skip to content
Challenging the public realm : gated communities in history Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Challenging the public realm : gated communities in history

Author: Jill L Grant; Dalhousie University. School of Planning,
Publisher: Halifax, Nova Scotia : School of Planning, Dalhousie University, Beaconsfield, Quebec : Canadian Electronic Library, 2008. 2014.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Private and fortified communities are by no means new in urban history. Cities from ancient times through the Middle Ages often featured walls for protection from inter-group hostility. By the 19th century, though, with pacification and internal security contributing to the development of the modern nation state, the open city became a more characteristic form in Western nations (Mumford, 1961). Rulers and  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Case studies
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Jill L Grant; Dalhousie University. School of Planning,
OCLC Number: 879668849
Notes: "27 September, 2008."
Description: 1 online resource (13 pages) : colour illustrations
Responsibility: Jill L Grant.
More information:

Abstract:

Private and fortified communities are by no means new in urban history. Cities from ancient times through the Middle Ages often featured walls for protection from inter-group hostility. By the 19th century, though, with pacification and internal security contributing to the development of the modern nation state, the open city became a more characteristic form in Western nations (Mumford, 1961). Rulers and governments invested in urban infrastructure like parks, streets, and sidewalks, creating an improved public realm. While the public spaces and streets of Victorian era cities were in theory open, in practice they were often contested and dominated by the interests of particular classes (Domosh, 1998; Goheen, 2004; Lawrence, 1993). Even with open boundaries, cities can exclude or segregate people.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/879668849> # Challenging the public realm : gated communities in history
    a schema:MediaObject, schema:Book, schema:CreativeWork ;
   library:oclcnum "879668849" ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/nsc> ;
   schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/307.77/e22/> ;
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2783173146#Topic/gated_communities> ; # Gated communities
   schema:author <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2783173146#Person/grant_jill_l> ; # Jill L. Grant
   schema:bookFormat schema:EBook ;
   schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2783173146#Organization/dalhousie_university_school_of_planning> ; # Dalhousie University. School of Planning,
   schema:copyrightYear "2008" ;
   schema:datePublished "2014" ;
   schema:description "Private and fortified communities are by no means new in urban history. Cities from ancient times through the Middle Ages often featured walls for protection from inter-group hostility. By the 19th century, though, with pacification and internal security contributing to the development of the modern nation state, the open city became a more characteristic form in Western nations (Mumford, 1961). Rulers and governments invested in urban infrastructure like parks, streets, and sidewalks, creating an improved public realm. While the public spaces and streets of Victorian era cities were in theory open, in practice they were often contested and dominated by the interests of particular classes (Domosh, 1998; Goheen, 2004; Lawrence, 1993). Even with open boundaries, cities can exclude or segregate people."@en ;
   schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/2783173146> ;
   schema:genre "Case studies"@en ;
   schema:genre "Electronic books"@en ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:name "Challenging the public realm : gated communities in history"@en ;
   schema:productID "879668849" ;
   schema:url <http://site.ebrary.com/id/10854144> ;
   schema:url <http://www.deslibris.ca/ID/241421> ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/879668849> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2783173146#Organization/dalhousie_university_school_of_planning> # Dalhousie University. School of Planning,
    a schema:Organization ;
   schema:name "Dalhousie University. School of Planning," ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/2783173146#Person/grant_jill_l> # Jill L. Grant
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Grant" ;
   schema:givenName "Jill L." ;
   schema:name "Jill L. Grant" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.