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Child, family, and community : family-centered early care and education

Author: Janet Gonzalez-Mena
Publisher: Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Merrill Pearson, ©2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 5th edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Written in an accessible style for all those who work with young children or will, the author asks the reader to think of the child in the context of the family and community. Reorganized and updated, the book continues to examine developmental theory, but now with a greater emphasis on Bronfenbrenner's theory of ecological development, discussed in Chapter 1, and more on the importance of contexts of development  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Janet Gonzalez-Mena
ISBN: 9780135132302 0135132304
OCLC Number: 191846788
Notes: Rev. ed. of: The young child in the family and the community. 4th ed. c2006.
Description: xxii, 394 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. The child in context of family and community --
Looking at context through ecological theory --
Implications for early education : family-centered approaches --
History of family-centered care and education --
Other lenses through which to look at family-centered approaches --
Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
2. Supporting families around issues of attachment --
Attachment and trust --
How attachment occurs --
Attachment behaviors --
Obstacles to attachment --
Learning to cope with feelings of loss --
Varying attachment patterns --
Judging attachment in a cross-cultural situation --
Child care and attachment --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
3. Supporting families with autonomy-seeking youngsters --
Toddlers and autonomy --
Signs of developing autonomy --
Dealing with issues of power and control --
Coping with loss and separation --
Partnering with parents of toddlers --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
4. Sharing views of initiative with families --
What initiative looks like in a 4-year-old --
Analyzing initiative in a 4-year-old --
Developmental conflicts --
Imagination and fantasy --
The value of play of all sorts --
How the environment contributes to a sense of initiative --
How adults contribute to children's initiative --
Special considerations for children with disabilities --
The shy child --
A look at aggression --
Teaching young children problem-solving skills --
Empowering the preschool-age child --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
5. Working with families of school-age children --
A family-centered approach to kindergarten --
Erikson's stages of development --
Differences families notice between school and preschool --
How do you find out what families want for their children? --
Teaching prosocial skills --
Looking at the decision-making process as a way of exploring morals --
The power of adult attention --
What are affirmations? --
Teaching morals by promoting prosocial development --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
6. Understanding families' goals, values, and culture --
Cultural differences in goals and values --
Contrasting cultural patterns --
When families and early educators have conflicting goals and values --
What to do when conflicts arise --
Helping children understand and value cultural pluralism --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
7. Working with families on guidance issues --
Defining the word discipline --
Problems with using punishment to teach --
Guidelines for disciplining young children --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading.; 8. Working with families on addressing feelings and problem solving --
Feelings --
What are feelings? --
Learning feelings --
Teaching children to cope with feelings --
Problem solving --
Problem solving s a cultural issue --
Problem solving and parenting styles --
A deeper look at the three parenting styles --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
9. Working with families to support self-esteem --
Portrait of a person with high self-esteem --
Definition of self-esteem --
Dimensions of self-esteem --
The role of beliefs and expectations in self-esteem --
Where does self-esteem come from? --
Promoting self-esteem --
Children learn from failure --
Celebrating differences : an antibias approach --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
10. Working with families around gender issues --
Why think about teaching gender roles? --
The women of today --
Gender equity and child rearing --
Using modeling to teach --
Differential socialization --
The role of biology in creating differences between boys and girls --
Guidelines for parents and early childhood educators --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
11. Stress and success in family life --
Successful families --
Traits of successful families --
Stress as a positive force --
What we can learn from studies of resilient children --
Helping all children become resilient children --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
12. Early care and education programs as community resources --
Early care and education programs as child-rearing environments --
Affordability and availability --
The state of child care in America today --
Looking at quality --
Adult-child interactions in child care and early education settings --
Including everybody : children with special needs --
Partnering with parents --
Questions concerning continuity between child care and home --
Parent-professional partnerships --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
13. Other community resources --
Social networks --
Families using community resources --
Connections to the community --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
14. Societal influences on children and families --
Socialization and the family --
Schools as socializing agents --
The peer group as an agent of socialization --
The media as an influence on socialization --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
15. Social policy issues --
Who is responsible for America's children? --
Ready to learn : a goal for all of America's children --
Moving toward full-inclusion programs --
Economic development --
Adequate health services and nutrition for all --
Taking a preventive approach --
Advocacy --
Violence and its effect on children and families --
Looking back and looking forward --
For discussion --
Web sites --
Further reading --
NAEYC : where we stand --
References --
Index.
Responsibility: Janet Gonzalez-Mena.
More information:

Abstract:

