skip to content
Body and soul Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Body and soul

Author: Abraham PolonskyJames Wong HoweFrancis D LyonRobert ParrishBob RobertsAll authors
Publisher: United States : A United Artists release, ©1947.
Edition/Format:   Film : Film   Visual material : English : [106 min. long version? (Playing time on release was 104 min., according to: Film daily yearbook, 1948.)]View all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In New York City, Charley Davis, the middleweight champion of the world, wakes up from a nightmare screaming the name 'Ben, ' then visits his mother, telling her that Ben died that day. After his mother bitterly tells Charley to leave, Charley sees Peg Born, his ex-girl friend, and although he kisses her, she falls limp, weeping on her bed. Charley, who is scheduled to fight an important match the next day, enters  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: UCLA preservation
Academy Award films
Features
Drama
Material Type: Film
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Abraham Polonsky; James Wong Howe; Francis D Lyon; Robert Parrish; Bob Roberts; Robert Rossen; Hugo Friedhofer; Emil Newman; Johnny Green; Edward Heyman; Robert Aldrich; Nathan Juran; Gustaf M Norin; Marion Herwood; Gunther V Fritsch; Rudolph Polk; Frank Webster; John Garfield; Lilli Palmer; Hazel Brooks; Anne Revere; William Conrad; Lloyd Goff; Joseph Pevney; Canada Lee; Art Smith; James Burke; Enterprise Studios.; United Artists Corporation.
OCLC Number: 423256753
Notes: Film noir; feature.
Bracketed cast credits from: Film daily yearbook, 1948.
Original distributor was United Artists, according to: Film daily yearbook, 1948.
Copyright: Roberts Productions, Inc.; 22Aug47; LP1279. Copyright notice on videodisc sleeve: c1947, Republic Pictures Corporation.
Received Academy Award for Editing.
"Passed by the National Board of Review." "Approved, MPAA, certificate no. 12435."
Credits: Music composed by Hugo Friedhofer; conducted by Emil Newman; the song 'Body and soul, ' music by Johnny Green, lyrics by Edward Heyman, Robert Sour and Frank Eyton. Executive production manager, Joseph C. Gilpin; assistant director, Robert Aldrich; art direction, Nathan Juran; set decoration, Edward J. Boyle; make-up supervision, Gustaf M. Norin; wardrobe designed by Marion Herwood Keyes. Montages directed by Gunther V. Fritsch; musical director, Rudolph Polk; sound engineer, Frank Webster; sound recording by Sound Services, Inc.
Cast: John Garfield and Lilli Palmer; and introducing Hazel Brooks as Alice; with Anne Revere, William Conrad, Lloyd Goff, Joseph Pevney, Canada Lee. [Art Smith, James Burke, Virginia Gregg, Peter Virgo, Joe Devlin, Mary Currier, Milton Kibbie, Artie Dorrell, Cy Ring].
Event notes: Some location shooting was done in New York City.
Other Titles: Body and soul.
Responsibility: the Enterprise Studios present ; original screenplay by Abraham Polonsky ; director of photography, James Wong Howe ; supervising editor, Francis D. Lyon ; film editor, Robert Parrish ; produced by Bob Roberts ; directed by Robert Rossen.

