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Broadway, the American musical. / [Part 3], I got plenty of nuttin' (1929-1942). [Part 4], Oh, what a beautiful mornin' (1943-1960). Preview this item
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Broadway, the American musical. / [Part 3], I got plenty of nuttin' (1929-1942). [Part 4], Oh, what a beautiful mornin' (1943-1960).

Author: Michael KantorJulie AndrewsGhost Light Films.WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)Nihon Hōsō Kyōkai.All authors
Publisher: [Alexandria, Va.] : PBS Video, [2006, 2004]
Edition/Format:   eVideo : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Part 1: The Great Depression proved to be a dynamic period of creative growth on Broadway, and a dichotomy in the musical theater emerged. Productions like Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" offered glamour and high times as an escape, while others -- such as "Of Thee I Sing," which satirized the American political system, and the remarkable WPA production of "The Cradle Will Rock," about a steel strike -- dealt directly  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Video recordings for the hearing impaired
Material Type: Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File, Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Kantor; Julie Andrews; Ghost Light Films.; WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.); Nihon Hōsō Kyōkai.; British Broadcasting Corporation.; Carlton International.; PBS Video.
OCLC Number: 183717687
Language Note: Close-captioned.
Notes: Originally broadcast in 2004.
Performer(s): Host: Julie Andrews.
Description: 1 streaming video file (120 min.) : digital, MP4 file, sd., col. with b&w sequences.
Details: Mode of access: Internet.; Online video system requirements: Flash 6.0 (or higher).
Other Titles: I got plenty of nuttin'
Oh, what a beautiful mornin'
Responsibility: a co-production of Ghost Light Films, Thirteen/WNET New York, NHK and BBC in association with Carlton International ; produced by Jeff Dupre, Michael Kantor and Sally Rosenthal ; written by Marc Fields, Michael Kantor & Laurence Maslon ; directed by Michael Kantor.

Abstract:

Part 1: The Great Depression proved to be a dynamic period of creative growth on Broadway, and a dichotomy in the musical theater emerged. Productions like Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" offered glamour and high times as an escape, while others -- such as "Of Thee I Sing," which satirized the American political system, and the remarkable WPA production of "The Cradle Will Rock," about a steel strike -- dealt directly with the era's social and political concerns. When Bing Crosby recorded "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime," the doleful Broadway ballad took the hit parade by surprise. Part 2: The new partnership of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II changed the face of Broadway forever, beginning with the record-breaking "Oklahoma!" in 1943, featuring a landmark ballet by Agnes de Mille. "Carousel" and "South Pacific" then set the standard for decades to come by pioneering a musical where story is all-important. For challenging the country to confront its deep-seated racial bigotry, "South Pacific" won the Pulitzer Prize. In "On the Town," an exuberant team of novices -- Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden, Adolph Green, and Jerome Robbins -- captured the energy, humor, and pathos of New York City during World War II. Irving Berlin triumphed again with "Annie Get Your Gun," featuring Ethel Merman and the unofficial anthem of the American musical theater, "There's No Business Like Show Business."

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Linked Data


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