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The Book of Cerne : prayer, patronage, and power in ninth-century England

Author: Michelle Brown
Publisher: London : British Library ; Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, 1996.
Dissertation: Based on the author's Thesis (Ph. D.--University of London).
Series: British Library studies in medieval culture.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : National government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In this full-length study of the Book of Cerne (Cambridge University Library, MS Ll.1.10), the first since the edition of almost a hundred years ago, Michael P. Brown invites a fresh consideration not only of dating and authorship of the manuscript, but also of its purpose and content. The Book of Cerne is a prayerbook (meditating upon the themes of salvation and the communion of saints) made for a patron whose  Read more...
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Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Government publication, National government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michelle Brown
ISBN: 071230486X 9780712304863 0802041132 9780802041135
OCLC Number: 35632260
Description: 252 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Series Title: British Library studies in medieval culture.
Responsibility: Michelle P. Brown.

Abstract:

Revealing a complex interplay of text, script and image, this book considers the only surviving illuminated manuscript which can be firmly attributed to the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia. It places  Read more...

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schema:reviewBody""In this full-length study of the Book of Cerne (Cambridge University Library, MS Ll.1.10), the first since the edition of almost a hundred years ago, Michael P. Brown invites a fresh consideration not only of dating and authorship of the manuscript, but also of its purpose and content. The Book of Cerne is a prayerbook (meditating upon the themes of salvation and the communion of saints) made for a patron whose cultural tastes embraced Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Carolingian, Roman and Byzantine materials. With its complex interplay of text, script and image, it offers a fascinating insight into Insular culture and is the only surviving illuminated manuscript which can be firmly attributed to the powerful Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia."--Jacket."
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