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Blue arabesque : a search for the sublime

Author: Patricia Hampl
Publisher: Orlando : Harcourt, ©2006.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Patricia Hampl's meditation on the odalisque opens with her discovery of a Matisse painting in the Art Institute of Chicago: an aloof woman gazing at goldfish in a bowl, a mysterious Moroccan screen behind her. Here was a poster girl for twentieth-century feminism, free and untouchable; a welcome secular version of the nuns of Hampl's girlhood. Blue Arabesque explores the allure of that lounging figure so at odds  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Named Person: Patricia Hampl; Patricia Hampl; Henri Matisse; Patricia Hampl; Henri Matisse
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Patricia Hampl
ISBN: 0151015066 9780151015061 9780156033114 0156033119
OCLC Number: 64427319
Description: 215 p. ; 20 cm.
Responsibility: Patricia Hampl.
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Abstract:

"Patricia Hampl's meditation on the odalisque opens with her discovery of a Matisse painting in the Art Institute of Chicago: an aloof woman gazing at goldfish in a bowl, a mysterious Moroccan screen behind her. Here was a poster girl for twentieth-century feminism, free and untouchable; a welcome secular version of the nuns of Hampl's girlhood. Blue Arabesque explores the allure of that lounging figure so at odds with the increasing rush of the modern era, transporting us to the Cote d'Azur and across to North Africa, from cloister to harem. We encounter writers and artists as diverse as Eugene Delacroix, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Katherine Mansfield, all of them magnetized, as Matisse was, by the liquid light of the south of France. Returning always to Matisse's obsessive portraits of languid women, Hampl is startled to realize that they were not mere decorative indulgences but something much more."--Book jacket.

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PRAISE FOR PATRICIA HAMPL "Patricia Hampl is passionate about the demands of memory . . . Hampl's voice is learned yet intimate, a gift of herself to the reader."--Maureen Howard, author of "The Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Patricia Hampl's meditation on the odalisque opens with her discovery of a Matisse painting in the Art Institute of Chicago: an aloof woman gazing at goldfish in a bowl, a mysterious Moroccan screen behind her. Here was a poster girl for twentieth-century feminism, free and untouchable; a welcome secular version of the nuns of Hampl's girlhood. Blue Arabesque explores the allure of that lounging figure so at odds with the increasing rush of the modern era, transporting us to the Cote d'Azur and across to North Africa, from cloister to harem. We encounter writers and artists as diverse as Eugene Delacroix, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Katherine Mansfield, all of them magnetized, as Matisse was, by the liquid light of the south of France. Returning always to Matisse's obsessive portraits of languid women, Hampl is startled to realize that they were not mere decorative indulgences but something much more."--Book jacket."
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