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Black culture and the New Deal : the quest for civil rights in the Roosevelt era

Author: Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff
Publisher: Chapel Hill, N.C. : University of North Carolina Press, ©2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In the 1930s, the Roosevelt administration--unwilling to antagonize a powerful southern congressional bloc--refused to endorse legislation that openly sought to improve political, economic, and social conditions for African Americans. Instead, as historian Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff shows, the administration recognized and celebrated African Americans by offering federal support to notable black intellectuals,  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff
ISBN: 9780807833124 0807833126 9780807899243 0807899240
OCLC Number: 317929500
Description: [xv], 312 p. : ill., photos ; 25 cm.
Contents: Introduction --
Ambivalent inclusion --
Hooked on classics --
The editor's dilemma --
Constructing G.I. Joe Louis --
Variety for the servicemen --
Projecting unity --
Epilogue.
Responsibility: Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff.

Abstract:

Shows how cultural programs became a form of racial policy. This book illustrates how programs within the Federal Arts Projects and several war agencies gave voice to such notable African Americans  Read more...

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"An accessible study that offers a fresh understanding of race-related programs during the Roosevelt era by showing how "cultural emancipation" complemented economic policies to improve life for all Read more...

 
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schema:description""In the 1930s, the Roosevelt administration--unwilling to antagonize a powerful southern congressional bloc--refused to endorse legislation that openly sought to improve political, economic, and social conditions for African Americans. Instead, as historian Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff shows, the administration recognized and celebrated African Americans by offering federal support to notable black intellectuals, celebrities, and artists. Sklaroff illustrates how programs within the Federal Arts Projects and several war agencies gave voice to such notable African Americans as Lena Horne, Joe Louis, Duke Ellington, and Richard Wright, as well as lesser-known figures. She argues that these New Deal programs represent a key moment in the history of American race relations, as the cultural arena provided black men and women with unique employment opportunities and new outlets for political expression. Equally important, she contends that these cultural programs were not merely an attempt to appease a black constituency but were also part of the New Deal's larger goal of promoting a multiracial nation. Yet, while federal projects ushered in creativity and unprecedented possibilities, they were also subject to censorship, bigotry, and political machinations."--Publisher's description."@en
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