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China: Business. Workforce.

Author: Kanopy (Firm)
Publisher: [San Francisco, California, USA] : Kanopy Streaming, 2016.
Edition/Format:   eVideo : Clipart/images/graphics
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
With 1.2 billion people, China has a huge workforce, and it's becoming better educated, more mobile, and more diverse all the time. But the main attraction of the workforce is the abundance of inexpensive manual labor. Labor-intensive industries have been thriving for 20 years, and, as more areas of the hinterland open up, new sources of cheap labor are becoming available. Simultaneously, there's been a rise in  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Clipart/images/graphics, Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File, Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Kanopy (Firm)
OCLC Number: 956896539
Language Note: In English.
Notes: Title from title frames.
In Process Record.
Event notes: Originally produced by Atma Global in 2012.
Description: 1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 2 minutes)

Abstract:

With 1.2 billion people, China has a huge workforce, and it's becoming better educated, more mobile, and more diverse all the time. But the main attraction of the workforce is the abundance of inexpensive manual labor. Labor-intensive industries have been thriving for 20 years, and, as more areas of the hinterland open up, new sources of cheap labor are becoming available. Simultaneously, there's been a rise in labor costs in the comparatively rich coastal areas where workers with more specialized skills are in demand. But, while China may have labor in abundance, the quality of the workforce is less than stellar, so that, increasingly, the workers are unable to meet the needs of their rapidly evolving country. There's a chronic shortage of well-trained and experienced technical and managerial personnel, which is preventing Chinese industries from upgrading to the levels seen in foreign enterprises, especially multinational corporations. Foreign companies in China also have a hard time finding qualified workers. Traditionally, education and training were the domain of the state; education reforms, including opening up the education sector to private concerns, have started to be made, but only recently. Despite the efforts of state and nonstate education and training providers, and a growing list of foreign institutions setting up shop in China, the human resource shortage remains a daunting problem. For the foreseeable future, foreign companies will have to rely extensively on expatriates and company-trained workers. This adds substantially to the cost of doing business in China. Pay Scale Expatriate managers are paid the highest salaries in China, while Chinese managers educated overseas are paid less. At the bottom of the managerial ladder are managers who were educated in China. Both domestic and foreign-owned companies face a growing problem of keeping employees. State-owned Chinese enterprises tend to have generous benefits packages, which are hard to compete with even if a joint venture pays higher salaries. Many companies now provide housing for their employees - or a cash allowance to offset the rising cost of housing in the major cities. Mobility Despite the restrictive household registration system, intended to prohibit people from moving to other regions within China, Chinese workers are actually fairly mobile. Internal migrants tend to seek jobs in the special economic zones in the coastal areas. And other workers in large numbers have left the safe haven of state-owned enterprises for the burgeoning nonstate sector. China also has a huge so-called floating population, made up of millions of migrants who have left rural and less prosperous urban areas in search of better lives. Most of these workers are unskilled and take on jobs Chinese in the new urban middle class find less attractive.

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Linked Data


Primary Entity

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   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3803400861#Thing/hospitality_&_tourism> ; # Hospitality & Tourism
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3803400861#Thing/k_12> ; # K-12
   schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3803400861#Organization/kanopy_firm> ; # Kanopy (Firm)
   schema:description "With 1.2 billion people, China has a huge workforce, and it's becoming better educated, more mobile, and more diverse all the time. But the main attraction of the workforce is the abundance of inexpensive manual labor. Labor-intensive industries have been thriving for 20 years, and, as more areas of the hinterland open up, new sources of cheap labor are becoming available. Simultaneously, there's been a rise in labor costs in the comparatively rich coastal areas where workers with more specialized skills are in demand. But, while China may have labor in abundance, the quality of the workforce is less than stellar, so that, increasingly, the workers are unable to meet the needs of their rapidly evolving country. There's a chronic shortage of well-trained and experienced technical and managerial personnel, which is preventing Chinese industries from upgrading to the levels seen in foreign enterprises, especially multinational corporations. Foreign companies in China also have a hard time finding qualified workers. Traditionally, education and training were the domain of the state; education reforms, including opening up the education sector to private concerns, have started to be made, but only recently. Despite the efforts of state and nonstate education and training providers, and a growing list of foreign institutions setting up shop in China, the human resource shortage remains a daunting problem. For the foreseeable future, foreign companies will have to rely extensively on expatriates and company-trained workers. This adds substantially to the cost of doing business in China. Pay Scale Expatriate managers are paid the highest salaries in China, while Chinese managers educated overseas are paid less. At the bottom of the managerial ladder are managers who were educated in China. Both domestic and foreign-owned companies face a growing problem of keeping employees. State-owned Chinese enterprises tend to have generous benefits packages, which are hard to compete with even if a joint venture pays higher salaries. Many companies now provide housing for their employees - or a cash allowance to offset the rising cost of housing in the major cities. Mobility Despite the restrictive household registration system, intended to prohibit people from moving to other regions within China, Chinese workers are actually fairly mobile. Internal migrants tend to seek jobs in the special economic zones in the coastal areas. And other workers in large numbers have left the safe haven of state-owned enterprises for the burgeoning nonstate sector. China also has a huge so-called floating population, made up of millions of migrants who have left rural and less prosperous urban areas in search of better lives. Most of these workers are unskilled and take on jobs Chinese in the new urban middle class find less attractive." ;
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Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3803400861#Thing/hospitality_&_tourism> # Hospitality & Tourism
    a schema:Thing ;
   schema:name "Hospitality & Tourism" ;
    .

<http://institution.kanopystreaming.com/node/79343>
   rdfs:comment "A Kanopy streaming video" ;
    .

<http://www.kanopystreaming.com/node/79343>
   rdfs:comment "A Kanopy streaming video" ;
    .


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