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The changing shape of things,

Author: Paul Redmayne
Publisher: London, J. Murray, 1945.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Paul Redmayne
OCLC Number: 3528250
Description: 48 pages illustrations 28 cm
Contents: Wheels become stronger and lighter as roads improve. --
The changing shape of bicycles, coaches, motor-cars and trains. --
The influence of materials of purpose and tradition on the shape of boats. --
Strength, lightness and streamlining determine the shape of aeroplanes. --
The shape of bridges strength and lightness. --
Different needs and materials make different kinds of homes. --
English houses built from wood and clay. --
New materials and new methods change the shape of buildings. --
Windows become larger as skill in building and glass-making grows. --
Fashions in furnishing change from Victorian frills to Georgian austerity. --
The shapes of chairs depend on the way they are made and material used. --
From tent-beds to bedrooms. --
Chests & chest of drawers --
cupboards & fitted kitchens. --
Equipment for cooking, two kinds of kitchens. --
The development of lighting fittings, copying is easier than designing. --
The method of manufacture controls the shape of pottery. --
How bottles and glasses were changed in shape. --
The reason for the shape of barrels and tins. --
The shape of letters. --
Extremes of fashion soon appear absurd. --
The pendulum of fashion. --
New materials make new designs possible.
Responsibility: by Paul Redmayne, M.A., illustrated by Francis McNally, N.R.D.

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