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Blake as an artist

Author: David Bindman
Publisher: Oxford [England] : Phaidon ; New York : E.P. Dutton, 1977.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
I have attempted to approach the Illuminated Books from an art-historical point of view, a task which would have been impossible if the general consensus upon their meaning had not been established in the last few years, primarily by literary scholars. I am now convinced that Blake's mythology can be made sufficiently comprehensible to allow one to discuss his subject matter in a way comparable to that of any other  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Bindman, David, 1940-
Blake as an artist.
Oxford [Eng.] : Phaidon ; New York : E.P. Dutton, 1977
(OCoLC)647029429
Named Person: William Blake; Blake; William Blake; William Blake
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Bindman
ISBN: 071481637X 9780714816371
OCLC Number: 3315545
Notes: A Revision of the author's thesis, Courtauld Institute.
Description: 256 pages, [36] leaves of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
Contents: Introduction --
Section one : The emergence of the prophet. The visionary apprentice --
Student and independent engraver --
Painting and prophecy --
Section two : The infernal method. Illuminated printing and private mythology --
Swendenborg and Swedenborgianism --
The three tracts : There is no Natural Religion, series a and b, and All Religions are One --
The landscape of innocence --
Revolutionary intimations --
Section three : The prophecies. The continental myth --
The process of creation : from the Notebook to Songs of Experience --
The myth of creation : the completion of the Bible of Hell and the large colour prints --
The Lambeth Books and Blake's contemporaries --
Section four : Primitive and original ways of execution. Young's Night Thoughts and Gray's Poems --
The Butts Tempera Series --
Felpham --
The return to London --
Section five : Failure and self-justification. Blair's Grave --
The defense of visionary art --
Apocalypse and last judgment --
Section six : Milton and the epics. Milton and Jerusalem --
Cornus and Paradise Lost --
Illustrations to Milton's minor poems --
Section seven : The end of the pilgrimage. The new public --
The book of Job --
The last works --
Appendix A : A brief guide to the illuminated books --
Appendix B : A glossary of Blakean terms.
Responsibility: David Bindman.

Abstract:

I have attempted to approach the Illuminated Books from an art-historical point of view, a task which would have been impossible if the general consensus upon their meaning had not been established in the last few years, primarily by literary scholars. I am now convinced that Blake's mythology can be made sufficiently comprehensible to allow one to discuss his subject matter in a way comparable to that of any other artist of the past, but I am also aware that many scholars regard the Illuminated Books as more complex in thought than I do. It is clear to me that the Illuminated Books are not a self-contained aspect of Blake's work, but contribute directly to the understanding of the seemingly more conventional designs for the Bible, for Milton and for other writers. A central assumption of this book is that there is a fundamental unity between Blake's art and his writing, but my focus has still been predominantly upon the art, and I have made literary judgments only when they affect the argument. - Introduction.

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