skip to content
Canvas Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Canvas

Author: Adam Zagajewski; Renata Gorczynski; Benjamin Ivry; C K Williams
Publisher: New York : Farrar Straus Giroux, 1991.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Canvas, Adam Zagajewski's second volume of poems to appear in English, in a translation by Renata Gorczynski, Benjamin Ivry, and C.K. Williams, represents one of the new Europe's most commanding lyric voices in full power. Zagajewski's poetry portrays a contemporary spiritual reality haunted by paradox: the world he evokes is visited by the specters of totalitarianism, genocide, brute force, but also by natural
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Translations
Translations into English
Named Person: Adam Zagajewski; Adam Zagajewski
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Adam Zagajewski; Renata Gorczynski; Benjamin Ivry; C K Williams
ISBN: 0374118671 9780374118679
OCLC Number: 25454259
Description: vii, 81 pages ; 22 cm
Other Titles: Poems.
Responsibility: Adam Zagajewski ; translated from the Polish by Renata Gorczynski ; Benjamin Ivry ; and C.K. Williams.

Abstract:

Canvas, Adam Zagajewski's second volume of poems to appear in English, in a translation by Renata Gorczynski, Benjamin Ivry, and C.K. Williams, represents one of the new Europe's most commanding lyric voices in full power. Zagajewski's poetry portrays a contemporary spiritual reality haunted by paradox: the world he evokes is visited by the specters of totalitarianism, genocide, brute force, but also by natural beauty, reason, joy, and love. "And what if Heraclitus and.

Parmenides / are both right," Zagajewski asks, "and two worlds exist side by side, / one serene, the other insane ..." "Who owns the earth ... / By day it's conquered / by square-skulled men: / police. At nights / we reclaim our homeland." The outer world, political reality, is opposed by another realm, equally immediate and tangible if evanescent, where "despair turns to rapture; and the hard fruits of stars in the sky / ripen like grapes and beauty endures, shaken.

Unperturbed." Though he came to maturity in the upheavals of late Communist Poland and since 1981 has lived in France, Zagajewski is not a poet of exile. The condition he describes is existential, universal. His occasions are instants of contemplation, crucial if unremarkable moments in the lives of his heroes--Schubert, Simone Weil, Mozart, Bruckner--and in his own daily experience. The dualism of Zagajewski's art is double-edged. "Clearly nothing links enlightenment.

And the dark pain of cruelty," he writes. "At least two kingdoms exist / if not more." Cruelty coexists with enlightenment, true; but the reverse is also the case. And this is perhaps the ultimate spur for the questioning, the wonder, the insatiable hunger for being that are the most insistent and profound themes in this great poet's work.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/25454259>
library:oclcnum"25454259"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st ed."
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1991"
schema:description"Canvas, Adam Zagajewski's second volume of poems to appear in English, in a translation by Renata Gorczynski, Benjamin Ivry, and C.K. Williams, represents one of the new Europe's most commanding lyric voices in full power. Zagajewski's poetry portrays a contemporary spiritual reality haunted by paradox: the world he evokes is visited by the specters of totalitarianism, genocide, brute force, but also by natural beauty, reason, joy, and love. "And what if Heraclitus and."@en
schema:description"Parmenides / are both right," Zagajewski asks, "and two worlds exist side by side, / one serene, the other insane ..." "Who owns the earth ... / By day it's conquered / by square-skulled men: / police. At nights / we reclaim our homeland." The outer world, political reality, is opposed by another realm, equally immediate and tangible if evanescent, where "despair turns to rapture; and the hard fruits of stars in the sky / ripen like grapes and beauty endures, shaken."@en
schema:description"And the dark pain of cruelty," he writes. "At least two kingdoms exist / if not more." Cruelty coexists with enlightenment, true; but the reverse is also the case. And this is perhaps the ultimate spur for the questioning, the wonder, the insatiable hunger for being that are the most insistent and profound themes in this great poet's work."@en
schema:description"Unperturbed." Though he came to maturity in the upheavals of late Communist Poland and since 1981 has lived in France, Zagajewski is not a poet of exile. The condition he describes is existential, universal. His occasions are instants of contemplation, crucial if unremarkable moments in the lives of his heroes--Schubert, Simone Weil, Mozart, Bruckner--and in his own daily experience. The dualism of Zagajewski's art is double-edged. "Clearly nothing links enlightenment."@en
schema:exampleOfWork
schema:genre"Translations"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Canvas"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.