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Black like me

Author: John Howard Griffin
Publisher: New York : Signet, [1996]
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 35th anniversary ed.View all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Deep South of the late 1950's was another country: a land of lynchings, segregated lunch counters, whites-only restrooms, and a color line etched in blood across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. White journalist John Howard Griffin, working for the black-owned magazine Sepia, decided to cross that line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Named Person: John Howard Griffin
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Howard Griffin
ISBN: 0451192036 9780451192035
OCLC Number: 36566361
Notes: Originally published: Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 1961.
Description: 192 p. ; 18 cm.
Responsibility: John Howard Griffin.
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Abstract:

The Deep South of the late 1950's was another country: a land of lynchings, segregated lunch counters, whites-only restrooms, and a color line etched in blood across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. White journalist John Howard Griffin, working for the black-owned magazine Sepia, decided to cross that line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man. What happened to John Howard Griffin--from the outside and within himself--as he made his way through the segregated Deep South is recorded in this searing work of nonfiction. Educated and soft-spoken, John Howard Griffin changed only the color of his skin. It was enough to make him hated...enough to nearly get him killed. His audacious, still chillingly relevant eyewitness history is a work about race and humanity every American should read.

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