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A Choice penny-worth of wit: or, A clear distinction between a virtuous wife and a wanton harlot. : In three parts. Part I. How a merchant was deluded from his lady by a harlot, to whom he carried gold, jewels, and other things of value, for many years, which the receiv'd with unspeakable flatery, 'call his wife gave him 2 penny to lay out on a penny-worth of wit. Part II. How he fail'd to a far country, where having exchang'd his gods for other rich merchandize, and being in a tavern (making merry) he scornfully derided his wife, and extoll'd his harlot ; for which he was sharply reprov'd by an ancient man, who put him in a way to try his Harlot's love in a time of trouble ; for which the merchant gave him his wife's penny. Part III. How he return'd richly loaden to the British shore ; where he put himself in ragged poor array, and came to his harlot, declaring, that he had not only lost all that ever he had in a storm ; but that he had likewise slain one of his servants ; for which his life was in great danger, and desired her shelter ; but instead of so doing, she abused him with taunting vile language, threatning to have him apprehended ; at which he left her and returned to his wife (with the same pretence) who received him with unspeakable joy, offering to sacrifice all that ever she had to save his life. Thus did he prove her a faithful wife, and the other a flattering harlot. With other things, worthy of observation. Preview this item
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A Choice penny-worth of wit: or, A clear distinction between a virtuous wife and a wanton harlot. : In three parts. Part I. How a merchant was deluded from his lady by a harlot, to whom he carried gold, jewels, and other things of value, for many years, which the receiv'd with unspeakable flatery, 'call his wife gave him 2 penny to lay out on a penny-worth of wit. Part II. How he fail'd to a far country, where having exchang'd his gods for other rich merchandize, and being in a tavern (making merry) he scornfully derided his wife, and extoll'd his harlot ; for which he was sharply reprov'd by an ancient man, who put him in a way to try his Harlot's love in a time of trouble ; for which the merchant gave him his wife's penny. Part III. How he return'd richly loaden to the British shore ; where he put himself in ragged poor array, and came to his harlot, declaring, that he had not only lost all that ever he had in a storm ; but that he had likewise slain one of his servants ; for which his life was in great danger, and desired her shelter ; but instead of so doing, she abused him with taunting vile language, threatning to have him apprehended ; at which he left her and returned to his wife (with the same pretence) who received him with unspeakable joy, offering to sacrifice all that ever she had to save his life. Thus did he prove her a faithful wife, and the other a flattering harlot. With other things, worthy of observation.

Publisher: York : Printed by Thomas Gent, in Cofee-Yard, near Stone-Gate, [1750?]
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Genre/Form: Early works
Poems
Early works to 1800
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
OCLC Number: 509563940
Notes: Reproduction of original from Bodleian Library (Oxford).
Description: 1 online resource (8 pages)

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