passa ai contenuti
The birth of a century : early color photographs of America Anteprima di questo documento
ChiudiAnteprima di questo documento
Stiamo controllando…

The birth of a century : early color photographs of America

Autore: Jim Hughes; William Henry Jackson; Detroit Photographic Co.
Editore: London ; New York : Tauris Parke Books, 1994.
Edizione/Formato:   Libro : EnglishVedi tutte le edizioni e i formati
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
The final decades of the nineteenth century and the birth of the twentieth in America are illustrated as never before in this book of unique color images that actually predate the invention of color photography. The secret process which produced them combines the delicacy of watercolors with the look and feel of modern color photographs. The pictures are largely the work of the legendary William Henry Jackson, the  Per saperne di più…
Voto:

(non ancora votato) 0 con commenti - Diventa il primo.

Soggetti
Altri come questo

 

Trova una copia in biblioteca

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Stiamo ricercando le biblioteche che possiedono questo documento…

Dettagli

Genere/forma: Pictorial works
Informazioni aggiuntive sul formato: Online version:
Hughes, Jim, 1937-
Birth of a century.
London ; New York : Tauris Parke Books, 1994
(OCoLC)654743853
Persona incaricata: William Henry Jackson; William Henry Jackson
Tipo documento: Book
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Jim Hughes; William Henry Jackson; Detroit Photographic Co.
ISBN: 1850436460 9781850436461
Numero OCLC: 30683185
Descrizione: 223 p. : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Contenuti: Fire and brimstone at Yellowstone --
The wild west as scenery --
Rocky Mountain riches --
The promised land in Utah --
The first Americans --
Vistas of the Pacific coast --
The northern light of Canada --
New England memories --
Sightseeing in the Northeast --
New York City life --
Capital art in Washington, D.C. --
Great Lakes cities --
The old South seen anew.
Responsabilità: text by Jim Hughes ; photographs by William Henry Jackson and the Detroit Photographic Company.

Abstract:

The final decades of the nineteenth century and the birth of the twentieth in America are illustrated as never before in this book of unique color images that actually predate the invention of color photography. The secret process which produced them combines the delicacy of watercolors with the look and feel of modern color photographs. The pictures are largely the work of the legendary William Henry Jackson, the pioneer photographer who explored the frontiers of the old American west with huge wet-plate cameras and a portable darktent strapped to the back of his trusty mule. Jackson's name is synonymous with high adventure, and Jim Hughes' richly detailed introduction tells a gripping story. Jackson was born in 1843 in New York, and by the 1860s he was on his first trip west, working as a bullwhacker on a wagon train when the nation's unfinished rail lines would take him no further. Finally, on the edge of the western frontier, he began photographing the wild and often spectacularly beautiful landscape of a wilderness soon to be forced into submission by the advancing railroads. Over the next three decades Jackson became the most celebrated of a small and hardy band of pioneer photographers, creating a striking photographic record of the rapidly changing face of America. When his photographs of Yellowstone were credited with helping to persuade Congress to make the region the first National Park, his place in history was secure. From the Rockies to California, from the Great Lakes to the deep South, from teeming New York City to forested New Hampshire these photographs capture both urban and rural landscapes to provide a unique picture of the social and physical evolution of the United States. The book is arranged as a visual tour of the country, and is written with fascinating insights into America's places and politics at the turn of the century. In 1897 Jackson sold the bulk of his enormous archive of photographs to the Detroit Photographic Company, which he joined as a partner. The firm had recently licensed Photochrom, a secret Swiss process for turning black-and-white photographs into color. Completely distinct from today's four-color reproduction, Photochrom is a continuous-tone color rendition of a black-and-white photograph that uses multiple impressions from lithographic stones. The color produced was astonishingly naturalistic, and it was to this process that Jackson devoted his final years of active photography. Gone now was the mule, as he traveled North America in a specially equipped railroad car in search of images to tell the story of the closing of one epoch and the dawning of another. William Henry Jackson died in 1942 after a lifetime that spanned almost the entire history of photography. In recent years, thousands of never distributed Photochrom prints were discovered in a Montana warehouse. This book offers an ample selection of the finest, all published for the first time.

