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Catholics, Anglicans, and Puritans : seventeenth century essays

Author: H R Trevor-Roper
Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1988, ©1987.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Renaissance Essays, published in 1985, confirmed Hugh Trevor-Roper's reputation as one of the most distinguished writers of history and as an unequaled master of the historical essay. Received with critical acclaim in both England and the United States, the volume gathered wide-ranging essays on both British and European history from the fifteenth century to the early seventeenth centuries. This sequel, Catholics,
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Genre/Form: Church history
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: H R Trevor-Roper
ISBN: 0226812286 9780226812281
OCLC Number: 15793504
Description: xiii, 317 pages ; 26 cm
Contents: Introduction --
NICHOLAS HILL, THE ENGLISH ATOMIST: The mystery man --
The evidence --
Sir Robert Basset and his compiracy --
Bruno and Hill --
Hill's utopia --
LAUDIANISM AND POLITICAL POWER: An intellectual movement --
England and Europe --
The struggle for power --
The model diocese --
The battle for the universities --
The new synthesis --
'No popery!' --
Conclusion --
JAMES USSHER, ARCHBISHOP OF ARMAGH: A man for all seasons? --
The Protestant philosophy of history --
The organization of research --
The new regime in Ireland --
The Protestantism of the ancient Irish --
The civil war --
The date of creation --
The inheritance --
THE GREAT TEW CIRCLE: Falkland and his circle --
The circle after Falkland --
The 'Socinian' tradition --
The philosophy of the Great Tew --
Chillingworth --
Clarendon --
Hammond --
Conclusion --
MILTON IN POLITICS: Milton and the Revolution --Egotism, humanism, prophecy --
A Spenserian epic --
Jubilee and resurrection --
Withdrawal and return --
True liberty --
A model of government --
The end of ideology --
Abbreviations.
Responsibility: by Hugh Trevor-Roper.
More information:

Abstract:

Renaissance Essays, published in 1985, confirmed Hugh Trevor-Roper's reputation as one of the most distinguished writers of history and as an unequaled master of the historical essay. Received with critical acclaim in both England and the United States, the volume gathered wide-ranging essays on both British and European history from the fifteenth century to the early seventeenth centuries. This sequel, Catholics, Anglicans, and Puritans, is composed of five previously unpublished essays on the intellectual and religious movements which lay behind the Puritan revolution in England and Ireland.

The opening essay, a skillful work of historical detection, investigates the strange career of Nicholas Hill. In "Laudianism and Political Power," Trevor-Roper returns to the subject of his first, now classic, book. He analyzes the real significance of the ecclesiastical movement associated with Archbishop Laud and speculates on what might have happened if the Stuarts had not abandoned it. "James Ussher, Archbishop of Armagh" deals with a key figure in the intellectual and religious life of his time. A long essay on "The Great Tew Circle" reinstates Lord Falkland as an important influence on the continuity of ideas through the English revolution. The final essay reassesses the political ideology of Milton.

English intellectual history, as Trevor-Roper constructs it here for the seventeenth century, is conditioned by its social and political context. Always engaging and fresh, these essays deal with currently interesting historical topics and up-to-date controversies.

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Linked Data


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