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Bitterly divided : the South's inner Civil War

Author: David Williams
Publisher: New York : New Press : Distributed by W.W. Norton, 2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From the author of the celebrated A People's History of the Civil War, a new account of the Confederacy's collapse from within. The American Confederacy, historian David Williams reveals, was in fact fighting two civil warsan external one that we hear so much about and an internal one about which there is scant literature and virtually no public awareness. From the Confederacy's very beginnings, Williams shows,  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Williams, David, 1959-
Bitterly divided.
New York : New Press : Distributed by W.W. Norton, 2008
(OCoLC)607777782
Online version:
Williams, David, 1959-
Bitterly divided.
New York : New Press : Distributed by W.W. Norton, 2008
(OCoLC)609302675
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David Williams
ISBN: 9781595581082 1595581081
OCLC Number: 181139995
Description: 310 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Nothing but divisions among our people --
Rich man's war --
Fighting each other harder than we ever fought the enemy --
Yes, we all shall be free --
Now the wolf has come --
Defeated- by the people at home.
Responsibility: David Williams.
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Abstract:

From the author of the celebrated A People's History of the Civil War, a new account of the Confederacy's collapse from within. The American Confederacy, historian David Williams reveals, was in fact fighting two civil warsan external one that we hear so much about and an internal one about which there is scant literature and virtually no public awareness. From the Confederacy's very beginnings, Williams shows, white southerners were as likely to have opposed secession as supported it, and they undermined the Confederate war effort at nearly every turn. The draft law was nearly impossible to enforce, women defied Confederate authorities by staging food riots, and most of the time two-thirds of the Confederate army was absent with or without leave. In just one of many telling examples in this rich and eye-opening narrative history, Williams shows that, if the nearly half-million southerners who served in the Union military had been with the Confederates, the opposing forces would have been evenly matched. Shattering the myth of wartime southern unity, this riveting new analysis takes on the enduring power of the Confederacy's image and reveals it to be, like the Confederacy itself, a hollow shell.

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