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Chaucer and Langland : the antagonistic tradition

Author: John M Bowers
Publisher: Notre Dame, Ind. : University of Notre Dame Press, ©2007.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Although Geoffrey Chaucer and William Langland together dominate fourteenth-century English literature, their respective masterpieces, The Canterbury Tales and Piers Plowman, could not be more different. While Langland's poem was immediately popular and influential, it was Chaucer who stood at the head of a literary tradition within a generation of his death. John Bowers asks why and how Chaucer, not Langland, was  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Bowers, John M., 1949-
Chaucer and Langland.
Notre Dame, Ind. : University of Notre Dame Press, c2007
(OCoLC)608408553
Named Person: Geoffrey Chaucer; William Langland; Geoffrey Chaucer; William Langland; Geoffrey Chaucer; William Langland; William Langland; Geoffrey Chaucer; Geoffrey Chaucer; William Langland; Geoffrey Chaucer; William Langland
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: John M Bowers
ISBN: 026802202X 9780268022020
OCLC Number: 77004085
Description: xii, 405 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: The Antagonistic tradition --
Beginnings --
Naming names: "Langland" and "Chaucer" --
Piers Plowman and the impulse to antagonism --
Political corrections: The Canterbury Tales --
The house of Chaucer & Son: the business of Lancastrian Canon-formation --
Piers Plowman, print, and protestantism.
Responsibility: John M. Bowers.
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Abstract:

Examines the political, social, and religious factors that contributed to the formation of a literary canon in fourteenth-century England. This book tracks the reputations of Geoffrey Chaucer and  Read more...

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"John M. Bowers begins his newest book with a simple question: why has Geoffrey Chaucer, not William Langland become the poet whom many, beginning with Dryden, have dubbed "the Father of English Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Although Geoffrey Chaucer and William Langland together dominate fourteenth-century English literature, their respective masterpieces, The Canterbury Tales and Piers Plowman, could not be more different. While Langland's poem was immediately popular and influential, it was Chaucer who stood at the head of a literary tradition within a generation of his death. John Bowers asks why and how Chaucer, not Langland, was granted this position. His study reveals the political, social, and religious factors that contributed to the formation of a literary canon in fourteenth-century England."--BOOK JACKET."
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