Abstract:

"In New York City, Charley Davis, the middleweight champion of the world, wakes up from a nightmare screaming the name 'Ben, ' then visits his mother, telling her that Ben died that day. After his mother bitterly tells Charley to leave, Charley sees Peg Born, his ex-girl friend, and although he kisses her, she falls limp, weeping on her bed. Charley, who is scheduled to fight an important match the next day, enters a nightclub where singer Alice performs, and gets drunk. Charley's manager, Roberts, tells Charley he must go fifteen rounds and win the fight by a decision. Charley then recalls his early days as a boxer: After winning his first amateur bout, Charley meets Peg, a beautiful, free-spirited painter living in Greenwich Village, and they fall in love. Charley's father, who owns a candy store, is killed when a bomb is thrown into a nearby speakeasy. Although Charley's mother hopes he will get an education, he is determined to be a fighter, and Peg encourages him. Promoter Quinn arranges a series of bouts for Charley, which he wins. After a year on the road, Charley, who has become cocky and is driven by money, returns to a swank apartment in New York and affectionately greets Peg. Roberts, who runs the fighting racket in New York, decides to set up a fixed fight between Charley and the black 'champ, ' Ben Chaplin, who is suffering from a blood clot in the brain. Roberts' scheme is to tell Ben that he and Charley will go fifteen rounds and that the bout will end in a decision, rather than a knockout. Charley is not told that Ben is ill, and Roberts cruelly says that the audience loves a killing. Later, Roberts goes to see Charley at his apartment, where Mrs. Davis is waiting for the boxer with Quinn and his girl friend, Alice. When Charley shows up with Peg, she is wearing a new dress and mink coat, having spent the afternoon drinking champagne. Although Charley's manager, Shorty Polaski, warns Peg to marry Charley immediately before he becomes a pawn of the mob, Roberts offers to help Charley win the championship and make him a wealthy man if he gives Roberts fifty percent of his take, fires Shorty, and postpones marriage. Shorty is suspicious of Roberts' conniving ways, but Peg lovingly agrees to put off her wedding. The night of the fight, Charley beats Ben repeatedly in the head and wins the title. After the fight, Ben's manager, Arnold, whom Roberts had double-crossed, protests to Roberts that Ben will undoubtedly die, but Roberts merely comments that 'everybody dies.' Later, as Peg and Charley celebrate in a bar with Roberts, Shorty tells Charley that he did not win fair, but foul, and that Roberts is the only one who won the fight. When Shorty then quits in disgust, Roberts coldly informs him that he had been getting only a handout from Charley. Shorty exits the bar, and Peg runs after him, but one of Roberts' thugs beats him up, and Peg runs for Charley's help. Charley rescues Shorty, but dazed, Shorty walks into an oncoming car and is killed. Peg then gives Charley an ultimatum: stop boxing or lose her. Charley breaks his engagement with Peg and wins a series of fights, becoming both richer and more careless. He begins dating Alice and buying her expensive gifts, then gambles away the rest of his winnings. Ben recovers, and Charley makes him his trainer. After years of holding the title, Charley is set to fight newcomer Jackie Marlowe, in a fixed fight: fifteen rounds and a decision. Jackie will win, and Charley will get $60,000, money he will use to bet against himself in the match. Alice, meanwhile, is hoping to share in Charley's fortune. Charley, however, visits Peg and, telling her he is about to fight his last fight, asks her to marry him. While Charley sleeps, Peg deposits his $60,000 in her bank account, unaware that he needs it to bet on the fight. At his mother's apartment, a grocer tells Charley that while the Nazis are killing Jews in Europe, Charley's old neighborhood is proudly placing money on Charley, whom they look up to with pride. Charley bitterly tells his mother and Peg that the fight is fixed, then demands his money back from Peg, accusing her of loving him for his money like everybody else. Hurt and enraged, Peg slaps Charley and leaves. While Ben trains Charley, he tries to convince him not to throw the fight. Roberts overhears and fires Ben, but Ben resists Roberts' orders and, in a frenzy of rage, pummels the air and falls dead. During the big match, after several rounds in which neither Charley nor Jackie are displaying any effort to fight, Jackie starts beating on Charley, and he realizes he has been set up by Roberts, just as Ben was. Charley fights back and wins the bout with a knockout. As he exits the ring, Roberts tries to warn Charley he will not get away with double-crossing him, but Charley says, 'What are you gonna do, kill me? Everybody dies.' Peg then rushes into his arms"--AFI catalog, 1941-1950.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/423256753>
library:oclcnum"423256753"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Movie
rdf:valueUnknown value: mot
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"[106 min. long version? (Playing time on release was 104 min., according to: Film daily yearbook, 1948.)]."
