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The cell. / The hidden kingdom

Author: Adam RutherfordAndrew ThompsonBBC Education & Training.British Broadcasting Corporation.BBC Scotland.All authors
Publisher: Hamilton, N.J. : Films for the Humanities & Sciences, [2010]
Edition/Format:   DVD video : NTSC color broadcast system : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The first in a three-part series in which biologist Adam Rutherford looks in depth at cells. This part begins by looking back to the first discovery of a cell under the microscope, in Holland, 1674. The history of the cell is bound up with the history of microscopes and the improvement of lenses. We hear how Antoni van Leeuwenhoek discovered the microscopic world of cell life in the late 17th century, and the role  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Educational films
Science television programs
Documentary television programs
Nonfiction television programs
Video recordings for the hearing impaired
Named Person: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek; Robert Hooke; Franciscus Mercurius van Helmont; Robert Brown; Joseph Lister, Baron; Theodor Schwann; M J Schleiden; Louis Pasteur; Robert Remak; Rudolf Virchow; Robert Brown; Franciscus Mercurius van Helmont; Robert Hooke; Antoni van Leeuwenhoek; Joseph Lister, Baron; Louis Pasteur; Robert Remak; M J Schleiden; Theodor Schwann; Rudolf Virchow
Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Adam Rutherford; Andrew Thompson; BBC Education & Training.; British Broadcasting Corporation.; BBC Scotland.; BBC Active (Firm); Films for the Humanities & Sciences (Firm)
OCLC Number: 795194171
Language Note: In English; closed-captioned.
Notes: Broadcast on 9 August, 2009.
Performer(s): Presenter: Dr. Adam Rutherford.
Target Audience: General public.
Description: 1 videodisc (50 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Details: DVD-R, NTSC; widescreen.
Other Titles: Hidden kingdom : early discoveries in cell science
Early discoveries in cell science
Responsibility: BBC Education & Training ; produced and directed by Andrew Thompson ; BBC Scotland.

Abstract:

The first in a three-part series in which biologist Adam Rutherford looks in depth at cells. This part begins by looking back to the first discovery of a cell under the microscope, in Holland, 1674. The history of the cell is bound up with the history of microscopes and the improvement of lenses. We hear how Antoni van Leeuwenhoek discovered the microscopic world of cell life in the late 17th century, and the role of Robert Hooke in deciphering this. Eventually, though, the imagination of the microscope pioneers wasn't matched by their technology. However, philosophers such as van Helmont believed that life emerged spontaneously and did not make a connection with the findings of Hooke and Leeuwenhoek. Robert Brown discovered the nucleus while researching plant life at Kew Gardens; this was to be a major influence on cell theory as was his later Brownian motion to inspire atomic theory. The design of greater microscopes was begun by Joseph Lister; Theodor Schwann utilised this new technology when investigating human and animal flesh but still it was only when he encountered the botanical studies of Matthias Schleiden that the theory of cell life was born. However, they were mistaken in thinking that new cells emerged through spontaneous generation. In Paris, Louis Pasteur successfully countered this theory but it was Robert Remak who discovered cell division, founding the field of embryology.

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