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Can machines think?

Author: Lynn PooleJohn W MauchlyPaul KaneJoel ChasemanJohns Hopkins University.All authors
Publisher: [Baltimore, Md.] : Johns Hopkins University, [2003]
Edition/Format:   VHS video : VHS tape   Visual material   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This program discusses the scientific and business uses of computers, such as calculating 1950 census data for the U.S. Bureau of Census. It also shows the assembly of UNIVAC (universal automatic computer) at the Remington Rand plant. Dr. John W. Mauchly explains and demonstrates how a computer works, including creation of the magnetic tapes that give instruction to a computer. The program concludes that no, a  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Lynn Poole; John W Mauchly; Paul Kane; Joel Chaseman; Johns Hopkins University.; WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.); Du Mont Television Network.
OCLC Number: 53957880
Credits: Lynn Poole, producer ; Paul Kane, director ; Joel Chaseman, narrator ; produced by WAAM television station in Baltimore, Md. for the Dumont Network.
Performer(s): Lynn Poole, John W. Mauchly, presenters.
Event notes: Originally broadcast as a segment of the television program Johns Hopkins science review on October 27, 1952 from the studios of WAAM in Baltimore, Md.
Description: 1 videocassette (29 min., 45 sec.) : sd., b&w ; 1/2 in.
Details: VHS.
Other Titles: Johns Hopkins science review (Television program)

Abstract:

This program discusses the scientific and business uses of computers, such as calculating 1950 census data for the U.S. Bureau of Census. It also shows the assembly of UNIVAC (universal automatic computer) at the Remington Rand plant. Dr. John W. Mauchly explains and demonstrates how a computer works, including creation of the magnetic tapes that give instruction to a computer. The program concludes that no, a computer cannot think.

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