Written in an accessible style for all those who work with young children or will, the author asks the reader to think of the child in the context of the family and community. Reorganized and updated, the book continues to examine developmental theory, but now with a greater emphasis on Bronfenbrenner's theory of ecological development, discussed in Chapter 1, and more on the importance of contexts of development woven throughout. The book goes beyond encouraging mere parent involvement to how to develop a true collaboration and working relationship through good communication. It also continues to have strong coverage of cultural diversity and present personal examples and vignettes. The text explores many hot-button issues of the day such as supporting self-esteem, discipline, attachment, coping with separation, teen parents, child-abuse, children with ADHD, shy children, aggressive children, conflict resolution, problem solving, and gender issues. Full of real life examples and personal insights, the book is designed and written for not just teachers, but caregivers, child-care workers, and parents.All readers are expected to reach into their own experience, knowledge, ideas and insights to make sense of the new information in the text in the context of their own lives.

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schema:description"1. The child in context of family and community -- Looking at context through ecological theory -- Implications for early education : family-centered approaches -- History of family-centered care and education -- Other lenses through which to look at family-centered approaches -- Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 2. Supporting families around issues of attachment -- Attachment and trust -- How attachment occurs -- Attachment behaviors -- Obstacles to attachment -- Learning to cope with feelings of loss -- Varying attachment patterns -- Judging attachment in a cross-cultural situation -- Child care and attachment -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 3. Supporting families with autonomy-seeking youngsters -- Toddlers and autonomy -- Signs of developing autonomy -- Dealing with issues of power and control -- Coping with loss and separation -- Partnering with parents of toddlers -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 4. Sharing views of initiative with families -- What initiative looks like in a 4-year-old -- Analyzing initiative in a 4-year-old -- Developmental conflicts -- Imagination and fantasy -- The value of play of all sorts -- How the environment contributes to a sense of initiative -- How adults contribute to children's initiative -- Special considerations for children with disabilities -- The shy child -- A look at aggression -- Teaching young children problem-solving skills -- Empowering the preschool-age child -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 5. Working with families of school-age children -- A family-centered approach to kindergarten -- Erikson's stages of development -- Differences families notice between school and preschool -- How do you find out what families want for their children? -- Teaching prosocial skills -- Looking at the decision-making process as a way of exploring morals -- The power of adult attention -- What are affirmations? -- Teaching morals by promoting prosocial development -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 6. Understanding families' goals, values, and culture -- Cultural differences in goals and values -- Contrasting cultural patterns -- When families and early educators have conflicting goals and values -- What to do when conflicts arise -- Helping children understand and value cultural pluralism -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 7. Working with families on guidance issues -- Defining the word discipline -- Problems with using punishment to teach -- Guidelines for disciplining young children -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading.; 8. Working with families on addressing feelings and problem solving -- Feelings -- What are feelings? -- Learning feelings -- Teaching children to cope with feelings -- Problem solving -- Problem solving s a cultural issue -- Problem solving and parenting styles -- A deeper look at the three parenting styles -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 9. Working with families to support self-esteem -- Portrait of a person with high self-esteem -- Definition of self-esteem -- Dimensions of self-esteem -- The role of beliefs and expectations in self-esteem -- Where does self-esteem come from? -- Promoting self-esteem -- Children learn from failure -- Celebrating differences : an antibias approach -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 10. Working with families around gender issues -- Why think about teaching gender roles? -- The women of today -- Gender equity and child rearing -- Using modeling to teach -- Differential socialization -- The role of biology in creating differences between boys and girls -- Guidelines for parents and early childhood educators -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 11. Stress and success in family life -- Successful families -- Traits of successful families -- Stress as a positive force -- What we can learn from studies of resilient children -- Helping all children become resilient children -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 12. Early care and education programs as community resources -- Early care and education programs as child-rearing environments -- Affordability and availability -- The state of child care in America today -- Looking at quality -- Adult-child interactions in child care and early education settings -- Including everybody : children with special needs -- Partnering with parents -- Questions concerning continuity between child care and home -- Parent-professional partnerships -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 13. Other community resources -- Social networks -- Families using community resources -- Connections to the community -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 14. Societal influences on children and families -- Socialization and the family -- Schools as socializing agents -- The peer group as an agent of socialization -- The media as an influence on socialization -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- 15. Social policy issues -- Who is responsible for America's children? -- Ready to learn : a goal for all of America's children -- Moving toward full-inclusion programs -- Economic development -- Adequate health services and nutrition for all -- Taking a preventive approach -- Advocacy -- Violence and its effect on children and families -- Looking back and looking forward -- For discussion -- Web sites -- Further reading -- NAEYC : where we stand -- References -- Index."@en
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