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Buying green

Author: Jennifer Weeks
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : CQ Press, 2008.
Series: CQ researcher, v. 18, no. 9.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Americans will spend an estimated $500 billion this year on products and services that claim to be good for the environment because they contain non-toxic ingredients or produce little pollution and waste. While some shoppers buy green to help save the planet, others are concerned about personal health and safety. Whatever their motives, eco-consumers are reshaping U.S. markets. To attract socially conscious buyers,  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Jennifer Weeks
OCLC Number: 224493041
Notes: Title from caption (viewed on April 16, 2008).
"February 29, 2008."
Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Series Title: CQ researcher, v. 18, no. 9.
Other Titles: Does it really help the environment?
Responsibility: by Jennifer Weeks.

Abstract:

Americans will spend an estimated $500 billion this year on products and services that claim to be good for the environment because they contain non-toxic ingredients or produce little pollution and waste. While some shoppers buy green to help save the planet, others are concerned about personal health and safety. Whatever their motives, eco-consumers are reshaping U.S. markets. To attract socially conscious buyers, manufacturers are designing new, green products and packaging, altering production processes and using sustainable materials. But some of these products may be wastes of money. Federal regulators are reviewing green labeling claims to see whether they mislead consumers, while some critics say that government mandates promoting environmentally preferable products distort markets and raise prices. Even if green marketing delivers on its pledges, many environmentalists say that sustainability is not a matter of buying green but of buying less.

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