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A black and white case : how affirmative action survived its greatest legal challenge

Autor: Greg Stohr
Editora: Princeton : Bloomberg Press, 2004.
Edição/Formato   Livro : Inglês : 1st edVer todas as edições e formatos
Base de Dados:WorldCat
Resumo:
"In the late 1990's, two lawsuits by white applicants who had been rejected by the University of Michigan began working their way through the federal court system, aimed at the abolition of racial preferences in college admissions. The stakes were high, the constitutional questions profound, the politics and emotions explosive. It was soon evident that the matter was headed for the highest court in the land, but  Ler mais...
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Detalhes

Pessoa Denominada: Barbara Grutter; Jennifer Gratz; Lee C Bollinger; Lee C Bollinger; Jennifer Gratz; Barbara Grutter
Tipo de Material: Recurso Internet
Tipo de Documento: Livro, Recurso Internet
Todos os Autores / Contribuintes: Greg Stohr
ISBN: 1576601706 9781576601709
Número OCLC: 55067087
Descrição: xi, 333 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Conteúdos: A tale of two professors --
Getting lawyered up --
Gratz, Grutter, and Hamacher --
Equal protection --
Arguments Michigan wouldn't make --
A clash in chambers --
Accepted on the spot --
Bollinger's new front --
Duggan's distinction --
Preferences on trial --
A court divided --
Martin v. Boggs --
Looking to the high court --
The most powerful woman in America --
Friends of the court --
"She's fabulous" --
"Race unfortunately still matters" --
Hail to the victors.
Responsabilidade: Greg Stohr.
Mais informações:

Resumo:

"In the late 1990's, two lawsuits by white applicants who had been rejected by the University of Michigan began working their way through the federal court system, aimed at the abolition of racial preferences in college admissions. The stakes were high, the constitutional questions profound, the politics and emotions explosive. It was soon evident that the matter was headed for the highest court in the land, but there all clarity ended." "In A Black and White Case, veteran Supreme Court reporter Greg Stohr portrays the individual dramas and exposes the human passions that colored and propelled this momentous legal struggle. His fascinating account takes us deep inside America's court system, where logic collides with emotion, and common sense must contend with the majesty and sometimes the seeming perversity of the law. He follows the trail from Michigan to Washington, D.C., revealing how lawyers argued and strategized, how lower-court judges fought behind the scenes for control of the cases, and why the White House filed a brief in support of the white students." "Finally, Stohr details the fallout from the Supreme Court's controversial 2003 ruling that both upheld affirmative action and upended some of the methods that had been used to effect it. And he shows how colleges and universities are reshaping their affirmative action policies - an evolution closely watched by lower courts, employers, civil rights lawyers, legislators, regulators, and the public."--BOOK JACKET.

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