Commenti

Commenti degli utenti
Recuperando commenti GoodReads…
Stiamo recuperando commenti DOGObooks

Etichette

Diventa il primo.
Conferma questa richiesta

Potresti aver già richiesto questo documento. Seleziona OK se si vuole procedere comunque con questa richiesta.

Dati collegati


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/30683185>
library:oclcnum"30683185"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/30683185>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/11396287>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"1843"
schema:deathDate"1942"
schema:familyName"Jackson"
schema:givenName"William Henry"
schema:name"Jackson, William Henry."
schema:name"Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942."
schema:contributor
<http://viaf.org/viaf/11396287>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"1843"
schema:deathDate"1942"
schema:familyName"Jackson"
schema:givenName"William Henry"
schema:name"Jackson, William Henry."
schema:name"Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942."
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1994"
schema:description"The final decades of the nineteenth century and the birth of the twentieth in America are illustrated as never before in this book of unique color images that actually predate the invention of color photography. The secret process which produced them combines the delicacy of watercolors with the look and feel of modern color photographs. The pictures are largely the work of the legendary William Henry Jackson, the pioneer photographer who explored the frontiers of the old American west with huge wet-plate cameras and a portable darktent strapped to the back of his trusty mule. Jackson's name is synonymous with high adventure, and Jim Hughes' richly detailed introduction tells a gripping story. Jackson was born in 1843 in New York, and by the 1860s he was on his first trip west, working as a bullwhacker on a wagon train when the nation's unfinished rail lines would take him no further. Finally, on the edge of the western frontier, he began photographing the wild and often spectacularly beautiful landscape of a wilderness soon to be forced into submission by the advancing railroads. Over the next three decades Jackson became the most celebrated of a small and hardy band of pioneer photographers, creating a striking photographic record of the rapidly changing face of America. When his photographs of Yellowstone were credited with helping to persuade Congress to make the region the first National Park, his place in history was secure. From the Rockies to California, from the Great Lakes to the deep South, from teeming New York City to forested New Hampshire these photographs capture both urban and rural landscapes to provide a unique picture of the social and physical evolution of the United States. The book is arranged as a visual tour of the country, and is written with fascinating insights into America's places and politics at the turn of the century. In 1897 Jackson sold the bulk of his enormous archive of photographs to the Detroit Photographic Company, which he joined as a partner. The firm had recently licensed Photochrom, a secret Swiss process for turning black-and-white photographs into color. Completely distinct from today's four-color reproduction, Photochrom is a continuous-tone color rendition of a black-and-white photograph that uses multiple impressions from lithographic stones. The color produced was astonishingly naturalistic, and it was to this process that Jackson devoted his final years of active photography. Gone now was the mule, as he traveled North America in a specially equipped railroad car in search of images to tell the story of the closing of one epoch and the dawning of another. William Henry Jackson died in 1942 after a lifetime that spanned almost the entire history of photography. In recent years, thousands of never distributed Photochrom prints were discovered in a Montana warehouse. This book offers an ample selection of the finest, all published for the first time."@en
schema:description"Fire and brimstone at Yellowstone -- The wild west as scenery -- Rocky Mountain riches -- The promised land in Utah -- The first Americans -- Vistas of the Pacific coast -- The northern light of Canada -- New England memories -- Sightseeing in the Northeast -- New York City life -- Capital art in Washington, D.C. -- Great Lakes cities -- The old South seen anew."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/364891654>
schema:genre"Pictorial works"@en
schema:genre"Pictorial works."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The birth of a century : early color photographs of America"@en
schema:numberOfPages"223"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Chiudi finestra

Per favore entra in WorldCat 

Non hai un account? Puoi facilmente crearne uno gratuito.