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Campaign finance reform

Author: Thomas J Billitteri
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : CQ Press, 2008.
Series: CQ researcher, v. 18, no. 22.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
As the 2008 presidential contest continues, the campaign finance system is in upheaval. Six years after Congress passed the landmark Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act to help curb the influence of unregulated "soft" money in politics, the so-called McCain-Feingold law is facing court challenges and persistent claims that it infringes on free-speech rights. Meanwhile, the system of public funding for federal campaigns  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas J Billitteri
OCLC Number: 232961574
Notes: Title from caption (viewed on June 30, 2008).
"June 13, 2008."
Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Series Title: CQ researcher, v. 18, no. 22.
Other Titles: Have efforts to rein in political donations failed?
Responsibility: by Thomas J. Billitteri.

Abstract:

As the 2008 presidential contest continues, the campaign finance system is in upheaval. Six years after Congress passed the landmark Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act to help curb the influence of unregulated "soft" money in politics, the so-called McCain-Feingold law is facing court challenges and persistent claims that it infringes on free-speech rights. Meanwhile, the system of public funding for federal campaigns is teetering. Presumptive Democratic nominee Barack Obama is poised to be the first major-party presidential candidate to bypass the system in a general election. The Federal Election Commission, which enforces campaign finance laws, has been paralyzed by partisan bickering. And spurred partly by the effects of McCain-Feingold and the shortcomings of the public-financing system, candidates have been turning to small donors, who are responding in unprecedented numbers.
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