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The case for soft partition in Iraq

Author: Edward P Joseph; Michael E O'Hanlon; Brookings Institution. Saban Center for Middle East Policy.
Publisher: Washington, DC : Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution, [2007]
Series: Analysis paper (Brookings Institution. Saban Center for Middle East Policy), no. 12.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"To make soft partition viable, several imposing practical challenges must be addressed. These include sharing oil revenue among the regions, creating reasonably secure boundaries between them, and restructuring the international troop presence. Helping minority populations relocate if they wish requires a plan for providing security to those who are moving as well as those left behind. That means the international  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Edward P Joseph; Michael E O'Hanlon; Brookings Institution. Saban Center for Middle East Policy.
OCLC Number: 144610826
Notes: Title from title screen (viewed July 30, 2007).
"June 2007."
Description: xiii, 41 p. : digital, PDF file.
Details: System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.; Mode of access: Internet via the World Wide Web.
Series Title: Analysis paper (Brookings Institution. Saban Center for Middle East Policy), no. 12.
Responsibility: Edward P. Joseph, Michael E. O'Hanlon.

Abstract:

"To make soft partition viable, several imposing practical challenges must be addressed. These include sharing oil revenue among the regions, creating reasonably secure boundaries between them, and restructuring the international troop presence. Helping minority populations relocate if they wish requires a plan for providing security to those who are moving as well as those left behind. That means the international troop presence will not decline immediately, although we estimate that it could be reduced substantially within eighteen months or so. Population movements also necessitate housing swaps and job creation programs. Soft partition cannot be imposed from the outside. Indeed, it need not be. Iraq's new constitution, approved by plebiscite in October 2005, already permits the creation of "regions." Still, a framework for soft partition would go much further than Iraq has to date. Among other things, it would involve the organized movement of two million to five million Iraqis, which could only happen safely if influential leaders encouraged their supporters to cooperate, and if there were a modicum of agreement on where to draw border and how to share oil revenue"--P. x.

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