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Booher's rules of business grammar : 101 fast and easy ways to correct the most common errors

Author: Dianna Daniels Booher
Publisher: New York : McGraw-Hill, ©2009.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From the Publisher: Does your client owe the principal or principle? Is your company moving forwards or forward? Do you have over ten years' experience, or more than ten years' experience? Proper use of the written and spoken word determines whether or not you move ahead in your career. In Booher's Rules of Business Grammar, business communication guru Dianna Booher identifies the top 101 mistakes made in emails,  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Dianna Daniels Booher
ISBN: 9780071486682 0071486682
OCLC Number: 214322899
Description: xxii, 294 pages ; 21 cm
Contents: Acknowledgments --
Introduction: No louding --
Part 1: Verbosity About Verbs: The Big Blunders --
1: Let's dialogue about verbing words : turning perfectly fine nouns into verbs --
2: She went missing: sucking the life out of strong verbs --
3: Staying regular: irregular verbs --
4: He don't understand: the irregular verb to do --
5: They had went to my office earlier in the day: the irregular verb to go --
6: He come back from overseas early: the irregular verb to come --
7: I seen him leave: the irregular verb to see --
8: Lie or lay before I knock you off your feet: the lie/lay limbo --
9: He came, he saw, he conquered: don't be lax about tense changes --
10: If I was you: wishful thinking and the subjunctive mood --
11: Pushy people demanding their way: the subjunctive mood continued --
12: There's problems with that!: expletive deleted --
13: I wish I may, I wish I might could you tell me which verb to use tonight? : the may/might dilemma --
14: Sue is one who: the one of a kind or one of a category argument --
15: Separation anxiety: subjects and verbs that get split apart --
16: Which end is up?: complements of the verb or the chef --
17: Acting alone or with accomplices?: verbs after collective nouns --
18: None of your business: definitely indefinite pronouns --
19: Total 'em up: verbs with time, money, quantities, fractions, and percentages --
20: Kaleidoscope effect : a and the before amounts --
21: Seesaw effect: either/or, neither/nor, not only/but also --
Part 2: Pesky Pronouns: The Understudies --
22: Just between you and I: the case for objective pronouns --
23: Me and Pongo know him: the case for nominative pronouns --
24: Me, myself, and I: reflexive pronouns flexing their muscles --
25: To whom it may concern: who versus whom --
26: She's taller than me: pronouns after than --
27: You know what they always say about that: unclear references --
28: Which hunts: that versus which --
29: Is Shamu a who?: people who or that? --
Part 3: Modifier Mishaps --
30: Misplaced modifiers that mystify: putting them in their place --
31: Can you hook me up?: dangling modifiers --
32: Which is what I always say: dangling whichs --
33: Troublesome twosomes: one word or two? --
34: Learn this backwards and forwards: the unnecessary-S --
35: Honor or an honor to be here?: the articles: a or an? Part 4: Adjective And Adverb Attitudes --
36: She did things different: adjectives modifying verbs-a no-no --
37: Team played real good: well versus good --
38: This job is more simpler than what I had before: comparing with more and most --
39: It's the most unique gift I've ever received!: unique, round, square, surrounded, perfect-or not? --
40: This checkout-20 items or less: less versus fewer --
41: He has over a million miles on that airline: over versus more than --
42: I like smaller cars: incomplete comparisons --
Part 5: Parallel Bars And Balance Beams --
43: To balance or not to balance-that is the question parallelism perfected --
44: I worked, waited, and was rewarded: parallelism with a viewpoint change --
45: Verbs with attitude: active and passive voice --
46: Time marches on-but at the same pace: don't be lax about tense changes --
Part 6: Punctuation Problems --
47: Comma hiccups: unnecessary commas --
48: Comma clauses and pauses: essential or nonessential-that is the question --
49: Hi Hank, what do you think Frank?: commas when addressing people directly --
50: Dear spike: punctuation after salutations --
51: She needs no introduction: commas to introduce --
52: Punctuation powerless: run-ons-semicolons slip-sliding away --
53: One car, two cars, three cars, four: commas to separate equal things --
54: Alpha and the Omega: enclosing commas come in pairs --
55: Colon scope-here's the scoop: colons before a list --
56: Fragmented thoughts: unintentional fragments --
57: Would you send me your address please: indirect questions and softened commands --
58: Can you hear me now?: indirect quotations --
59: Inside or outside?: where, oh where, do the quotation marks go? --
60: Ripley's believe it or not: quotation marks to change the tone or the meaning --
61: Spare tires: single quotation marks --
Part 7: Perplexing Possessives --
62: Whatever possessed me!: it's versus its --
63: Who's on firsts?: whose versus who's --
64: Why are you so possessive?: plurals confused with possessives --
65: Yours, mine, and ours: joint ownership-who gets the apostrophe? --
66: Do you love me-or what I can do for you?: possessives before gerunds --
67: It's about time: possessives with time and amounts --
68: Overly possessive: descriptive or possessive? Part 8: Reminders About Redundancies --
69: Past experience-is there any other kind?: little-word padding and redundant ideas --
70: Continue on : redundant verb add-ons --
71: Subject matter worth discussing: redundant nouns --
72: Reason is because: doublespeak --
73: Going to bat for that's: do you need the that? --
74: I get your point-but do you get mine?: et cetera and so forth --
75: Where's he at?: unnecessary prepositions --
Part 9: Miscellaneous Matters --
76: Oh, say, can you see?: mispronunciation --
77: What are the odds to start?: starting a sentence with a number --
78: Nonsense: nonwords, fillers, and colloquialisms --
79: You should of known better!: contractions that aren't --
80: Got trouble?: have versus got? --
81: Make a dash for it: distinct uses for hyphens and dashes --
82: Dash away, dash away, dash away all: dashes versus well-organized sentences --
83: No death knell for the hyphen: hyphens before related adjectives --
84: Matching body parts: correlative links --
85: Up a tree without a paddle: mixed metaphors --
86: As much or more than most: prepackaged comparisons --
87: Doing the splits: split infinitives --
88: Without just cause: without: what it can and can't do --
89: Getting top billing: phrasal prepositions --
90: Branding issue: capitalization rules for the road --
91: Name, rank, and serial number: capitalization with titles and positions --
92: Undercapitalized with no regrets: the case for lowercase --
Part 10: Misspelled And Misused Words --
93: Would you spell that for me?: frequently misspelled words --
94: May I see your references, please?: spelling rules for plural forms --
95: Messing with my head: hyphenate? solid? two words? --
96: I resemble that remark: affect versus effect --
97: Do I have your guarantee? ensure, insure, assure? --
98: It's a matter of principle: principle versus principal --
99: Good example: eg versus ie --
100: How are you? nauseated versus nauseous --
101: Is success imminent?: eminent versus imminent --
Bibliography --
Resources by Dianna Booher --
For more information --
Index.
Other Titles: Rules of business grammar
Responsibility: Dianna Booher.
More information:

Abstract:

Easy memory tricks to ensure proper grammar in business presentations, emails, letters, and much more  Read more...

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