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Can we trust the BBC?

Author: Robin Aitken
Publisher: London : Continuum, 2007.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The BBC is the most famous media brand in the world, and is growing bigger and more powerful every year. It has a reputation for honest and accurate journalism, but this book argues that the Corporation has a strong internal culture which is biased to the left and which imperils its objectivity. By analysing the BBC's coverage of issues like Europe and Northern Ireland it demonstrates how some groups and viewpoints  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Aitken, Robin.
Can we trust the BBC?
London : Continuum, 2007
(OCoLC)652512449
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Robin Aitken
ISBN: 0826494277 9780826494276
OCLC Number: 73956002
Description: 213 p. ; 21 cm.
Contents: The best broadcaster in the world? --
A reporter's progress --
Blowing the whistle --
Who are these people? --
The best European --
The despised tribes --
Today at war --
The moral maze --
Testimonies: 'A foghorn bellowing at the nation' --
Conclusion.
Responsibility: Robin Aitken.
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Abstract:

Asks a question: can we trust the BBC? This book argues that the Corporation's pervasive left wing political culture imperils its impartiality. It demonstrates how some groups get favourable  Read more...

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'Can we trust the BBC? According to .. Aitken, the short answer is no. Aitken's is a sceptical question. The straight-talking, right-thinking Aitken is the man to administer it.' Times Literary Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""The BBC is the most famous media brand in the world, and is growing bigger and more powerful every year. It has a reputation for honest and accurate journalism, but this book argues that the Corporation has a strong internal culture which is biased to the left and which imperils its objectivity. By analysing the BBC's coverage of issues like Europe and Northern Ireland it demonstrates how some groups and viewpoints get favourable treatment, while others are left out in the cold." "The book examines the concept of 'public sector broadcasting' and asks if that should merely mean radio and television free of commercial bias. It looks at the background and political leanings of prominent BBC journalists and asks what it takes to prosper in the organization. It analyses the BBC's treatment of moral debates and reveals a secret report that was highly critical of Panorama. Drawing on the author's 25 years as a BBC reporter, the book blends analysis and polemic to paint a picture of life inside the news machine from a uniquely privileged point of view. It also tells the story of how the BBC responded to a dissident in its own ranks. This book asks a big question; how much trust should we put in the BBC, and how can we make sure it lives up to its obligations to be even-handed and impartial?"--BOOK JACKET."
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