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Chicago skyscrapers, 1871-1934

Author: Thomas Leslie
Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2013]
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"For more than a century, Chicago's skyline has included some of the world's most distinctive and inspiring buildings. This history of the Windy City's skyscrapers begins in the key period of reconstruction after the Great Fire of 1871 and concludes in 1934 with the onset of the Great Depression, which brought architectural progress to a standstill. During this time, such iconic landmarks as the Chicago Tribune  Read more...
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Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Leslie
ISBN: 9780252037542 0252037545 0252094794 9780252094798
OCLC Number: 812122338
Description: xxv, 234 pages : illustrations (some color), map ; 27 cm
Contents: October 1871 --
"Built mostly of itself": Chicago and clay, 1874-1891 --
Iron and light: the "great architectural problem" and the skeleton frame, 1879-1892 --
Steel and wind: the braced frame, 1890-1897 --
Glass and light: "veneers" and curtain walls, 1889-1904 --
Steel, clay, and glass: the expressed frame, 1897-1910 --
Steel, light, and style: the concealed frame, 1905-1918 --
Power and height: the electric skyscraper, 1920-1934 --
Chicago, 1934.
Responsibility: Thomas Leslie.

Abstract:

Highlights an exceptionally dynamic, energetic period of architectural progress in Chicago.  Read more...

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"This groundbreaking and ambitious study provides a thorough technical history of the development of Chicago skyscrapers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Thomas Leslie's work on Read more...

 
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