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"1947"
schema:datePublished"1947"
schema:description""In New York City, Charley Davis, the middleweight champion of the world, wakes up from a nightmare screaming the name 'Ben, ' then visits his mother, telling her that Ben died that day. After his mother bitterly tells Charley to leave, Charley sees Peg Born, his ex-girl friend, and although he kisses her, she falls limp, weeping on her bed. Charley, who is scheduled to fight an important match the next day, enters a nightclub where singer Alice performs, and gets drunk. Charley's manager, Roberts, tells Charley he must go fifteen rounds and win the fight by a decision. Charley then recalls his early days as a boxer: After winning his first amateur bout, Charley meets Peg, a beautiful, free-spirited painter living in Greenwich Village, and they fall in love. Charley's father, who owns a candy store, is killed when a bomb is thrown into a nearby speakeasy. Although Charley's mother hopes he will get an education, he is determined to be a fighter, and Peg encourages him. Promoter Quinn arranges a series of bouts for Charley, which he wins. After a year on the road, Charley, who has become cocky and is driven by money, returns to a swank apartment in New York and affectionately greets Peg. Roberts, who runs the fighting racket in New York, decides to set up a fixed fight between Charley and the black 'champ, ' Ben Chaplin, who is suffering from a blood clot in the brain. Roberts' scheme is to tell Ben that he and Charley will go fifteen rounds and that the bout will end in a decision, rather than a knockout. Charley is not told that Ben is ill, and Roberts cruelly says that the audience loves a killing. Later, Roberts goes to see Charley at his apartment, where Mrs. Davis is waiting for the boxer with Quinn and his girl friend, Alice. When Charley shows up with Peg, she is wearing a new dress and mink coat, having spent the afternoon drinking champagne. Although Charley's manager, Shorty Polaski, warns Peg to marry Charley immediately before he becomes a pawn of the mob, Roberts offers to help Charley win the championship and make him a wealthy man if he gives Roberts fifty percent of his take, fires Shorty, and postpones marriage. Shorty is suspicious of Roberts' conniving ways, but Peg lovingly agrees to put off her wedding. The night of the fight, Charley beats Ben repeatedly in the head and wins the title. After the fight, Ben's manager, Arnold, whom Roberts had double-crossed, protests to Roberts that Ben will undoubtedly die, but Roberts merely comments that 'everybody dies.' Later, as Peg and Charley celebrate in a bar with Roberts, Shorty tells Charley that he did not win fair, but foul, and that Roberts is the only one who won the fight. When Shorty then quits in disgust, Roberts coldly informs him that he had been getting only a handout from Charley. Shorty exits the bar, and Peg runs after him, but one of Roberts' thugs beats him up, and Peg runs for Charley's help. Charley rescues Shorty, but dazed, Shorty walks into an oncoming car and is killed. Peg then gives Charley an ultimatum: stop boxing or lose her. Charley breaks his engagement with Peg and wins a series of fights, becoming both richer and more careless. He begins dating Alice and buying her expensive gifts, then gambles away the rest of his winnings. Ben recovers, and Charley makes him his trainer. After years of holding the title, Charley is set to fight newcomer Jackie Marlowe, in a fixed fight: fifteen rounds and a decision. Jackie will win, and Charley will get $60,000, money he will use to bet against himself in the match. Alice, meanwhile, is hoping to share in Charley's fortune. Charley, however, visits Peg and, telling her he is about to fight his last fight, asks her to marry him. While Charley sleeps, Peg deposits his $60,000 in her bank account, unaware that he needs it to bet on the fight. At his mother's apartment, a grocer tells Charley that while the Nazis are killing Jews in Europe, Charley's old neighborhood is proudly placing money on Charley, whom they look up to with pride. Charley bitterly tells his mother and Peg that the fight is fixed, then demands his money back from Peg, accusing her of loving him for his money like everybody else. Hurt and enraged, Peg slaps Charley and leaves. While Ben trains Charley, he tries to convince him not to throw the fight. Roberts overhears and fires Ben, but Ben resists Roberts' orders and, in a frenzy of rage, pummels the air and falls dead. During the big match, after several rounds in which neither Charley nor Jackie are displaying any effort to fight, Jackie starts beating on Charley, and he realizes he has been set up by Roberts, just as Ben was. Charley fights back and wins the bout with a knockout. As he exits the ring, Roberts tries to warn Charley he will not get away with double-crossing him, but Charley says, 'What are you gonna do, kill me? Everybody dies.' Peg then rushes into his arms"--AFI catalog, 1941-1950."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1110693006>
schema:genre"Features"@en
schema:genre"Drama"@en
schema:genre"Academy Award films"@en
schema:genre"UCLA preservation"@en
schema:hasPart
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Body and soul"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.