperature --
2.10 Materials with more complex mechanical behavior --
2.11 Viscoelasticity --
2.12 Response of a viscoelastic body to harmonic excitation --
2.13 Use of viscoelastic models --
2.14 Methods of testing --
2.15 Mathematical development of constitutive equations --
Problems --
References --
Chapter 3: The flow properties of blood --
3.1 Blood rheology : an outline --
3.2 The constitutive equation of blood based on viscometric data and Casson's equation --
3.3 Laminar flow of blood in a tube --
3.4 Speculation on why blood viscosity is the way it is --
3.5 Fluid-mechanical interaction of red blood cells with a solid wall --
3.6 Thrombus formation and dissolution --
3.7 Medical applications of blood rheology --
Problems --
References --
Chapter 4: Mechanics of erythrocytes, leukocytes, and other cells --
4.1 Introduction --
4.2 Human red cell dimensions and shape --
4.3 The extreme-value distribution --
4.4 The deformability of red blood cells (RBC) --
4.5 Theoretical considerations of the elasticity of red cells --
4.6 Cell membrane experiments --
4.7 Elasticity of the red cell deformability on turbulence in blood flow --
4.10 Passive deformation of leukocytes --
4.11 Cell adhesion : multipipets experiments --
4.12 Topics of cell mechanics --
Problems --
References to erythrocytes --
References to leukocytes and other cells Chapter 5: Interaction of red cells with vessel wall, and wall shear with endothelium --
5.1 Introduction --
5.2 Apparent viscosity and relative viscosity --
5.3 Effect of size of the blood vessel on the apparent viscosity of blood : The Fahreaus-Lindqvist effect --
5.4 The distribution of suspened particles in fairly narrow rigid tubes --
5.5 The motion of red cells in tightly fitting tubes --
5.6 Inversion of the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect in very narrow tubes --
5.7 Hematocrit in very narrow tubes --
5.8 Theoretical investigations --
5.9 The vascular endothelium --
5.10 Blood shear load acting on the endothelium --
5.11 Tension field in endothelial cell membranes under the fluid interior hypothesis --
5.12 The shape of endothelial cell nucleus under the fluid interior hypothesis --
5.13 Transmission of the tension in the upper endothelial cell membrane to the basal lamina through the sidewalls --
5.14 The hypothesis of a solid-like cell content --
5.15 The effect of turbulent flow on cell stress --
Problems --
References to blood cells in microcirculation --
References to endothelial cells --
Chapter 6: Bioviscoelastic fluids --
6.1 Introduction --
6.2 Methods of testing and data presentation --
6.3 Protoplasm --
6.4 Mucus from the respiratory tract --
6.5 Saliva --
6.6 Cervical mucus and semen --
6.7 Synovial fluid --
Problems --
References --
Chapter 7 : Bioviscoelastic solids --
7.1 Introduction --
7.2 Some elastic materials 7.3 Collagen --
7.4 Thermodynamics of elastic deformation --
7.5 Behavior of soft tissues under uniaxial loading --
7.6 Quasi-linear viscoelasticity of soft tissues --
7.7 Incremental laws --
7.8 The concept of pseudo-elasticity --
7.9 Biaxial loading experiments on soft tissues --
7.10 Description of three-dimensional stress and strain states --
7.11 Strain-energy function --
7.12 An example : the constitutive equation of skin --
7.13 Generalized viscoelastic relations --
7.14 The complementary energy function : inversion of the stress-strain relationship --
7.15 Constitutive equation derived according to microstructure --
Problems --
References --
Chapter 8: Mechanical properties and active remodeling of blood vessels --
8.1 Introduction --
8.2 Structure and composition of blood vessels --
8.3 Arterial wall as a membrane : behavior under uniaxial loading --
8.4 Arterial wall as a membrane : biaxial loading and torsion experiments --
8.5 Arterial wall as a membrane : dynamic modulus of elasticity from flexural wave propagation measurements --
8.6 Mathematical representation of the Pseudo-elastic stress-strain relationship --
8.7 Blood vessel wall as a three-dimensional body : the zero stress state --
8.8 Blood vessel wall as a three-dimensional body : stress and strain, and mechanical properties of the intima, media, and adventitia layers --
8.9 Arterioles. mean stress-mean diameter relationship --
8.10 Capillary blood vessels --
8.11 Veins --
8.12 Effect of stress on tissue growth --
8.13 Morphological and structural remodeling of blood vessels due to change of blood pressure --
8.14 Remodeling the zero stress state of a blood vessel --
8.15 Remodeling of mechanical properties --
8.16 A unified interpretation of the morphological, structural, zero stress state, and mechanical properties remodeling --
Problems --
References Chapter 9: Skeletal muscle --
9.1 Introduction --
9.2 The functional arrangement of muscles --
9.3 The structure of skeletal muscle --
9.4 The sliding element theory of muscle action --
9.5 Single twitch and wave summation --
9.6 Contraction of skeletal muscle bundles --
9.7 Hill's equation for tetanized muscle --
9.8 Hill's three-element model --
9.9 Hypotheses of cross-bridge theory --
9.10 Evidences in support of the cross-bridge hypotheses --
9.11 Mathematical development of the cross-bridge theory --
9.12 Constitutive equation of the muscle as a three-dimensional continuum --
9.13 Partial activation --
Problems --
References --
Chapter 10: Heart muscle --
10.1 Introduction : the difference between myocardial and skeletal muscle cells --
10.2 Use of the papillary of trabecular muscles as testing specimens --
10.3 Use of the whole ventricle to determine material properties of the heart muscle --
10.4 Properties of unstimulated heart muscle --
10.5 Force, length, velocity of shortening, and calcium concentration relationship for the cardiac muscle --
10.6 The behavior of active myocardium according to Hill's equation and its modification --
10.7 Pinto's method --
10.8 Micromechanical derivation of the constitutive law for the passive myocardium --
10.9 Other topics --
Problems --
References --
Chapter 11: Smooth muscles --
11.1 Types of smooth muscles --
11.2 The contractile machinery --
11.3 Rhythmic contraction of smooth muscle --
11.4 The property of a resting smooth muscle : ureter 11.5 Active contraction of ureteral segments --
11.6 Resting smooth muscle : taenia coli --
11.7 Other smooth muscle organs --
Problems --
References --
Chapter 12: Bone and cartilage --
12.1 Introduction --
12.2 Bone as a living organ --
12.3 Blood circulation in bone --
12.5 Viscoelastic properties of bone --
12.6 Functional adaptation of bone --
12.7 Cartilage --
12.8 Viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage --
12.9 The lubrication quality of articular cartilage surfaces --
12.10 Constitutive equations of cartilage according to a triphasic theory --
12.11 Tendons and ligaments --
Problems --
References.
Other Titles: Biodynamics
Responsibility: Y.C. Fung.
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