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The challenge : Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, and the fight over presidential power

Author: Jonathan Mahler
Publisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In November 2001, Salim Ahmed Hamdan, a 31-year-old Yemeni, was captured and turned over to U.S. forces in Afghanistan. After confessing to being Osama bin Laden's driver, Hamdan was transferred to Guantánamo Bay, and was soon designated by President Bush for trial before a special military tribunal. The Pentagon assigned a military defense lawyer to represent him, a 35-year-old graduate of the Naval Academy,  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Mahler, Jonathan, 1969-
Challenge.
New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008
(OCoLC)609317253
Named Person: Salim Ahmed Hamdan; Donald Rumsfeld
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Jonathan Mahler
ISBN: 9780374223205 0374223203
OCLC Number: 191258624
Notes: "Portions of this work originally appeared, in somewhat different form, in the June 13, 2004, January 8, 2006, and July 9, 2006, issues of The New York Times Magazine"--T.p. verso.
Description: 334 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: The JAG --
The trials --
VUCA --
The professor --
The civil power --
A drowning man --
The lawsuit --
Tugging the lion's tail --
"Oh, I doubt that seriously, sir" --
"Judge assigned-we won the lottery" --
An indefinite recess --
"We're going to crush you" --
Who we are --
The Supreme Court responds --
Getting to five --
Where's the food? --
The countdown --
The argument --
The heroes of Guantanamo?
Responsibility: Jonathan Mahler.
More information:

Abstract:

In November 2001, Salim Ahmed Hamdan, a 31-year-old Yemeni, was captured and turned over to U.S. forces in Afghanistan. After confessing to being Osama bin Laden's driver, Hamdan was transferred to Guantánamo Bay, and was soon designated by President Bush for trial before a special military tribunal. The Pentagon assigned a military defense lawyer to represent him, a 35-year-old graduate of the Naval Academy, Lieutenant Commander Charles Swift. No one expected Swift to mount much of a defense. The rules of the tribunals, America's first in over fifty years, were stacked against him--assuming he wasn't expected to throw the game altogether. Instead, with the help of a young constitutional law professor at Georgetown, Neal Katyal, Swift sued the Bush Administration over the legality of the tribunals. In 2006, Katyal argued the case before the Supreme Court and won. This is the inside story of what may be the most important decision on presidential power and the rule of law in the history of the Supreme Court.--From publisher description.

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