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China: Business. Meetings: Setting Up Meetings.

Author: Kanopy (Firm)
Publisher: [San Francisco, California, USA] : Kanopy Streaming, 2016.
Edition/Format:   eVideo : Clipart/images/graphics
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Chinese like to be as prepared as possible for business meetings, so try to set them up well in advance. If you're already in China, two weeks' notice is considered a sufficient lead time for a meeting with top officials. You can get away with a little less planning if you're meeting lower-level executives. Meetings can be set up by telephone and by e-mail, as well as through the mail. Be aware that if you're  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Clipart/images/graphics, Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File, Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Kanopy (Firm)
OCLC Number: 956892890
Language Note: In English.
Notes: Title from title frames.
In Process Record.
Event notes: Originally produced by Atma Global in 2012.
Description: 1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 2 minutes)

Abstract:

The Chinese like to be as prepared as possible for business meetings, so try to set them up well in advance. If you're already in China, two weeks' notice is considered a sufficient lead time for a meeting with top officials. You can get away with a little less planning if you're meeting lower-level executives. Meetings can be set up by telephone and by e-mail, as well as through the mail. Be aware that if you're trying to set up a meeting before you get to China, you may find it difficult to pin down a date and time. The Chinese are generally reluctant to commit a chunk of time to a foreigner well in advance, just in case the proposed business trip doesn't come off. You'll probably be able to arrange vague plans to get together before you arrive, but you should expect to finalize the details nearer the date. It's important to provide the Chinese people you'll be meeting with as much information as you can about your company, the people you're bringing with you, and the project you're proposing or working on. Not only will this make the Chinese feel more in control, but it will also enable them to arrange for you to meet the most appropriate people, saving you valuable time in the long run. Punctuality is crucial in China: Don't be early or late, as arriving on time is seen as a sign of respect for your Chinese counterparts. If you find yourself held up for any reason, make sure you let your hosts know and explain why you're delayed when you arrive so your lateness isn't mistaken for rudeness. On your arrival, your car will be met by representatives from the Chinese organization, who will immediately escort you to the meeting area - usually a conference room and rarely a private office. Your Chinese associates will be waiting for you there: Chinese protocol calls for the host company's party to be ready to greet you when you arrive. Remember the importance of rank in China and how it's reflected in the country's complex mesh of etiquette. With this in mind, try to have the highest-ranking member of your team enter the meeting room first. The Chinese may well assume the first person to enter is the most important, so it's in your interests to avoid confusion if possible. The other members of your team should follow the team leader in order of rank. You may see a number of people at the meeting. Chinese officials rarely conduct meetings by themselves, preferring to bolster their side with a number of lesser-ranking individuals, particularly on formal occasions. You'll probably find that fewer people will be involved in informal meetings.

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Primary Entity

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Related Entities

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    rdfs:comment "A Kanopy streaming video" ;
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